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Review

Rocksmith 2014 Edition Review

  • Game release: October 22, 2013
  • Reviewed: October 22, 2013
  • X360

This one goes to 11.

by

They say old habits die hard, and in the case of the humble guitar player, never has a statement rung so true. We crave guitars that were crafted in the '50s, amplifiers that run on glowing vacuum tubes, and yes, everything being cranked up to 11. So anything that challenges the status quo in the grand world of guitar playing has got its work cut out for it--and in the case of Rocksmith 2014, a learning tool sprinkled with video game tropes, it's very much an uphill battle.

Certainly, getting into Rocksmith's unique way of teaching guitar is going to be a struggle for anyone who has been playing the instrument for a good amount of time, particularly if you're a fan of using guitar tablature. Instead of reading the notes from left to right like in tab, the setup is like a more complex version of the classic Guitar Hero games. A runway of note blocks scroll from the top to the bottom of the screen, each along a path that corresponds to a particular fret number, with colour coding signifying which string to pluck.

With practice, I got used to this setup, but with 12 years of guitar playing and tab-reading habit gnawing at my brain, it was never as comfortable as I'd have liked. Similarly, Rocksmith's default way of teaching isn't going to be for everyone. Rocksmith uses an adaptive difficulty level where the song is played at full speed, but only a few notes are displayed at a time. Nail those notes, and more are added in, until eventually you're playing the whole song.

It sounds like a great idea, and in some cases it works. With simpler songs, such as Foo Fighters' "Everlong" and Muse's "Knights of Cydonia," it's relatively easy to gradually add in more notes as you play, thanks in part to not having to worry about quick position shifts and dense passages. The initial starting notes are well chosen too, with your fretting hand placed in just the right position to add in those extra notes as the difficulty ramps up.

But for more complex songs, the limitations of this system become clear. I could easily play the simple version of Slayer's thrash classic "War Ensemble," but as the extra notes got added in, the difficulty curve wasn't smooth enough to make playing them at full speed on the fly possible. There simply wasn't enough time to process those new notes and physically memorise where my fingers needed to be before notes had flown by and a new passage had started.

In the old Rocksmith, there wasn't much you could do except grin and bear it, but thankfully Rocksmith 2014 introduces a much-improved version of Riff Repeater, which lets you highlight sections of a song and slow them down to a more acceptable pace. You can set up a speed trainer too, so that a section gradually speeds up as it loops, and set the difficulty to whatever you like so you get all those notes at once. This is far more akin to how a guitar player would traditionally practice a difficult riff or solo: learn all the notes, but play them at slow speed and then speed it up.

This new version of Riff Repeater is such a great feature that it's unimaginable to go back to the old Rocksmith and learn songs without it. That said, it can still be a little clumsy, particularly for really complex arrangements where you want to read ahead and get the notes under your fingers and locked in your head before attempting to play them along with the song. The top-to-bottom setup means that not a whole lot of notes can be displayed onscreen at any one time, and you can't simply scrub through to a section you want either. Being able to display whole sections of the song at once in a tab-like fashion would have been a great addition here.

There's a firm line drawn between the silliness of the Guitarcade minigames and the main song-learning modes.

There are times when Rocksmith's note highway trumps the traditional tab, though. Notes that need to be held are displayed as long streams of colour, palm muted notes have an X struck through them, ornaments like vibrato give notes a wavy look, and glissando stretches them out along the fretboard. These are traditionally difficult things to convey via tab, but here they're easy to read at a glance. Plus, if you're not familiar with a given technique in a song, Rocksmith is packed with excellent tutorial videos for beginners that teach you everything from smooth hammer-ons and pull-offs through to squealing pinch harmonics and tapping.

Useful for beginners and seasoned players alike is the Guitarcade, which teaches techniques like string skipping and bends via a range of 8-bit-style minigames. Escaping a chasing police car by playing Phrygian scales in Scale Racer, or shooting cowboys by skipping strings in String Skip Saloon is a lot of fun, and the minigames are genuinely useful for nailing some of the fundamental skills of guitar playing. The only real slipup here is Hurtlin' Hurdles, which asks you to tremolo pick as fast as you can to run down a racetrack, and then mute the string to jump over a hurdle. Unfortunately, the game doesn't respond as quickly as it should, making this mode far more frustrating than fun.

There's a firm line drawn between the silliness of the Guitarcade minigames and the main song-learning modes, with Rocksmith finally embracing the fact that it's a teaching tool above all else. There's no career progression, for example, nor are any of the songs locked behind some arbitrary score wall. This is exactly as it should be. You're free to learn at your own pace, and the game simply makes some recommendations about what lesson or song to tackle next. The fact that you're learning an actual instrument and playing real songs is all the incentive you need to keep going.

Speaking of songs, the lineup here is much improved over the original game, with tracks that have been chosen because of great guitar work, rather than some unnecessary need to slot in a big-name artist. They're also much trickier on the whole, with the likes of Joe Satriani and Iron Maiden pushing your skills to the limit. Beginners are still catered to with artists like Bob Dylan and the Arctic Monkeys, but the emphasis is on melting faces with killer licks, which is frankly what the vast majority of guitar players want to do. You can put those licks to good use in Session mode, which features a virtual band for you to jam with. It's not the best-sounding band in the world, and some of the chosen chord progressions are a little odd to say the least, but if you stick with the 12-bar blues, there's some fun to be had.

Like in last year's game, there are a few technical issues that get in the way of rocking, most notably with the audio setup, which all but requires you to feed audio directly into an amp via analogue cables. Do it any other way, and the lag between your playing and the sound emerging from the speakers is far too distracting for the game to be playable. It's a shame the resultant guitar tones aren't quite worth the effort. Played along with a song, they're not too bad, but in isolation, they sound fizzy and overprocessed. And try as I might to create something more acceptable in the tone designer, I couldn't rig up anything that sounded less artificial.

When I bashed out my first clumsy Green Day chords on guitar, I'd have killed for as good a teacher as this.

These idioscyncrasies aren't enough to sour what really is a great learning tool for beginners, and a big improvement over the original game. The problems that I had with the layout of the note highway are going to be far less of an issue for those without years of tablature indoctrination, and the tutorials and song selections are good enough to teach you a lot about playing guitar. Rocksmith isn't going to be replacing the likes of a keen ear, a copy of Guitar Pro, and a good set of tabs for me, but when I think back to when I bashed out my first clumsy Green Day chords on guitar, I'd have killed for as good a teacher as this.

The Good
You really can learn guitar with this thing!
Great selection of songs filled with killer riffs
Excellent tutorial videos that are easy to understand and teach a wide range of techniques
Vastly improved Riff Repeater that lets you slow down whole sections of songs
Guitarcade minigames are fun and teach you a thing or two
The Bad
Established players will find it hard to adapt to Rocksmith's way of thinking
Session mode band and guitar tones are passable at best
No way to view whole sections of a note chart at once
8
Great
About GameSpot's Reviews

About the Author

/ Staff

Mark has been playing guitar for the best part of 12 years, during which time he has spent an absurd amount of money collecting instruments, and drove every girlfriend he ever had to insanity with his endless practicing. He regrets nothing.

Discussion

130 comments
joshua6775
joshua6775

I'm a decent player. I've been playing on and off for over 20 years. I bought this game to see what the hype was about, and to see if I could get anything out of it that would make me better. Long story short, I HATE THIS GAME.  "Hate" might not even cover it, actually. I can see a square one noob player being able to enjoy this, but there are songs on this that I know how to play already that aren't even close on the game in terms of how they have you play them.  Do not buy this if you're looking for substance, there just isn't any.  Stick with youtube and your ipad, you'll get so much more out of it.

lindigj
lindigj

In my opinion, two types are really going to like this game -- beginner guitarists, and experienced guitarists who are fans of the guitar hero / rock band series.

If you fall in to the latter camp, this will be easily picked up and after a learning curve similar to the guitar hero games, you will be plucking along to songs that you may have not previously taken the time to learn before. The main difference to me here, is that this is fun, even when you are learning or struggling with a song, which helps to get over the hump when you hit a wall.

As for experienced guitarists who never could wrap their brains around the guitar hero type games -- and believe me, I have some friends that are amazing guitarists that just can't translate their skill to the plastic axe -- this game probably isn't going to be your bag, much for the same reasons why you don't care for the guitar hero style.

For learning the guitar, this game is amazing, but the one caveat is that it lets you completely do whatever you want, so you have to really be disciplined and "mix it up". If you just go in as a beginner and learn the fretting for a particular song you like, that might be fun and engaging, but you likely will have flawed technique and be teaching yourself bad habits -- not to mention, you won't find it as easy to learn new things.

The best way, in my opinion, is to start out by running through at least all of the 101 lessons. Be disciplined and make yourself complete these before moving on to songs. Then go learn the basic versions the game has to offer of some simpler songs. You can sort them by difficulty to select something you can handle. Then it's back to work, this time in the guitarcade. Start out with some levels of Star Chords and this will help you learn new chords with ease. This is effectively practice exercises disguised as 8-bit guitar games. It makes the most boring part of guitar fun, which is a huge selling point of this game. Another game to focus on is the Saloon String Skipping game. This will help you with your plucking speed immensely and lock your brain up with the "guitar hero" style of string reference. Once you are done there, head back in to learn a few easy songs and you will find things much easier. Try mixing up learning lead and rhythm parts as both will teach you different styles which will help you a lot. Once you start to hit a wall and see new things you don't know how to do, head back in to the lessons and polish off the 102 lessons. At this point, if you came in as a beginning guitarist, you still will need a lot of practice, but you are already farther along in a short time that an overwhelming majority of new guitar students. This early portion of guitar tutelage is where this game really shines.

elbacon3
elbacon3

The reviews I’ve read seem to come from people who already play guitar so I wanted to share the opinion of a beginner.I own a guitar that I never learned to play and after four days I think this program is amazing.The best thing about it is that I’m excited about playing again.

I love the display.I have streaming notes up top, and a fingers-by-numbers display on the bottom.They work together well because when I’m just playing notes I want the stream to see what’s coming, and when I get tricky new chords the lower display is more helpful for understanding where to place my fingers.

The lessons are useful.Mainly, they help me when I see something in the stream that I can’t interpret, like the way bends are displayed.

Riff repeater is one of the most useful tools Rocksmith offers.Hard sections aren’t so overwhelming when I can slow them down to a comfortable speed.And, I haven’t run into anything that I can’t play reasonably accurately if I loop it 30 times slowly.

One thing I would recommend to other novices is to learn to play a song you already know.Heart Shaped Box is a comfortable song for me to learn because I know the tune, so I can focus on learning the notes.Songs are a lot easier to learn when I can look at my guitar most of the time since I know what riff is coming up.

When I play without Rocksmith some of my stuff sounds outright awful, but some of it isn’t bad.I don’t know what lessons cost, but I won’t be able to learn to play a song for $80 worth of lessons, let alone 4 songs.After four days I can say I’m MUCH further along than I thought I would be, and I HIGHLY recommend this to anyone who wants to start from scratch.

Cartr1dgeBased
Cartr1dgeBased

having alot of fun with this one. had orignal on ps3 and the cord works on pc so i just got 2014 with all the dlc and the original songs and am having a blast. hope i stick with it this time. there is no noticeable lag (there was a slight lag on ps3 even after the workaround using hdmi and component cables so the audio wouldnt lag as much) and my pc sound system is far superior to my tv.

like the original the mini games are what are going to improve your skill the most. so if you want to get better play those and riff repeaters and things of that nature. so glad they made a second, kinda miss career mode though.

also, if i ever get good enough like the reviewer and the notes/chords are going by blindingly fast, then Rocksmith has already done it's job

Naglfarlindar
Naglfarlindar

I loved the first game (still play it plenty), but I have to say I'm extremely dissapointed at the inclusion of Uplay in this. It's a horrible service that got my personal data hacked and adds nothing at all to my gaming experience. I don't think I'll be buying future version if they keep including Uplay. I might not even keep playing this (2014) version because of it. As I understand it, including the old songs costs 10$, that's a really unfair move. I've paid full price two times and it wasn't cheap. I shouldn't be forced to put up with these kind of tactics.

surfer3000
surfer3000

I think this game is absolutely awesome. I have been playing the original Rocksmith v1 and saw the potential of the game. The improvements over the original are amazing. Especially the speed with which everything starts in the game and the speed with which you can switch between different parts of the game. Ubisoft have also clearly listened to their customers and made the essential changes that were needed such as navigation and the way the games teaches you to play.

I would definitely advice this game to beginners and moderate learners of the guitar  will love this training and game software.

You can clearly see that this is the next generation guitar learning software.


peeger
peeger

Quick update.  After a couple days it is getting easier to read the notes coming at you quickly, I am guessing it will get a lot easier after a few weeks.  One thing is, my freekin hand is killing me.  I haven't played this much guitar in a LOOONG time.  Have lots of liquids, some aspercream for your joints ready.  Its addictive and you will find yourself playing for hours and hours without noticing time.  Need some new strings as well, my fingers are getting chewed up on my old guitar as I need strings for my les paul.  I will bet it will hurt less on that since you don't have to hold the strings down so hard.  If you don't have a guitar, buy a good used one, don't buy a piece of crap that goes out of tune, you will hate playing.  My Les Paul is so easy to play, very little pressure and it stays tuned very well.  My Strat isn't bad but I have thicker strings on that for the SRV sound.

SillySkeleton
SillySkeleton

As someone who's been playing for years, I find Rocksmith a little strange as a tool for learning songs, but also possibly the most fun. If they had incorporated an alternate mode that displays tablature like Guitar Pro, then Rocksmith would be practically perfect.

I'd say this game is a great way to make learning guitar really fun for a beginner, and a great tool for practice for someone more experienced. Even if you feel the note highway isn't the ideal way to learn a song from the ground up, you'll still have session mode for jamming, and chord charts and fun exercises to improve your knowledge and technique.

peeger
peeger

There are also lessons, that aren't being talked about for new players.  They will teach you pretty much every little detail.  In fact, while your learning a song, it will recommend which lesson you need to take to get better.  This is a very complex game, and they put a crap load of stuff in it.  It is well worth buying.  The old game had terrible lag, you hit a string and it took a second for the sound to show up.  It was tough playing along in real time in songs.  This one I haven't noticed any lag.  It sounds great on my computer with 2 speakers and a subwoofer (Altec, older model)  If you want to learn, you need to go through the lessons, play the games, whatever.  There are a ton of ways to get you better at playing.  While it is different than the way we used to learn, once you get the hang of it, you can pick up the notes coming at you fairly well, and I have only played it for one day.  Once you know the song you can jam along and really is awesome. 

Akijo
Akijo

For those who wonder, Im using a Bose sound system with an HDMI cable and I've never noticed any lag in the sound

zpluffy
zpluffy

Are you still able to play original songs, such as the ones you bought for the first Rocksmith, in 2014

profanityVP
profanityVP

so not having played the first one, i picked this up. 

as someone who is used to tabs, i found the interface hard to adjust, as its coming towards you as apposed to left to right, 

i think the best way to learn still, is from actually learning the tabs, and then practising by playing along in this game,, 

but as far as learning a song u have never heard of thru rocksmith, it might be difficult as everything moves too fast and u don't have time to learn the fingering and positioning before the next notes are played

Slim_Lyrics
Slim_Lyrics

Damn you Mark Walton for introducing me to Muse and Knights of Cydonia. I can't stop listening to it now.

johnnypogo
johnnypogo

Fuck yeah Mark, You're damn well decent at that there guitar!

profanityVP
profanityVP

just picked up my pre order during a work break,

 now i have to work for another 5 hours or so before i can play it, 


zeeshu
zeeshu

So the real tone cable from tje last game will workperfectly or did they make the new cable for this version?

fireemblemgamer
fireemblemgamer

unless they've fixed that game-breaking freezing bug on the ps3 version I won't touch it. 

Don't get me wrong, I love playing rocksmith. But there is nothing more frustrating than getting to the last song in a 30 minute set and having the game freeze up on you, making you redo everything. 

ugh. 

bob_on_bass
bob_on_bass

I have to agree with the minority of reviewers who don't find Rocksmith helpful for learning how to play REAL guitar (or bass).

I am an intermediate bass player.  I have not tried 2014, but I plugged my bass into the original Rocksmith (PC version).  The fundamental skill necessary to play the game has not changed since the original version; you have to fret without looking at the fretboard...  because you're watching the colored blocks on the screen.  Sure, expert bassists eventually get to where they can play without looking at the fretboard, but that's NOT a skill necessary for the novice to learn to play the instrument.  In fact, it's unnecessarily frustrating to have to figure out how to play 'blind.'

So, yeah, I can play some semi-decent bass.  But using my bass as a game controller is NOT the same as playing music on it.

Does Rocksmith teach skills necessary to play the instrument?  I guess you could say that...  you're using your fingers to fret notes and pluck strings.  That's like playing, right?  But after "learning" to play a song on the original Rocksmith well enough to get a passing score and move on, I turned off the game and tried to play the same song by myself.  No joy.  I hadn't really learned to play the song, I just became proficient at hitting notes that corresponded with colored blocks on the screen.  No colored blocks = no song.

I'll still probably get Rocksmith 2014, maybe after a year on a weekend deal on Steam.  I won't be counting on it to teach me to be a better bass player, just for something fun and different to do with my bass.

The majority of 'Rocksmith is great!' reviews come from people who claim that the game really taught them how to play guitar!  Well, not really.  Rocksmith taught you how to use your guitar to play a game.  Nothing wrong with that, but don't confuse hitting colored blocks with playing music.  It's kinda like learning to be an artist by doing paint-by-number pictures.  Sure, you're using a paint brush and different colors...  you're learning painting skills and you have a wonderful picture when you're done, but take away the outline and numbers and see how you do.  It's kinda like that.

I'll say that Rocksmith won't make you a worse guitar player.  And if you have fun playing it, that's really the point of a game, right?

Quarkzquarkz
Quarkzquarkz

You didn't mention if it comes with a guitar? Can we use any guitar? Can we use acoustic ? etc etc =(

DuaneDog
DuaneDog

I think this is almost a must have for a beginning guitar player. I've played guitar for over 15 years and I'm a professional musician. So much of getting up the curve of learning a guitar Rocksmith does quite well. Once you have been playing for a while and have years in, know your bar cords, and you get to become a 'good' player... well Rocksmith is more just kind of a nice diversion. It's like the better you get the less Rocksmith is going to be the answer to improving.

My primary caution regarding Rocksmith is you can still be quite sloppy and still Rocksmith will give you a pass on 'hitting' the note. I can see people who don't really work on their ear training and critically listening to their playing thinking they are playing 'right' when they could in fact sound like total garbage. And beginning musicians (and nearly all young musicians) often struggle anyway with the belief that if they manage to hit the note then they are playing well and sounding good. There are tons of players that play the 'right' notes but they don't sound any good at all. Just go to any Karaoke night at a club.

Areyal
Areyal

Very excited about this revamped version. Awesome list of songs and interface much smoother than before. 

zillaman101
zillaman101

Dude awesome! This game looks way better than the first game!!! I'm buying this ASAP

Faye_Tallity
Faye_Tallity

This game is too cool! My body is ready!  : DDD  

superjenius
superjenius

One thing that turned me off to the original Rocksmith (i.e. I never tried it) is that I heard the backing track includes the original guitar.  Has that changed in the new version?  Any option to turn that off and play with the band?

masfima1
masfima1

always wanted to play guitar, gonna give this a shot

7776594
7776594

I own the original Rocksmith and just got the new one today. I'm a bass player and have had a blast with the original game. I didn't like the career mode, it just seemed silly so I pretty much ditched it and having to tune after each song was a pain but overall I have vastly improved my playing. Beats the hell out of the old days when I'd listen to a song on cassette, (ya I'm that old) try to figure out a section, rewind, try to figure out a bit more, etc.  I plan on starting the new game tomorrow and told my wife she would not see me for two days unless she came to my studio. I only  hope there will be a way to import the songs from the original to the new game for the Playstation based version.  Really looking forward to the new interface and seeing my skills improve. 


nico_p
nico_p

I was pretty hesitant on getting the first Rocksmith but I'm getting this one for sure. I've been playing guitar for 10 years now but I've never really gotten "pro" at it. My finger are pretty fast and I can do simple solos and can do lead on a lot of songs but I can't seem to nail the really good ones like songs from Metallica, Iron Maiden, etc.. I think it's because I have weird fingers. I'm hoping this will help me out.. :)

BTW Nice review Mark.

realguitarhero5
realguitarhero5

I've been playing guitar for over a decade and I'm considering buying this, but it sounds like I shouldn't?

malad
malad

Thanks for the review. I have the first Rocksmith and I can't wait to get this one.

profanityVP
profanityVP

the best feature for me is session made, 

i doubt i'd learn thru this medium as much as i would thru just tabs and songsterr.com and just practising the traditional way. 

blackbeltjones
blackbeltjones

@zpluffy Yup... The ones downloaded you keep... for the ones on the disc it is 10 bucks but you had to own the original.

malad
malad

@zeeshu I got a cable for the original PS3 game. It works on the Xbox and on the PC.

Silentme
Silentme

@fireemblemgamer they have fixed it seems everything. all systems are working fine except some porting issues on Pc which they are working on. I feel your pain but its not an issue anymore, that I have had or heard of anyway.

7776594
7776594

@bob_on_bass  I dunno. I use it for playing bass, having been a bass player years ago. I was never great before, but was in a couple of gargage bands. After a decade long hiatus it seemed Rocksmith helped me get up to speed faster than I would have without it.   I also don't have a problem with having to look at the screen to see the colored blocks. I find it sufficient to just glance down at the neck from time to time in the more complex parts to be sure I am where I should be. As for learning the song, I don't expect a passing score on the game to mean I learned the song. I can read music (treble clef, on another instrument) and when I can play through the sheet music of a song I do not expect that to mean I have memorized it.  Same goes for Rocksmith. You have to play the song over and over until you are sick of it before you even begin to really know it. As for adding the nuances that make it music, that also comes with tons of more practice and playing with other people.  I like that I don't have to fight my way through a cd listening and experimenting to figure out a song. I can put in Rocksmith and play at some level immediately. One still needs to train one's ear to break down a song and transcribe it oneself, but golly isn't Rocksmith fun and as you said that is really the point. Still, while I agree you won't learn how to be a musician from Rocksmith, its a darn good start and makes starting out a lot less tedious. 


blackbeltjones
blackbeltjones

@bob_on_bass "Does Rocksmith teach skills necessary to play the instrument?  I guess you could say that...  you're using your fingers to fret notes and pluck strings.  That's like playing, right?  But after "learning" to play a song on the original Rocksmith well enough to get a passing score and move on, I turned off the game and tried to play the same song by myself.  No joy.  I hadn't really learned to play the song, I just became proficient at hitting notes that corresponded with colored blocks on the screen.  No colored blocks = no song."


If you thought a "passing" score would help you memorize and learn to play "easier" you would certainly be mistaken. It will still take the time and muscle memory to remember what to play. Thats what master mode was for. When you played enough to where you actually knew what was coming next before it got there you went to master mode to hone that knowledge. Rocksmith 2014 actually has on-the-fly master mode so if you forget a few notes, the chords and notes will start to fade back in to help you out and as you start to master it again it will fade out. Only thing Rocksmith doesnt teach is the "WHYS". Like "Why do these notes sound good with this chord?" "Why does this chord not fit with the scale i am using?" Those are things that can be learned elsewhere. Rocksmith will teach you to play the guitar but it certainly is not the end all be all of guitar learning. It's up to you to take that basic knowledge and expand on it. 

pa_amb_tomaquet
pa_amb_tomaquet

@bob_on_bass I agree with you that using you guitar as a controller is very different than playing it as an instrument. But once you 100% the song you can pretty much just jam on the song.

Silentme
Silentme

@Quarkzquarkz You can use anything that plugs in with a standard 1/4 inch plug which the other end is usb for your Ps3/Xbox/PC. I very basic low end guitar will do the trick. I picked up a nice used fender strat for 100 bucks at guitar center and couldn't be happier. Even though Bob on bass says you have to play blind... that's a good thing to learn to play without having to look at your hands all the time and is no different then looking at tabs and then looking down and playing the notes. The game slowly gets faster as you get better to accommodate for this. I may not be able to play a Dimebag Darrell Solo but I can see myself improving every time I play only really having to look down when a solo comes up because it is not as often that you play the 19th fret on any string, and the game gives you time to look before the note pops up...

I over answered your question but oh well:)

nazart81
nazart81

@DuaneDog You are totally right dude, I'm a begginer and I turned down the volume on the track so I can hear myself playing and I sound like shit, but I hit the notes "right" according to the game. I need more practice I guess.

Silentme
Silentme

@superjenius you can turn your guitar up or down. the original music will always be there but you can have your loud enough to drown I out if you want. On Pc anyway. I know nothing of console versions.

Silentme
Silentme

@7776594 10 bucks to import or relicense the original content and all DLC carries over of course.

conquerorsaint
conquerorsaint

@7776594 I heard they were charging a minimal fee on PSN to import the tracks from the original RS disc, not sure if it's implemented on day 1 or future update/patch

blackbeltjones
blackbeltjones

@nico_p Might be worth it to pick up the original if not for only getting the 50 songs on it to use in the 2014 version. I have seen the original at Walmart for 19.99 and for 10 more dollars you can "download" the original songs. Didnt realize how big the songlist would wind up with all my dlc and songs from the first plus all the songs from the 2014 version and the 8 new tracks for DLC....

humanji
humanji

@realguitarhero5 I've only played the previous one, but as a guitarist (albeit a not very good one) I thought it was pretty cool.  It's a little awkward to get used to how the music is displayed, but if you keep at it, you get the hang of it.  This version sounds like they addressed a lot of the problems the previous one had, so it should be a smoother experience (once you get the hang of it).

blackbeltjones
blackbeltjones

@profanityVP Session mode certainly is pretty good for messing around once you figure it out. Chords dont sound too good with session mode but it is great for learning how to solo and keeping the timing with a band. Shows the scale in whichever key you choose. The adaptability of the session band is decent enough and I played for two hours with "the band" before i realized it.

malad
malad

@zeeshu Oh, works on the new version as well. :)

Silentme
Silentme

@humanji @realguitarhero5 steam and uplay are full of people on the forums who are brand new and very experienced. You wont here a bad thing from any of them. Us newbs are learning but the pros are having weekly contests and stuff and having fun learning new songs along the way

peeger
peeger

@blackbeltjones @profanityVP What is great, is when you play on your own and just go off memory or from tab, you don't get timing right, which is sooo important in music.  By being able to play along even if you don't play every note or are jamming in session, you are keeping time.  That alone is worth 100x the practice time alone would give.  I learned to play about 30 years ago, and learned alone with a cassette and in my room.  When I finally played with others in a band, I learned more in one day than I did in a year alone.  This gives you that same experience, being able to jam and learn how to riff on the fly is a great tool.  While the interface is probably a bit tough for us old school guys, I think it comes to you pretty quick.  Once you really start reading the monitor and your fingers start playing the fret board off the monitor, I can really see this being incredible to learn new songs quickly. 

blackbeltjones
blackbeltjones

@peeger @blackbeltjones @profanityVP I have been "playing" and learning for 8 years myself. I can play chords like no ones business but I have never been able to "solo". The session mode has shown me soooo much in the first week alone. I actually find myself playing the session mode for hours on end and maybe one or two songs. When I went to play a bit with two guys from my work who have a band I found it funny how they had me start playing and they followed me. From my time with the session mode I am finally starting to see how they did it. It wasnt magic like I thought, lol. This game may not make me Jimi Hendrix but it is sure helping me feel a little closer to being competent. I think session mode for me is well worth the price of admission.

Rocksmith 2014 Edition More Info

First Release on Oct 22, 2013
  • Xbox 360
  • PlayStation 3
  • + 2 more
  • PC
  • Macintosh
Rocksmith 2014 Edition lets players plug in any electric guitar or bass directly into your system and begin learning guitar with the Rocksmith Method.
7.7
Average User RatingOut of 36 User Ratings
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Developed by:
Ubisoft
Published by:
Ubisoft
Genres:
Music/Rhythm
Content is generally suitable for ages 13 and up. May contain violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling and/or infrequent use of strong language.
Teen
All Platforms