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Review

Remember Me Review

  • Game release: June 3, 2013
  • Reviewed: June 3, 2013
  • X360

Remember Me never comes into its own, but it's an entertaining and attractive adventure all the same.

by

Within Remember Me, there's an outstanding game struggling to be set free, held back by a story that never takes off and claustrophobic levels that never allow the fantastic near-future setting to take center stage. Remember Me is not the game its world and premise hint that it could have been; rather, it's simply a good third-person action game: entertaining, slickly produced, and flavorful enough to keep you engaged to the end of its six-hour run time. It also stars a great heroine who is both powerful and vulnerable, allowing her to stand out in an intriguing world of corporate influence and lurking danger.

That world is centered on the Paris of the future, where technology has allowed us to exchange and purchase memories, perhaps to replace painful memories with pleasant ones, or to share intimate recollections with friends and lovers. But of course, such power over human emotion also proves dangerous, and happy memories can be bought and abused like drugs, or even stolen and corrupted. Remember Me's opening moments show you the dark side of Neo-Paris, dropping you into a macabre science facility, and forcing you to share the young protagonist's fear and confusion.

Nilin is her name, and guided by the voice in her ear, she escapes into the welcoming arms of a separatist movement called the Errorists. As it turns out, she is a messiah of sorts to its members, though it isn't immediately clear just why she's such an important part of this group's plans. And so as Nilin, you set off to free the populace from the tyranny of the technology that has led to such abuse, and to fell the corporation that controls it. You also seek to recover your lost past. Who are you? What events led to this moment? Can you trust the words of this mysterious Edge, whose voice guides you from one objective to the next?

This is a fantastic premise, and occasionally, Remember Me makes good on it. The chilling opening is one such example, though late-game developments prove poignant as well, revealing how personal pain can lead to far-reaching consequences for the ones we love--and even for entire cultures. In between, however, Remember Me falls into a rut, leaning on typical video game tropes, the voice in your ear leading you from one objective to the next with only a few words of exposition to motivate you. Nilin even makes a crack about being a simple errand runner, and all too often, that's the role you play.

What a wonderful place Neo-Paris is. What a pity you don't get to see more of it.

Elsewhere, corny dialogue and forced metaphors dull the story's edge. When Nilin plaintively calls out to a fellow Errorist codenamed "Bad Request" using only "Bad," as though it's his first name, it's hard to take the story seriously. Nilin herself is the common narrative element that pulls you through in the face of loopy writing. Her ability to change memories at will, and her tendency to kick major butt in hand-to-hand combat, make her an appealing game lead, but it's her strength in the face of a vague past and an uncertain future that makes her an intriguing individual. Nilin is wonderfully voiced, betraying her fear in harsh whispers and crying out in anger when the burden is too great to bear.

The world, too, provides phenomenal possibilities, only to reveal itself as a façade, rather than the well-defined setting it seems to be. Neo-Paris is a gorgeous mix of the traditional and the advanced. Café patrons sit at wrought-iron tables, while behind them, high-style skyscrapers reach into the clear cerulean sky. At one point, you collide with a busy shopper on your travels--but that shopper is not a fashionably dressed Parisian, but a fashionably dressed Parisian's android, frantically running errands for its demanding owner. Remember Me's second half leaves behind its most evocative sights for more mundane environments, but even so, the production values remain typically expert. Ambient lighting brings an eerie beauty to subterranean corridors, and digital glitches appear to remind you of the gaps in your memory. Audio glitches appear in the superb musical soundtrack, as well, taking on particular power when the musical score slows or hastens in accordance with your on-screen actions.

It's a shame that you never get a chance to explore this world to any notable degree. Remember Me is one of the most linear, guided games in recent memory, giving you little choice but to wander down its narrow paths until you reach the next battle, the next cutscene, or the next scripted platforming sequence. "Linear" needn't be a bad thing, of course, and plenty of games lead you from point A to point Z with little room to breathe in between. Yet Remember Me stands out as a particularly egregious example of tightly controlled roller-coaster design, in spite of the few nooks hiding various collectibles. Some areas are so confined that the camera fails to find a good angle, and the paths you follow are so narrow that you long to break free. In the meanwhile, you look into the distance, aching to investigate the inviting Neo-Parisian sights and realizing you are an outsider looking in rather than a true part of this incredible place.

What you remember may not be how it actually happened.

Give yourself over to this theme-park ride, however, and you'll have a good time. Remember Me takes on a predictable but comfortable rhythm of scripted platforming, melee combat, and light puzzle solving. The leaping and climbing take a clear cue from the Uncharted series, the game always leading you in the single direction towards your destination. Visual cues always shows the path; the fun comes not from the true dangers of navigation, but from the camera angles that highlight the deep chasms beneath you and the gorgeous Neo-Parisian architecture. A few platforming stretches impart a sense of urgency, having you evade an aircraft's gunfire, or hurrying along ledges being periodically electrified. But for the most part, Remember Me's platforming isn't likely to challenge you, only to stimulate your eyes and ears.

Actually, Remember Me isn't challenging in general, though you are still likely to be entertained by its combat. On its topmost level, beating up your foes is a relatively shallow button-mashing affair, but the melee combat has a few extra twists to keep it from falling into a rut. Nilin looks good in battle, tumbling, punching, and kicking with ease, each blow landing with a nice thud. You can string individual attacks into combos, and it's here that Remember Me makes its first effort to set its gameplay apart from the pack: you can create your own combos out of individual attacks called pressens. Some attacks focus on damage, while others provide you with healing or recharge the meter that allows you to perform special abilities.

Remember Me's combat isn't spectacular, but it's still good for a kick.

It's a neat system, but it's less exciting than initially meets the eye. You only get a few combo templates to work with, and you unlock new pressens slowly, so the potential of the craft-your-own-combos mechanic is never fully exploited. But the nature of certain attacks, the self-heal in particular, gives some battles a modicum of tactical dimension. Some powerful corporate guards deal damage each time you make contact, which makes that self-heal an important part of your combos. Meanwhile, a ranged gadget you collect early on allows you to knock memory-addicted leapers off of walls and fire energy charges at robots vulnerable to them. Crowded encounters and boss fights give you a good chance to break out special attacks, such as an area-wide stun, and a bomb that you can attach to unsuspecting freaks.

Battle is rarely difficult, though it does take on a nice rhythm, particularly in the final hours, when you have a greater selection of attacks at your disposal. As with the platforming, Remember Me's combat is more interested in pleasing your senses than it is in providing depth. The camera frequently closes in to show you planting a destructive bomb, or to showcase the final kick in your longest combo. It's fun to feel like a participant in a sci-fi action film, but you can't always find a good view when the tight spaces get crowded with foes. In fact, the camera might even break, forcing you to restart at the most recent checkpoint so you can regain control. You might need to contend with other bugs as well; you can break a couple of environmental puzzles if you aren't careful, for instance, or a scripted event following a boss fight might not trigger, forcing you to replay the final stretch of that battle again. Bugs aren't enormously common, but Remember Me's highly scripted design makes such hitches seem a little more egregious than they might have been in a more flexible game.

The boss fights are enjoyable in spite of their relative ease.

Puzzles and stealth sections break up the pace nicely, though neither element is all that engaging on its own. You use your wrist device to manipulate sliding platforms, open doors, and transfer power from one door lock to another, and every so often, you need to move past roaming sentry bots without entering their danger zone. None of this proves very intellectually engaging however, with one exception: puzzles that require you to interpret mnemonics, and then manipulate objects accordingly. Not only do these few puzzles require a bit of brain power (provided you ignore the game's insistence on telling you the answer if you take too long), but also tie nicely into the narrative.

Remember Me's brightest spark, however, is emitted when Nilin enters and manipulates someone's memory in an effort to change their present state of mind. These sequences lead to a few of the game's more impactful narrative events, though they're best not analyzed too much, less the plot start to seem too nonsensical. More importantly, memory manipulation is Remember Me's most well-developed gameplay concept. Once you view the event as it originally occurred, you rewind and forward through the scene, seeking the telltale static indicating that you can interact with an object. You might move a piece of furniture, drop a cigarette, unfasten a safety belt, or move a firearm. Adjust the scene in just the right way, and you will change the past--or at least, the past as remembered by the mind you have manipulated--to accommodate the present you require.

Glimpsing Neo-Paris for the first time is a powerful moment.

Your attempts to properly shape another's memories may not go right the first few times, but the scene will still change based on your actions. The ensuing events may even lead to your subject's inadvertent death, or maybe just the innocuous fall of an object to the floor. It's intoxicating to watch an entire cinematic morph around your attempts to solve the puzzle at hand, and the final memory manipulation makes use of a delightful concept you must experience for yourself to appreciate. Disappointingly, Remember Me offers too few chances to concoct new memories for others.

The scarcity of memory manipulation isn't Remember Me's only disappointing element, yet there are just enough great ideas bubbling under its surface to give this adventure some heat. Nilin is the best reason to make this game a future memory: she's resolute, conflicted, and all too human, making her a terrific escort through this beautiful and underutilized world. Remember Me is a good game loaded with intriguing ideas; here's hoping that its sequel, should we ever have one, rides these ideas to greatness.

The Good
Great protagonist that makes it easy to get invested in her destiny
Manipulating memories is a stimulating process
Attractive near-future world
Fun, fluid combat
The Bad
Constricted level design keeps the world from coming to life
Story rarely makes good on the cool premise
Camera frequently gets in the way
7
Good
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Discussion

907 comments
pip3dream
pip3dream

Just finished this game tonight - and while it's not a master piece, this game clearly had a lot of love, passion, and hard work put into it.  The visuals are breathtaking, the setting is just awesome - I loved it, and there was some real slick design work put into this game.  Lots of attention to detail.  I'm a little old school, so i don't freak out if a game is too linear - which this game is. It's okay,  I enjoyed moving through the environment, and playing the Nilin character.  The story wasn't super amazing, but it hit the right notes in places, and was acted really well and with heart.  I really enjoyed the memory remix scenes and I'm not mad there weren't more of them... those scenes are a ton of work production wise I'm sure.  Really cool, very fluid, I even really loved the combat of the game.  It was fun.  I really enjoyed my time with this game and when it ended I wasn't quite ready to leave it's world.  

valdarez
valdarez

Good review, though I slightly disagree with the camera angels being a problem.  When walking around the world, they never get in the way, and when fighting, you're in full control, so if you find a problem with a corner and camera angle, then simply stay out of the corner.  Sometimes an ounce of common sense can solve a pounds worth of problem.

This game is beautiful to behold, well written, scripted, and the voice over work is superb.  The accompanying sound track is so amazing at times I find myself simply stopping to enjoy the moment in a world whose detail is beyond any game in recent memory. 

For older gamers, they will find that Remember Me brings back the same feelings encountered when playing Flashback on the original Sega Genesis all those years ago in the early 90's. 

Serious gamers looking for a unique and fulfilling game experience should not pass this one up.

FreeRPGer
FreeRPGer

This game should not pass by as unknown, as it turned out to be  very good IMO—not a hit, but very good. I can tell there is someone on this design team DONTNOD that worked on Heavy Rain.

I’m not finished with it yet, but nearing the end, and its getting more & more interesting. Starting out with its strengths, I’ll say that story-wise, it draws a little inspiration from Total Recall with the “memory” thing, but then takes it somewhere way beyond that into its own territory. 

Gameplay-wise, the fighting isn't perfect, but I found it gets progressively better as she learns more and more combos. When executed correctly, they are very rewarding and can be fluid. It gets interesting to work with, in that there is healing and hurting combos, to name a couple.  On another level of gameplay, the Memory Remix is fun to adjust -- literally going in and manipulating memories.

I only have one complaint: the camera can go haywire if you back into a wall or something while fighting. But other than that, a couple of the boss fights I found to be very original, especially Madame.  I give this game an 8.2 easy. Don’t let it pass you by if you’re into sci fi or beat ‘em ups.

zeifel
zeifel

To be honest, when Nilin just reached the Neo-Paris surface, I thought this game is an open-world.. but it wasn't. I tried to jump down a random ledge but nothing happened. I began playing on Saturday, finished it on Sunday and couldn't help saying "that's all?" The gameplay felt quite shallow... I felt like playing a FPS minus the guns and explosions.

I love the remixing though, I expected a couple more of such setpieces. The Madame boss battle was also memorable, to me she deserves to be the final or penultimate boss. Overall still I'd say the game is greater than the sum of its parts. 6.5 or 7.0 is a fair score.

dudnaito
dudnaito

in what universe does this game have "fun, fluid combat?" I thought it was atrocious. 

hitomo
hitomo

this game Plays like Dragons.Lair ... no joke ... its an incoherent illogical mess ... graphics are really bad on the second look, they realy sacraficed to much for the ambient occlusion, for instance good shadowing ... the main Protagonist, god, talks and acts like a weak child, does everything she is told by a mysterious Person speaking into her head despite having all her memorize wiped ... and all of a sudden she starts to beat up heavy armored men ... give me a break ... the combat System is pure buttonmashing to fill meters to enter states of more advanced button mashing ... all the memorie altering minigames are gimicks and nothing more ... nice ideas ... total fail in execution ... typical French game

Sulima
Sulima

Just finished the game and I really enjoyed it. I thought it was great actually. A fun combat game with great graphics. I did not feel any camera issues (you have full control of the camera at most times). It is linear indeed but so are most games of this type (uncharted, GOW, etc.). Story is good, memory remixes are a lot of fun, and fighting is relatively easy once you figure out what works on what boss. Plus the ability to make your own combos is a great idea.

kenpachi212
kenpachi212

This game is awesome, I have been having super fun with it plus it brings something different to gamers. I would rate 8 or 8.5. You all should stop trying to play being critics, you suck at it.

MilkyChocolate
MilkyChocolate

Am I the only one whose protagonist seems to be on drugs? Whenever there's two ledges(one above the other), she always seems to drop automatically no matter what I do. What the hell?

amroto
amroto

i've actually just began playing it, been through only the first 2 episodes and so far i really like the idea of this one although there are some minor flaws that could have made this game a much better one...but i'll definitely play it till the end because i'm anxious to know the ending & it's very interesting manipulating ppl's memories, it's very dynamic

KorhalKk
KorhalKk

For real ? This game is exactly how it was reviewed. Camera CONSTANTLY gets in the way, shakes like hell and does not allow dodging, specially in boss fights. So 7 is a cool rating, because I would expect more freedom and not this linear game with the camera fighting against you ... very irritating.

KSSuperhero
KSSuperhero

Played through this and a 7 seems a little high, its not bad but its not great either. It has some fun parts but it has alot of parts that are just boring. The combat is very boring were the parts were you mess with peoples memories are great but there is only around 4 of those. This is a solid 5 at the most it works it looks great but its just bland from a play standpoint .

MaskRisen
MaskRisen

Only thing I'm going to remember is that box art.

saosebastiao
saosebastiao

Metacritic, a 69, you naughty, naughty people...

DjTIEST0
DjTIEST0

the erorist hahaha epic name well the game looks good to me 

shruteshkumar
shruteshkumar

Am round 4-5 hours in and am definitely loving this one; true its completely linear, but the visuals are stunning, the soundtrack is amazing and the fighting is fun (I hardly play fighting games); only hitch is with the camera that seems to have a mind of its own :P

Probably have not reached the 'wtf' moments that made Kevin bring this one to a 7 :)


SoljaD2005
SoljaD2005

So I see how GS rating these games now; The games in which score higher when review by others, is scale lower on this site because of the person giving the review point out things they WISH was on the game. The game should be rated base on whats IN THE GAME and HOW IT PLAYS, not "aww I wish it was a open world in this game because it's so pretty" -1 point 

the_big_doggg
the_big_doggg

Does every game this site reviews get a 7 or 8?

IcemanX5
IcemanX5

I cant wait for Super Remember Me: Arcade Edition

amdreallyfast
amdreallyfast

That music sounds like it could be the soundtrack to an old Star Trek film.  I like it.

jimrhurst
jimrhurst

Kevin is definitely the best writer on Gamespot, IMO.  I don't play enough games to be able to make fair comparisons on his scoring, but his comments always seem very insightful as well.  Its too bad that leads me to the inevitable, cynical conclusion that he won't be around here much longer.  A little too good at this to stay around writing game reviews.

jtboldo
jtboldo

Just 7.0? It deserves at least a 9.0! The plot is amazing, fighting is fun and stimulating, and the memory mixing process is something TRULY unique in gaming. Its true the camera gets in the way sometimes, but hey! It's a Capcom game! What to expect?

hitomo
hitomo

@FreeRPGer ... the Combo System was somehow the mainselling Point for me, but look, the Problem is, that regardless how Long the Combo is. the Timing bewtween hits is always the same ... so you never Need to pay Attention to the actual Animation or postion or what the Opponent is doing, you only Need to maintain the Timing and look out for red marks .. the only skillelement is the through in of the dodge move ... but honestly, during combat you look at the bar at the buttom of the Screen and while the combat can be rewarding, it never gets much better then being a mere quicktime Event ...

and then imagine an open world like gamedesign where elments like Memory Remix and remembrancec are random Actions you can Trigger on all NPC in the game, finding secrets and hidden quests or storylines in that way

this game, no, the ideas behind this game had so much potential and in regards to this, the actual game is a total fail ...

hitomo
hitomo

@zeifel I also find the Madame Boss the most memorable ... honestly, the game should start with Episode 4 for and then build up from there ...

Bayonetta2013
Bayonetta2013

@dudnaito Many people think the combat was the best part. It is fluid. Hence the dodge button that allows you to keep your combo going. 

Just because you disagree doesn't mean you're right.

valdarez
valdarez

@dudnaito I love the combat, which makes good use of customized combinations and timing for attack and dodge.  Going from one attack, to the next, and then dodging, and starting again, is as fluid as it was in Batman Arkham games.  That's fluid.

jecomans
jecomans

@dudnaito I wasn't thrilled either. I also didn't get why such a short game absolutely demands you do everything so quickly. I put the controller down during a puzzle element to drink some tea and it seemed like only seconds before the game was telling me what to do. 

It would have been better if the devs spent less money on the 'production values' and released it as a PSN game.

valdarez
valdarez

@hitomo Play like Dragon's Lair? Fail.  Did you even play this game?

Bayonetta2013
Bayonetta2013

@KorhalKk The camera does not shake. Ever. Unless you plant a Logic Bomb and I think it briefly shakes for effect. Other than that, no, it's just you. You have control over the camera, so if you have problems, it's probably your own fault.

KorhalKk
KorhalKk

Its because its Kevin. Sometimes he gets very cruel, but often he strikes critical, to the point.

narutit
narutit

@the_big_doggg It's just this site review everything. From the story to the gameplay. Like everything. So yeah, most games are 7 & 8.

Nick_Fury_Shine
Nick_Fury_Shine

@the_big_doggg It sounds more realistic, there are no perfect games and the Gold age of games passed, so everything is a bit more mature and conservative. However Gamespot like any review site has a benefactor, I leave the imagination to do the rest, but yes I think 7 and 8 max a 9 is what it should be, a 10 is either godlike status or extreme fanboy status.

Thyasianman
Thyasianman

@jtboldo Alright. Go ahead and rate the game a 9.0 then. It's his professional opinion. He's not making reviews based on anybody elses opinion other than his. The world needs to learn to not complain about game scores because there will always be a person who disagrees with a game score. 

Bayonetta2013
Bayonetta2013

@hitomo @FreeRPGer No, the combat is not that simple. "Skill" comes from the ability to make smart Pressens that are balanced and don't get you killed. And it's more than a QTE event, lol.

The amount of memory remixes they included was perfect. Quality, not quantity, bud.

FreeRPGer
FreeRPGer

@hitomo ... I agree that they should run with some of the good ideas in this game, and leave out its flaws. But hopefully they can grow from that and listen to fans. 

Honestly, I am coming up on the last boss fight, and I really like this game - alot. It has flaws, like the camera goes haywire when backing into a wall while fighting, and then not being able to see your health until you're standing next to a healing SAT station. But other than those things, I think this game is an accomplishment they can grow from. 

I'll forgive DONTNOD's little imperfections, seeing as its their first game. Like I said, hopefully they grow with the idea and listen to fans like us.

dudnaito
dudnaito

@jecomans

As much as I normally respect Kevin's opinions, I seriously question how he defines "fluid." It's not even "not fluid;" it's downright wooden with the protagonist standing perfectly still until the strike lands with no real transitional animation in between. She runs up to the opponent, stands in front of them completely upright, then bashes them pressing one button after the other. Pretty adamant, I'm just right as opposed to this simply being a difference in opinion. Not even the combat, movement, platformng, everything is wooden. Look to uncharted series, tomb raider, assassin's creed, or basically... any other action-oriented game to show what fluid means. 


And yeah, completely agree with you... seriously getting tired of being told where to go constantly. I actually don't mind a static storyline with one ending- in fact, i prefer it- but at least let me move around a little a la Bioshock Infinite. 


The only plus is, I liked the world they created, the memory changing thing was interesting, which made it all the more baffling that after the first "memory remix," you have to wait for the next one longer than you'd think. Instead of immersing yourself in the storyline and excellent world with its ethical quandaries, you get to fight some doofus called X-Mas who isn't even fleshed out in one of the worst boss battles I've played in a long long long time. 


Jesus, I'm not really even a "gamer" per se and I rarely leave any comments... maybe twice a year. I come to gamespot more out of habit than anything else and use it as a "news source" for games, but this is just about the first time I read a review piece and thought wtf.. i need to rant a little. BTW, game has been promptly uninstalled. There was potential there somewhere. Damn shame. 

jecomans
jecomans

@dudnaito I find it hard to accept that the person who thought of the idea and explained it to the studio head had anything to do with the finished product. 

Let us go play something else. 


Remember Me More Info

First Release on Jun 03, 2013
  • Xbox 360
  • PlayStation 3
  • PC
Remember Me is a third person sci-fi action adventure set in Neo-Paris, 2084 where players take on the role of Nilin, a former elite memory hunter with the ability to break into people's minds and steal or even alter their memories. After having her own memory wiped clean by the authorities, players must help Nilan set out on a mission to recover her identity while being hunted by the very people that created this surveillance society.
7.2
Average User RatingOut of 885 User Ratings
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Developed by:
DONTNOD Entertainment
Published by:
Capcom
Genres:
3D, Action, Adventure, Open-World
Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
Mature
All Platforms