Bill Murray Facing Legal Trouble From The Doobie Brothers, And The Letter Is A Must-Read

The '70s band has some choice words for the actor's golf-shirt commercial.

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And now for something completely different: Bill Murray is being threatened by '70s mellow rock band The Doobie Brothers for unlicensed use of their song "Listen to the Music" in an advertisement for his golf shirts.

In a filing unearthed by The Hollywood Reporter, the easygoing band surprisingly bares its fangs--their attorney Peter Paterno chastises Murray, writing: "It seems like the only person who uses our clients' music without permission more than you do is Donald Trump… We'd almost be OK with it if the shirts weren't so damn ugly."

For those who didn't even realize Bill Murray has a golf-shirt business, you can go over to William Murray Golf's official website and decide for yourself about the actor's sartorial tastes. However, to be fair, it should be noted that golf is a sport where wardrobes are typically garish--anyone who has ever caddied for a summer knows this all too well. (The lawsuit also finds Murray joining his Chicago hometown fellow superstar Michael Jordan in being called out for bad taste: In 2012, Jordan, a man who has long lived by his own rules, was banned from La Gorce Country Club in Miami for not abiding by the dress code, and his repeated wearing cargo pants cited as the inciting offense.)

In the two-page filing, Paterno continually tries to outdo himself in flinging insults Murray's way. The allegedly offending ads are for the Zero Hucks Given golf shirts, which the lawyer says should be rechristened as "Zero Bucks Given." Later in the email, Paterno says he's "too lazy to look up and threaten you with eternal damnation" over what specific United States Copyright Act Murray is not complying with. Added Paterno about the forthcoming punishment: "You already earned that with those Garfield movies. And you already know you can't use music in ads without paying for it."

Murray's camp has not yet responded, but given what a deep and established tradition there is of lawyer jokes, even if Murray is in the wrong he will likely gain the upper hand.

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