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Review

Disney Infinity Review

  • Game release: August 18, 2013
  • Reviewed:
  • X360

Animated madness

Disney Infinity is the tale of two games. One of those games is the Toybox, a gleefully entertaining shared space where you and a friend or three can mess around with your playthings, creating hedge mazes, playing football in turret-protected forts, and launching yourselves into the stratosphere with a series of air cannons. The other game is the sloppy mess that you must endure to get the most out of the Toybox, filled with glitches, shocking oversights, and fundamental design errors. The Disney Infinity experience is a tour through the highs and lows of video game design.

It's also a window into the wonders of modern game marketing. Disney Infinity isn't just a game, but a platform as well--in this case, a platform designed to keep you spending money. Like Skylanders, Infinity is as much about collecting toy figures as it is about playing a game. Your initial purchase includes three figurines, one each from the Disney worlds that make up the game's campaigns, called playsets. To enjoy a playset, or indeed any of Infinity's features, you need a plastic bauble that contains the worlds you wish to explore and a figurine to match, both of which you set on a tray you plug into your console. The three figures and playsets you initially receive get you started, but you soon learn that enjoying most of Infinity's content means forking over cash for new figures, new discs that grant your figures special powers, and other such trinkets.

Disney clearly knows both the emotional value of a quality action figure and the magnetic lure of collecting them, especially when the characters they represent have entered the pop culture lexicon. The figures are solidly constructed and remarkably detailed, and priced around 14 dollars at the time of this review. Davy Jones from the Pirates of the Caribbean films sports a mean claw, fearsome face-tentacles, and slanted eyes that mean business. Monsters University's Sulley is every bit the big galoomp you'd expect, posed in mid-stride with a sly grin spread across his face. It's a delight to look upon these figures, and because placing a figure on the stand associates it with your own game, Disney Infinity instills in these toys a strong sense of ownership, in-game and out.

After Infinity's initial introduction, it dumps you and your figure of choice into the Toybox with little sense of direction aside from some tooltips and tutorial voice-overs. It takes a bit of poking and prodding to find your way around the menus, and you'll probably want to explore one of the playsets first, which is the easiest way to unlock new toys to mess with. The Monsters University, Incredibles, and Pirates of the Caribbean worlds are represented--and sadly, they suffer in different ways, bogged down by botched details that are in some cases specific to a playset, and in other cases follow you through the entire game. Also bear in mind that while you can use any character you want in the Toybox, you can only explore a playset with a character from that world. So no, you cannot tour Monsters University with a cheeky Jack Sparrow, as fun as it sounds.

With friends like Randall, who needs enemies?

Perhaps Disney fears that such mixing and matching could damage the consistency of the worlds. But such a concern is laughable considering how Infinity breaks its own logic. In the Monsters University playset, for instance, you can play as Randall, at one point taking a mission from…yourself. When you accomplish story missions, prerendered cutscenes depict only Mike and Sulley, making you feel that a character you didn't even control, and never encountered in the game, is taking all the credit for your own deeds. Playing as Syndrome in the Incredibles playset, you must overlook that you will end up fighting yourself in the final showdown. These might seem like minor oversights, but the lack of tender loving care is apparent throughout every playset and beyond.

Take, for example, the Incredibles playset, which has you romping through the open city performing odd jobs for Edna Mode and the like while fending off increasingly powerful robots that constantly spawn near you. Infinity's combat is shallow but still mildly entertaining; whether you play as Violet, Mr. Incredible, or another character, melee blows have a fine sense of impact. But this playset's cloying need to drop enemies at your feet every 10 seconds becomes a hassle when you're trying to scale various buildings to reach a rooftop destination. Robots spawn in the middle of the air and drop to the streets beneath, shooting you down from the walls you're scaling with rocket barrages. Such moments aren't fun, particularly given this playset's vague (and sometimes nonexistent) waypoints and audiovisual cues.

Over at Monsters University, tedium is your biggest obstacle as you saunter about the campus shooting trees and statues with your toilet paper gun, and riding your rival university's mascot to glory. Many of the details are adorable, from the way fellow students giggle when you shoot them with your paintgun to the slick climbing animations that make it fun to scale pipes. But the repetition hits hard here--the repetition of treading back and forth through the tunnels that separate parts of the world; the repetition of the bullies that knock you around when you just want to open the gift-wrapped toys that you've purchased; and the repetition of the vocal prompts reminding you of two-headed Terri and Terry's whereabouts.

Jack Sparrow can't avoid the deadly kraken forever!

Perhaps the voice-over wouldn't be so annoying if the waypoints meant to lead you to the next mission giver would properly appear, but in Disney Infinity, things don't always work the way they are supposed to. That's even true in the Pirates of the Caribbean playset, which is easily the most refined of the three. Here, your time is split between land, where you slice up baddies with your sword, and sea, where you fire your ship's cannons at the pesky pirates that pester you. Sea battles are a blast, and there are a diverse number of activities--platforming, bomb-tossing, boat-rowing--to keep you satisfied.

The detailing is better in the Pirates set: waypoints work properly, and enemies don't attack you if you're in the middle of inescapable dialogue with another character. (That might seem like a gimme, but in the Incredibles playset, you can take damage even when the game has taken control from you.) Nevertheless, oddities still crop up: mission scripts can break and force you to restart the game, and in some areas, making a short leap from a ledge can cause you to respawn in your starting position, even though you can fall incredible distances elsewhere.

Escort mission, Disney style.

There are stand-alone missions too, including specific ones for each character you place on the stand. Such missions are uninspired and mirror the challenges available in the playsets: shooting paintballs, collecting giant orbs, and the like. Bringing a friend along online or locally adds a competitive edge to some of these standard tasks, so your attempt to collect orbs could be thwarted by a buddy intent on keeping you from them. But these adventures, too, are clearly unfinished; how else to explain a gaping hole in Randall's personal mission where the geometry isn't properly lined up, or areas where you can fall through the floor and into the limbo beneath?

You might be tempted to skip the playsets considering how many "Game Design 101" mistakes they make. And yet you need to scour these worlds for collectible goodies to use in the Toybox, which is where Disney Infinity soars. And to really get the most out of the game, you need to return to these places using other characters, because certain challenges and treasure boxes can be accessed only by certain characters. The Toybox thrives on your ability to fill it with stuff--and the more stuff you have, the more fun you have.

Where the playsets are a prime example of poor game design, the Toybox is a magical example of what happens when you let players come together and express their imaginations, just as kids do in a sandbox or on a playground. Don't mistake Disney Infinity for a game-creation tool like Little Big Planet; as of now, you can't download other players' creations or upload your own. Nor are you making games as you generally think of them, with rules, logic, and scripting. Instead, you place walls, objects, enemies, and all sorts of other toys using the logical construction interface, and do what comes naturally.

A digital toybox can get just as messy as a real one.

You and any invited buddies might start small, laying down tracks and racing on them, or placing platforms that set off fireworks when you step on them. Perhaps you set down some enemies and practice your swordfighting, or try your hand at connecting some rails for your favorite characters to slide on. But as your ideas grow, so does the fun. What starts as a little combat arena becomes a death trap laden with spiked platforms and laser-spewing turrets, with you and your partners trying to platform your way out while beating each other up. Laying down castle corridors could lead to an insane game of tag, but with every player using a gun that lets you grab opponents and raise them in the air. Expect to laugh, and laugh hard, as you and your friends crack each other up with your clever uses of launchers and landing pads.

In the Toybox, the unexpected abounds. A shrinking pad temporarily turns you tiny, so why not devise a jumping puzzle based around it? On the other hand, a growing pad makes you monstrous, allowing you to leap to greater heights, perhaps onto a platform where your buddy hid a helicopter for you to pilot. And should you drive a vehicle onto the growing pad, it morphs into a monster-truck version of itself, with a normal-size chassis and gargantuan wheels. What a lovely touch. Not so lovely is the moment when a friend attaches you to a vehicle and tows you away at a maddening pace in a hilarious effort to disrupt your plans. Disney Infinity's griefing potential is enormous, terrifying, and wonderful.

You can download some Disney-made toyboxes, but they're not that much fun to spend time in.

Yet even the Toybox doesn't escape trouble. In particular, the frame rate, a problem in the playsets, can slow to a crawl, even when there seems to be no obvious reason for it. More irritating is how the Toybox locks the majority of its toys behind a randomized spin, with you earning spins by exploring and interacting with the world. The purpose of the system is obvious: to keep you playing--and buying new figures--until you spin up what you want. But when you have your eyes on items that allow you to craft Rube Goldberg machines and instead receive a new kind of tree, it can be a little demoralizing.

What to make of Disney Infinity, a game of maddening lows and joyful highs? Few games are so erratically constructed, and even fewer games capture the delights of the playground, where you make the rules up as you go. It's a shame that the painstaking craftsmanship of the attractive figures isn't reflected in the slovenly playsets. Exercise caution before devoting your money and energy to Disney Infinity: this is not the star you wished upon.

The Good
The wonderful Toybox lets you exercise your imagination
Well-crafted figures instill a sense of ownership
Lots of delightful touches
The Bad
Buggy playsets loaded with fundamental design errors
Broken world logic
Frustratingly random unlock process
6
Fair
About GameSpot's Reviews

About the Author

Kevin VanOrd is a lifelong RPG lover and violin player. When he isn't busy building PCs and composing symphonies, he watches American Dad reruns with his fat cat, Ollie.

Discussion

122 comments
badwedgie00
badwedgie00

Does this game's create mode rival that of 'Little Big Planet' ? I'm thinking of buying this for my kids, but they want something that is as deep as LBP.

iowastate
iowastate

the problem is when this game starts it is because of the end of three beloved Disney MMOs that cause heartbreak for thousands of  fans both  young and old.

There is change.org petitions going to keep Toontown online and Pirates of the Caribbean alive  - both of these games have built up a fan base for over 10 years only to be shut down  to concentrate on Disney Infinity  - the Kids and grandkids love these games and are crying that they close for the lame toons of Infinity.

J4M35ROCK3R
J4M35ROCK3R

please do NOT get to us a princess playset (collection of dolls) or my daughter will drive my wallet to bankruptcy

Infigamer
Infigamer

@BlendThree You have some good points, but Disney's initial idea, for the Toy Box at least, was to let the player do their  own thing.  That way it never gets old.  The way I see it, as s

Even4life
Even4life

Oh, god. Gamespot strikes again.

Killermonkey97
Killermonkey97

Raise the score up a point if they actually put the John Carter franchise in the damn game.

APizzo667
APizzo667

What good are the toys from worlds that do not appear game? There is no Toy Story world, so Toy stories figures are only good in the sandbox party of a game? Just a question, not a critique on the game!

Hurvl
Hurvl

It doesn't matter what the reviews say, this is more financially potent than oil. Kids often can't control their "oooh, me want!"-impulses as good as adults, so the potential for making great loads of cash is as big as that with MMO's. Pairing Disney with games + toys sounds like a wickedly effective formula for success and it seems to have paid off going by some comments in another article.

BlendThree
BlendThree

I've got to agree with many of the reviewer's points and perhaps, though largely unmentioned, the biggest trouble with Infinity is a lack of objective clarity from front to back.  My initial experience was local multiplayer (with two of the included figures on the portal simultaneously) and while Player 1 was given the option to select Mastery Adventures (essentially tutorials) and Adventures (mini-games) from the Toy Box, neither player was given access to the true missions of the game.  These options were only displayed the next time through with a single character in the one player slot on the portal.


In short, option paralysis abounds here and children (who will likely make up the bulk of the target demographic) will be overwhelmed the moment running around the Toy Box (hub) grows old.  There's great promise here but the execution leaves a lot to be desired in my opinion.

alastor529
alastor529

Shoud have called this Pixar's Infinity,  All I seeare Pixar characters?
where is Mickey, donal goofy etc?

Cmon Kingdom hearts had more disney characters lmao

Ikthog
Ikthog

I think Kevin is making a bit too much out of a few small glitches, most of which don't really affect the gameplay. (Come on, you can fight yourself in fighting games and nobody whines about it, but here it ruins the game?) The relatively few negative reviews I've seen of Disney Infinity mostly revolve around similarly subjective and personal gripes, rather than any kind of substantive issues.

The play sets are not works of genius, it is true, but they are fun ways to spend a few hours in the worlds of the various Disney/Pixar characters. I agree with Kevin that the constant robot spawning in the Incredibles world is excessive, though they aren't that hard to avoid (or kill) and once you get a little further in, you find super recruits who will battle the robots for you.

The issue of the random Toy Box items is a bit more problematic. I'm fine with randomness, I think it makes it more fun, but when all items are equally weighted, you're just as likely to get a shrub or another set of little townspeople as you are that one crucial piece you need to make your whole world function. I'm hoping they correct that oversight and at least include the most crucial pieces in the starter set, and/or give you the ability to choose a certain number of pieces that you need. Those inspiring videos you see on YouTube, with crazy race tracks with AI opponents, and entire games created with the Toy Box logic tools -- great stuff, but you won't be doing any of that anytime soon, as you'll need to randomly be awarded all of the most basic logic tools to even get started. And that's where the money-grubbing part comes in -- you need more spins? No problem, just buy more characters!

That issue aside, I've been loving the game so far. Hopefully they will address the biggest issues soon, as it's a great product with huge potential.

JustPlainLucas
JustPlainLucas

Missing floors?  How is it in 2013 we're still seeing games where FLOORS aren't finished?

pip3dream
pip3dream

Well, so much for Disneys game division.

ilovetoontown
ilovetoontown

Disney STINKS.  They are closing down ToonTown and bringing up this piece of garbage game. ToonTown is a game for the whole family and it's a lot cheaper that Disney Infinity!!!!   I will never buy this game for my kids. They can play other games on the computer for free.

caseysrodeo
caseysrodeo

Well I think the game is amazing! I bought every charater available the first time around and will continue doing so. The amazing thing about the game itself is in my opinion is the sky seems to b the limit. My 5 year can relate to most of the characters as well as myself. I almost 50 and for myself the entertainment value is more than just spot on.

As far as the review goes, Im not sure he really knows what a true interaction between children and adults are. It really closes the gap and helps in solidifying that most adults are kids at heart and can remain feeling so thru their children.

The game itself is'nt meant to feel like Halo, Call of Duty, etc, etc,.....it's a game of interaction as well as helping your child or children develop their social skills as well as eye and hand coordination. The graphics r clean, game play is pretty awesome. There is alot to do to get from one point to the next. In speaking Im sure the the editor or writer of this review must play alot of GTA......In order to complete that game as well you have tasks that must be completed in order to finish.

Im sorry and I know it's my opinion but I totally disagree with review. I give a 9 plus...it's an adventure that is limited by ur imagination........

nait2k4
nait2k4

Well it sounds pretty cool, and the issues (apart from the self flagellation) can probably be patched pretty quickly. But at my age, if I go to the mall repeatedly to buy childrens toy figurines, I'm going to end up on a list that precludes me from living near schools.

nigelholden
nigelholden

I'm picking it for my 4 year old. But definitely a well though out review. If my kid was older, I may of skipped over this. Still, she's played it and loves running around as Sully, so that's all that really matters for me. 

ghstbstr
ghstbstr

I disagree with this review and I usually like Kevin's reviews, but whom am I to judge. I think that this game is a lot of fun and I am 38, and well worth the $173 that spent to get all of the charecters and the starter pack.

rasputin177
rasputin177

As always Kevin lays down an easy to understand and honest review.

I mean you can tell just from watching the videos of people playing the game that the "Play Sets" are just there to add time to the game and get people to fork over money. The team obviously cared more about the "Toy Box" and boy does it show.

Thyasianman
Thyasianman

Wow, I guess there's one thing that you can be impressed with the game. You don't really see too many "Bad Value" Game Emblems. Quite rare they are. 

INF1DEL
INF1DEL

*Game scores below Metacritic average*

Brace yourselves for impending nerd rage!

At least this time it wasn't McShea so there won't be nearly as many ad hominem attacks.

caseysrodeo
caseysrodeo

Really? I'll say this much the game rocks,....its so much better than what gamespot has reviewed. I know everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but hey thats what comments are for...

Activisions skylanders, I {own} both series 1 and 2 is no where in the same park as Disney Infinity. Skylanders is so repetative it isnt funny. At least with Disney Infinity you have different worlds to explore as well as characters that u can honestly relate too.

Stesilaus
Stesilaus

It sounds like another game that was hamstrung by an arbitrarily-chosen delivery date.  My guess is that some manager set a non-negotiable deadline of "two weeks before Labor Day" and forced the developers to cut corners left, right and center to make sure that the deadline was met.


NTM23
NTM23

Whoa. Honestly, with all the good reviews that had been coming from the game (that I saw at least), this surprises me, but OK.

larryboy_dragon
larryboy_dragon

@Infigamer @BlendThree Which would be great... if the toy box let you do that. But instead to get the toy box you read about there you have to spend a great deal on toys, so you can level them up, so you can get spins, so you can play a slot machine, so you can get items to actually play with.

marc5477
marc5477

@Even4life You mean they are finally being more objective while other sites keep writing like they are being paid off by the games they review? Get a clue. 90% of games should be between 3 and 7 but reviewers are scared to rate anything less than 7 because they will lose advertising money and relations with their industry devs. Almost everything reviewed by major sites requires you deduct 2 point before you even begin to really get a accurate measure of the game with exception to 10% of the games.

KiLLaMaNiLLa69
KiLLaMaNiLLa69

@Even4life yeah not s**t this site is getting terrible for reviews i swear they prob play the game for 5 mins and say well gonna give it a 6 when it got a 8.7 on ign and a average socore of 80 or 8 out of 10 they have been giving games s**t review for the past year or so.

larryboy_dragon
larryboy_dragon

I personally enjoy that this was written about the sort of experence you'll be getting with the starter pack.

Too many of the reviews have been written about the whole set - as if most famlies will be blowing $300+. The game you get when spending over $300 and the game you get for $100 are very different games.
Heck, the game you get if you buy all the figures might be worth a 7 or 8, but that's not the game that most people will be playing. Most people will be playing without most of the character unloackables, and with a limited roster that won't even allow them to unlock most of the normal/standard peices to build with.

Infigamer
Infigamer

@APizzo667 I do believe the Toy Story Characters will come with a Play Set, but I do find it kind of wierd that Mickey Mouse is a Toy Box only character.  For Phineas and Perry the Platypus, Wikipedia says they will come in a "Toy Box Set".  I have no idea if that means they come with a bunch of new toys or if that's just a nice way of saying they don't have their own world, whereas Toy Story's Buzz and Jessie are listed under "Play Set".

RAD_TRBO
RAD_TRBO

@Hurvl I honestly felt the same way, not only are kids gonna want the game but they are going to want the toys too. Way to make a simple game and send parents everywhere into bankruptcy. LOL

Infigamer
Infigamer

@BlendThree You have some good points, but Disney's initial idea, for the Toy Box at least, was to let the player do their  own thing.  That way it never gets old.  The way I see it, as soon as a 10-year-old gets bored of the toy box, he won't last 5 minutes playing any other video game, or any game, for that matter.  The important thing to remember is that the potential of the Play Sets is up to Disney, but the potential of the Toy Box is up to the player.

Killermonkey97
Killermonkey97

@alastor529 Kind of a no-brainer right? I guess they're just concentrating on the more popular or up-to-date franchises for now (though unless that sequel is comin out soon, I wouldn't call Incredibles very "modern" anymore). For certain, it's a game that'll be updated through time. I mean, if Square Enix and Warren Spector can put Mickey characters in their games, then surely they're own damn video game company can pull that off.

Infigamer
Infigamer

@ilovetoontown I have to agree that ToonTown is a family game, but it costs $80 for membership, whereas Disney Infinity costs $75.  Just so you realize that.

J4M35ROCK3R
J4M35ROCK3R

@ilovetoontown that and they actually should closed club penguin, it gets money in a almost discriminating and racist way, and is much more boring

J4M35ROCK3R
J4M35ROCK3R

@ilovetoontown actually you seem to be such a Toontown fanboy (just say your username) but you have reason, and actually i think the toontown closing was a strategy for this game sells.

larryboy_dragon
larryboy_dragon

Yes, you think the game is amazing BECAUSE you brought every figure.

Anyone who buys only the core game is going to have much different (worse) experience. They'll be missing many of the interesting toys unlocked by the play sets and that family can't play co-op in the campaigns either... and good luck building anything fun, because less characters means less spins, so they'll also be missing most of the normal/standard pieces too.

This game is terrible value - people with the starter pack are very limited, and if you buy all the peices, it costs hundreds of dollars. I mean, the game you get is fun - but not $300 fun.

So you're partly right... But what you should have said is that it's an adventure only limited by your wallet.

Killermonkey97
Killermonkey97

@caseysrodeo I find his negative points to be spot-on and the score to be just, but I feel for this particular game all of that can be just as easily overlooked. I'm nevertheless excited to play this game with my younger sibling, especially if the ToyBox stuff is as cool as I'm hearing it is. The fact that the money aspect of this whole deal blows regardless of my enthusiasm, but it's kind of inevitable with the SkyLanders-y ambition involved. I'm with ya, pal: this game is amazing, but also despite the stuff that I'd usually complain about in any other video game.

Gee, I just opened the closet to my Disney fanboyism for the first time, AND IT FEELS GREAT

ExtremePhobia
ExtremePhobia

@caseysrodeo I don't know that I'd give it a 9+.  There are quite a few ways of looking at this game. It's not bad for a child to not notice the short comings of the game but if there ARE short comings then it should lose points and I think it does have shortcomings. The fact that it costs $90 at the outset just to play a little co-op is a start (because even then you can only play co-op in one set and toy box) but there are plenty of other problems. The game has a great presentation but the gameplay is only of middling quality so far in the playsets.

Don't get me wrong, there IS value in playing this game with someone else/children but that value is partially derived from the other person. It's not like a good co-op game where the co-op just makes good things great. In this instance, the co-op makes a large portion of the game acceptable. It facilitates the bond... but so does my car by driving to the park.

I think the saddest part is that I want to like it but I don't want to play it. I find it so much more enjoyable to watch.

larryboy_dragon
larryboy_dragon

“People who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves.
To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. ...
When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

― C.S. Lewis

caseysrodeo
caseysrodeo

It's called work for it, and take owership of your toy box...

ConfuseDad
ConfuseDad

@J4M35ROCK3R @ilovetoontown  ok, maybe I'm naive or just not monitoring my kids' online gameplay closely enough, but how exactly does Club Penguin "get money" in a "racist and discriminating way"?  Seriously, I'd like to know what you mean. Thanks.  

Uncle_Servo
Uncle_Servo

@larryboy_dragonBut the same can easily be said of Fallout New Vegas, Skyrim, and every other game out there that offers downloadable content.  They may not cost as much in the long run but the basic principle is the same -- if you want the full game experience you're going to have to pay for it.

Yes, it can get expensive once you've bought EVERYTHING. But there's nothing saying you have to do so at once.  I bought the starter kit (pre-ordered from Best Buy so I got a free figure) and a few other things (mainly 2 figures from each world so my son and I can play co-op in them), but I didn't feel the need to complete the whole set.  I'll probably get to it eventually but I'm not in a hurry.

The way I see it, I can add to my son's collection by giving him figures/playsets for his birthday or at Christmas (or as a reward for good grades, etc.).  Financially speaking it's no different in my opinion than going to the game store every month or so and picking up a new game that you'd play for a while and then just leave it on the shelf because you're bored with it.

Are there bugs?  Sure there are.  Have they ruined the gameplay for me?  Absolutely not.  Many of the issues the reviewer complains about show up in other games that have gotten spectacular ratings (I distinctly remember the 'can't see your character in the cutscenes' issue in Batman Arkham City), but while they're only minor annoyances elsewhere Disney gets slammed for them because it's hip to hate the Mouse with some groups.  Am I saying the reviewer's a Disney hater?  Can't say because I don't know him.  I will say however that I do believe he's unnecessarily emphasizing the game's flaws here.  I wouldn't give it a perfect score or anything, but on the whole I'd give it an 8.

caseysrodeo
caseysrodeo

Well first of all if anpne wants to buy one or all the characters its all about choice isnt it? Another thing make sure you know the definition of "should", thats a pretty big word for someone who is so close minded. No one says you have to buy the all the characters, your imagination is limited by each indivivduals choices and the way they view things.

caseysrodeo
caseysrodeo

Sounds like to me you have a very sad life, I have four children and have a wonderful relationship with each one of them. Not as a whole but as individuals. Please dont blame someones choice over how they feel about life, you make the choice to miserable than by all means your life is what you make it.

Tell me is there a formula for being an adult? If so u can keep it, I'd rather grow up with my children than to be alienated and distant and have an attitude in life that only matters to you.

I'd offer u some milk with your cookies, but u probably dont drink milk or even eat cookies......

J4M35ROCK3R
J4M35ROCK3R

@ConfuseDad @J4M35ROCK3R @ilovetoontown because they give nothing to that who doesn´t pay and like that makes them feel from a low social class, so the kids use the pester power to make their parents buy the so beloved membership, after that they get self-esteem in a negative way making them buy more and more from the franchise, just because they feel higher than that who doesn´t  pay

Disney Infinity More Info

  • Released
    • 3DS
    • PC
    • + 4 more
    • PlayStation 3
    • Wii
    • Wii U
    • Xbox 360
    Disney Infinity will be a new open world sandbox game where players have the freedom and opportunity to create stories and play experiences featuring characters from Walt Disney's and Pixar Animation Studios' most popular franchises.
    7.8
    Average User RatingOut of 62 User Ratings
    Please Sign In to rate Disney Infinity
    Developed by:
    Altron, Avalanche Software
    Published by:
    Bandai Namco Games, Disney Interactive Studios
    Genres:
    Action, 3D, Open-World, Adventure
    Content is generally suitable for ages 10 and up. May contain more cartoon, fantasy or mild violence, mild language and/or minimal suggestive themes.
    Everyone 10+
    All Platforms
    Cartoon Violence