Angry Birds, Tetris fall on PSN

PlayStation Store Update: Mobile megahit comes to Sony's virtual marketplace next to block-dropping puzzler, arcade shooter MicroBot.


Arc the Lad III
Auditorium HD

No Caption Provided Sony rings in the first week of 2011 with a slew of new titles for its downloadable storefront, spearheaded by a pair of breakthrough hits for the casual crowd.

Taking flight today for the PlayStation 3 as a PlayStation mini is Rovio Mobile's physics-based puzzle game Angry Birds ($4). Selling more than 6.5 million copies on the Apple App Store since its December 2009 launch, the title has players catapulting birds into the air, using them as munitions in a struggle against nefarious pigs.

The birds are still angry.
The birds are still angry.

Decades before Angry Birds hit the scene, the mainstream gaming phenomenon of the moment was Tetris. Those seeking a new way to play the old favorite can now download Tetris ($10) for the PlayStation 3. The block-dropping puzzler is back this week with 1080p visuals, 5.1 surround sound, six multiplayer modes, and three "brand new game modes" that are exclusive to the PS3.

Also out now is MicroBot ($10). Developed by Naked Sky Entertainment, the game sees players controlling a microscopic robot tasked with swimming through a human body, destroying enemies, and curing diseases. MicroBot has players traveling through the entire length of the body, fighting foes with upgradable weapons, special attacks, and defensive maneuvers.

The last new PS3 title of the week is Ricochet HD ($8). The brick-busting action game sports 150 distinct multi-staged levels, where an arsenal of power-ups and modifiers help players work through each environment.

Sony also added two PSOne Classics to its download space this week, the first of which is Reloaded ($6). From Gremlin Interactive, this sequel to Loaded debuted in 1996. A shoot-'em-up, the game has players controlling one of six characters, ultimately striving to defeat the nefarious C.H.E.B.

The other PSOne Classic out now is Arc The Lad III ($6). The final original PlayStation entry in Sony's tactical role-playing game series, the game has players controlling Alec, an unassuming young man bent on defeating the forces of evil. It launched in Japan in 1999, but it didn't see a North American release until Working Designs' Arc the Lad Collection in 2002.

The PSP storefront received three new titles this week, the first of which is Legends of War: Patton's Campaign ($20). The title thrusts players into the capable boots of General Patton, commanding the U.S. Third Army from France to Berlin. In total, the strategy title sports 35 missions, where players attempt to make history.

Also now available in the PSP marketplace is Auditorium ($10). From Cipher Prime, the puzzle game has players manipulating light to ultimately fill audio receptacles. Like Angry Birds, Auditorium was previously available as an iOS game.

The final entry out this week for Sony's portable gaming machine is the Hot Shots Shorties series. Hot Shots Shorties is a collection of minigames divided into four colored compilations: Green, Yellow, Red, and Blue. Each is $5 and comes with three distinct minigames. All four packs can be purchased in a single bundle for $15.

Gamers thirsting for new tunes to play along with this week have a number of options to choose from. Rock Band 3 welcomes eight new jams from the late Johnny Cash, four tunes from Paul McCartney & Wings, as well as a nine-song free track pack featuring artists ranging from Bang Camaro to That Handsome Devil.

Def Jam: Rapstar added four new songs this week: "Money to Blow" by Birdman, "Get Your Freak On" by Missy Elliot, "Laffy Taffy" by D4L, and "Pass the Courvoisier, Part II" by Busta Rhymes. Each song is available as a $2 individual download.

A full list of the week's deals and new PlayStation Store content, including themes, wallpapers, demos, discounts, and add-on content, is available on the PlayStation Blog.

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