Discussion

23 comments
Chatteur
Chatteur

I notice that you forgot all about The Northern Sydney Institute. We teach games design, art and programming and you interviewed some of our graduates in this video.

Aragorn823
Aragorn823

Qantm College.. I used to go there lol..

javalino
javalino

GAme Devepolers != Game Designers

predatorGS
predatorGS

And here I sit silently sobbing behind my PC... expecting a new star trek next generation game -.-

soniex
soniex

I just graduated from Full Sail back in October with a bachelor's in Game Design and I have to say that this video couldn't be more correct.  Indie games are the best way to get noticed.  There are plenty of tools out there to get started on a project or two.  Unreal Development Kit (UDK), Unity, Stencyl, or Construct 2 are all free and good choices.  One thing to keep in mind is that a game doesn't have to look good to be a good game.  Mechanics is where the heart of the game lies and that's when programing comes into play.

For all you designers out there, one of the best things you can do is be familiar with a few programing languages; the two most notable would probably be C# and Java.  I'm currently working on my second project and I've done all of the programing so far for both projects.  Many times you don't have to dive very deep into programing to create some good mechanics.

Gallowhand
Gallowhand

This video offered a nice little insight into the minds of budding developers. :)

I have to agree with the importance of improving interactivity within game worlds.  One of the things that has annoyed me in recent years is developers pushing for more cinematic 'hollywood movie' type experiences, and I don't think that is the strength of the medium.  It reduces interactivity and often leads to 'on rails' experiences.

When I play an RPG or FPS, I want to explore and immerse myself in that world, and see the environment and characters around me react more realistically to my actions.  I would be more impressed with better behavioural AI and character animation, and physics that form a seamless interactive part of the gameplay, rather than photo-realistic graphical fidelity in the next gen of game development.  Graphics have their place for improving immersion, but if the game world is static, and the characters just cardboard cut-outs going through the same old motions, it all becomes a bit stale.

As time goes on, I'm certainly being pulled more toward Indie developed games because they can offer some more creative ideas, or revitalise some of those niche markets that seem to have been abandoned by big publishers over the past decade.  Over half of the games I'm tracking now are Indie titles.  The industry needs some more risk takers with some fresh ideas.

plm3d_basic
plm3d_basic

What makes a game look next gen will probably be textures.  There's very little discernable differences that can be seen when moving from something with 40,000 polygons vs. 80,000.  Meanwhile, a lot of pc modders can make old games look fresh and new with hi-res textures, just like Doom 3 or Half-life 2.  Tessellation also gets rid of blocky characters and environments. Other effects like particle, physics, dynamic lighting, and more A.I. is the icing on the cake. 

AntauriX22
AntauriX22

Unity engine is free and has many advantages student's can use to learn game designing, the premium version just has baking shadow's and higher res model's which is completely unnescesary for starting map designers and scripters

smtgfx
smtgfx

lol...yes we have more freedom but we have no money $$$... have you looked at how much Unreal engine costs? there is not way we can afford that.

andmcq
andmcq

@ 1:50... you mean like a demo? ..

Glenn Bater
Glenn Bater

looks like Lloyd for dumb and dumber playing

Mario_Bones
Mario_Bones

Yipee! I'm famous! :D

Though my interactivity quote kinda sounds silly when it's cut down that much :3

Earl-of-Death
Earl-of-Death

@Gallowhand After all if game companies didn't take risks we wouldn't have big block buster titles in the first place.

Bregzeinkul
Bregzeinkul

@smtgfx said the person who will make a triple A the instant he gets his hands on a popular engine

TohouAsura
TohouAsura

@smtgfx Then use Unity or one of the other free engines. Not half as powerful, but more than enough for the starting game designer.

Alternatively, you could try to develop your own engine, though if you're a starting game developer, there's no way you could do that, heh...

TohouAsura
TohouAsura

@andmcq Demo's are often lies nowadays, not taken out of the actual game.

happens alot, unfortunately.