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Feature Article

American Horror Story Had A Top 10 Of All Time Vomit Scene This Week

American Horror Story Apocalypse spoilers below!

The latest episode of American Horror Story Apocalypse, "Forbidden Fruit," will likely go down as having one of the all time great vomit scenes in history. If you haven't watched the episode yet, go away, because we're going to spoil the heck out of it.

We're used to characters dying on American Horror Story, but usually more than half the characters on the show don't all die in a single scene--and never so spectacularly as they did in "Forbidden Fruit." As Wilhemina and her robot pal Ms. Mead hatched the plan to poison the shipment of apples, we as viewers assumed that some person or force would intervene. It would be insane to throw away all the build-up and character development of Apocalypse's first three episodes, we thought. Apparently we forgot what show we were watching.

When the moment finally came, it made all that wasted potential worth it. Watching most of the cast of American Horror Story spew vomit and blood all over themselves, their environment, and their companions was disgusting, horrifying, and uproarious all at once. In fact, it perfectly encapsulated those qualities--the notes that AHS usually hits when the show is at its best.

We had to know more about the puke scene, so we chatted with actor Kyle Allen, who until recently played Timothy on American Horror Story Apocalypse. We touched on what it was like to shoot, what the puke was made of, and whether this is a turning point for the season.

When you're done here, check out our interviews with AHS stars Adina Porter and Leslie Grossman, and subscribe to GameSpot Universe for breakdowns of every new episode.

GameSpot: So are you dead dead, or are you American Horror Story dead, if you know what I mean?

Kyle Allen: Oh, man, I have no idea. No one has told me anything. So I'm going about my day as a dead man.

So you're waiting by the phone to maybe get that call, "Hey, we need you back."

Not because I'm desperate, but because I have my phone in my pocket.

Sure. I guess waiting by the phone is an antiquated expression at this point, right? We're all waiting by our phones all the time.

Yeah, that is pretty much the existence of modern society.

So, were you an American Horror Story fan before this role?

Yes, it was a love hate relationship. I don't do well with scary, disturbing, or horrifying stuff, but it was so good that I got through a handful of seasons. But yeah, I didn't really do well in Hotel or Murder House, but I got through all of Coven and Freak Show. And those ones were my favorite.

Would you consider those the less scary seasons?

I think there was more to distract me from how anxiety ridden I was watching it, because they got "the force" and they can push each other around and do weird spells, and that guy's a zombie, she's a voodoo queen. There's an interesting angle to it and how they chose to navigate that. It's like a really messed up Hogwarts for six people. Those sorts of things allowed me to forget more terrifying aspects of it.

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Yeah, that's one thing that the show does really well, is there are moments that are terrifying, and there are moments that are goofy fun, right?

Yeah, exactly.

How does it feel as a person who is, I guess, maybe squeamish around horror, or not a huge horror fan, how does it feel shooting this stuff?

It's a blast to make. It's really fun. It's not scary at all to make in production. It's really fun. I understand why people make these movies, because it's a really good time to do. Not as much fun for me to watch, way more fun to do.

What's it like being on the set that we've been in for the first few episodes? Because it seems so claustrophobic and crazy while you're watching it. What does it feel like?

It's amazing. It's such an incredible set. I walk around in between takes. I really enjoy it. I think it doesn't feel as claustrophobic, because most sets, when you're on a soundstage, feel way more claustrophobic than that, because the sets aren't as grand and spacious as that is. You're usually in much smaller rooms and corridors and stuff, so I feel like it's quite possible to get way more claustrophobic on a different set, where that one actually has way more room.

But they have fog machines that are pumping at all hours of the day, and everything's lit by actual fire and candlelight. They've got some artificial lighting, but most of the lighting you see is from the actual fire from the candles, or the fire pit. And so, for 12 hours a day, sometimes more, you will be in a foggy candlelit bunker, and you feel reality slipping away.

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Yeah, I don't know. That does sound scary.

Yeah, it's not bad. It's just people start getting real loopy. You're not sure what time it is, or what it looks like outside, because you have the same lighting all day.

Like the actual characters on the show.

Yeah, which is great. You didn't have to act that part. You were actually stuck in the bunker for 12 hours a day.

So, your character was easily the most, or one of the two most, normal people there. Did you feel from the beginning like the two of you were destined for some gruesome death? Normal people, or average people, don't tend to survive very long in this show.

Yes, so I figured. Also contractually, you know how many episodes you're gonna do, so you're like, "All right, yeah, it's coming."

That's funny, so did that affect the way that you played the character? Did you try to play him more tragic, or did you try to just go scene by scene?

Honestly, I was just trying to be like, "How would this person swallow these absolutely astronomically insane circumstances?" And that was just my main focus.

So, how is that? How did the way that the character handled it differ from how would you handle it, you know?

I'm not sure. I didn't quite walk myself through it. I tried to create him from scratch, because if I go into how I would do it, I'm really weird, so it wouldn't make any sense.

No Caption Provided

I feel like, as the audience watching it, you can't help but imagine, "How would I deal with this situation?"

Yeah, gosh, I don't know--that sense of confusion and chaos that brings to your mind. You're like, "God, what would you do?" You have no idea what's going on, or how severe it is, or who's lying, or who's serious, or if you can trust these people. It's this constant state of confusion, which is what I led with. With Timothy, you're dealing with so many factors at any given moment, he's like, just trying to deal, man. Just trying to have a good day.

Were you surprised by this episode, as I think people watching, and I definitely was? American Horror Story kills characters a lot, but it usually doesn't kill all the characters in one scene in the third episode.

Yeah, I think I just dropped the script on the floor and was like, dang. We spent all the time discussing theories and stuff, and you're like, "Oh, that's what happened? What is going on?" Because all of our theories, these people needed to not be dead, and now they are. You're like, "I have no clue what's happening."

I was trying to come up with specific questions about the vomit scene, but I just want to know everything about that scene. Could you just tell me what it was like?

Yeah, it was a big old day. We rehearsed it first without blood and the guts and the effects and stuff. And then we all discussed how we were gonna die, and in what way. Like, "You do this, and you fall here. And then you do this, and then fall here." So Ashley [Santos] and I, we came up with ours, like, collapsing into her. And then I got to flop on the couch and roll on the floor as she realizes she's done it. And then each person and group of people all found their own spectacular way to die. And the vomit--I didn't have any vomit, which was great. But the vomit was made out of lime juice, bananas, and apple, and they just blended that together, and that's what people--you just take a mouthful of it, and then you start the scene and those people go crazy and they vomit all over each other. I didn't have any vomit. I was supposed to throw up blood in Ashley's face, which she was psyched for and I felt terrible about.

No Caption Provided

And you actually spat blood in her face?

That's correct. That is what happened. I think we did it three times. The first time I guess I didn't do it correctly. They wanted a spray, like a mist. And I was like, "OK, I can do that." And so we had to do that two different times, so that we got the close ups of that, and then, yeah, I fall on the floor, and then I got--I remember getting a bunch of fake blood in my eyes, burning really bad. And then they had to add the blood coming out of the eyes and the ears as well as the foaming at the mouth. So that was added in after we collapsed on the ground. So we had to wait as they were setting all this stuff, and I had a pool of blood over my eye, and both of my eyes were glued shut with dried blood, so I had no idea what was going on. People were just like, "Just go, move." But it was awesome. It was really to fun flop on the floor all day and pretend to die. It's like what you do when you're playing around, your friend points a finger gun at you and you get to die horrifically. It's a great way to spend your day.

The dunking for apples, which was done, I think, a different day, that was really fun too. It was also really sad, because we had all these beautiful costumes that they made, and we just destroyed them with vomit and blood. Evan [Peters] had this thing, this tube, so it shot out of his mouth all over the place.

Jesus.

It was gnarly.

Yeah, it was.

And then everyone is just falling over and dying.

I guess people's reactions are real too. When you're spitting blood in someone's face, and they flinch and shut their eyes, it's because you're really spitting blood in their face.

Yeah. No, it's a very real reaction from Ashley, because that is what was occurring.

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It seemed like this episode was a turning point for this season. I don't know if you know anything about going forward, but it seems that way. I don't know if you could say anything about that.

I agree with you. It does seem that way. And I think that's a fair assumption, that the introduction of the characters from past seasons and everything that's been going on, has been on a certain theme. And now, definitely it's not going where we thought it was going, and I think that's a very cool thing that the writers did. Yeah, I genuinely don't know what happens moving forward.

So, you'll just be watching week to week with the rest of us.

Yeah, I'll see what's up.

Thanks Kyle!

American Horror Story Apocalypse airs Wednesdays on FX.

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mrougeau

Michael Rougeau

Mike Rougeau is GameSpot's Senior Entertainment Editor. He loves Game of Thrones and dogs.
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