Black Panther Star Chadwick Boseman Dies At 43

The Black Panther actor was battling colon cancer for the last four years.

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Chadwick Boseman, the actor best known for his starring role in Black Panther, has passed away at 43. He had been fighting a four-year battle with colon cancer.

The news was reported by the AP and then confirmed on Boseman's Twitter account, which states that he was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 2016. Over the last four years, it progressed to stage IV.

"A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all, and brought you many of the films you have come to love so much. From Marshall to Da 5 Bloods, August Wilson's Ma Rainey's Black Bottom and several more, all were filmed during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy.

"It was the honor of his career to bring King T'Challa to life in Black Panther."

The tweet goes on to say he died at home with his wife and family.

Boseman is best known for his role in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, having debuted as T'Challa in 2016's Captain America: Civil War. But his credits extend back to the early 2000s, with roles on shows like Law & Order, Third Watch, and CSI: NY. In 2013, he starred as Jackie Robinson in 42, a well-received biopic about the life of the first African American player in Major League Baseball.

His appearance in Civil War paved the way for 2018's Black Panther, the first Marvel Studios film centered around a Black star. He has since appeared in Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame, and Black Panther 2 was slated to release in May 2022 as part of MCU's Phase 4. The yet-to-be-released Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, a Netflix drama based on the play, may now be his final acting role.

In reaction to the news, co-stars and admirers have been sharing their reactions and memorials on Twitter. These include Marvel co-stars Don Cheadle and Brie Larson, Black Panther comic writer Evan Narcisse, and Joe Biden, among many others.

Black Panther director Ryan Coogler also released a lengthy statement on Boseman, including recalling how they first met when he signed on to direct the film as well as how he shielded those around him from his diagnosis.

"He lived a beautiful life. And he made great art. Day after day, year after year. That was who he was. He was an epic firework display," Coogler said. "I will tell stories about being there for some of the brilliant sparks till the end of my days. What an incredible mark he's left for us."

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