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Review

Dark Souls 2 Review

  • Game release: March 11, 2014
  • Reviewed:
  • X360
  • PC
  • PS3
Aaron Sampson on Google+

"Death is not the worst that can happen to men." - Plato

If you were disappointed by the less-than-exemplary PC port of the original Dark Souls, you'll be glad to know that Dark Souls II for the PC fares far better, featuring graphical settings and resolution options that befit a proper PC game. Otherwise, Dark Souls II for the PC looks similar to its console counterparts, and its mouse and keyboard controls are comfortable and intuitive enough to make the game a good bet for PC players that don't own gamepads. All told, Dark Souls II is every bit the same superb game that appeared on console last month, and deserves respect for its diverse world and nail-biting challenge. - KV, 4/24/2014 15:00 PDT

How much of your humanity are you willing to give up for even the slightest chance of victory?

Dark Souls II asks this question of you at every turn, encouraging you to press onward in spite of imminent death. And with each death, you lose a little of your humanity and become more hollow. Your maximum health slightly diminishes each time as well, eventually sinking to 50 percent of its full value, and yet as each sliver of humanity is sliced away, you heed the call to move onward. Eventually, you overcome the obstacle that stood between you and victory--that quartet of gargoyles swarming you on a rooftop, that arachnoid demon plunging poisonous pincers into your flesh, that disgusting mound of meat that defies description. You have triumphed! But your gain does not come without sacrifice. You have sworn, you have gasped, and you have sweated. You have forfeited your own humanity so you might collect the souls of the damned.

Like Dark Souls and Demon's Souls before it, Dark Souls II is not just a fantasy role-playing adventure, but a cloud that hangs heavy over your head whenever you so much as think about it. These modern classics developed by From Software have rightfully earned a reputation for being brutally difficult, but their beauty is derived not solely from difficulty, but also from dread. Dark Souls II is not a survival horror game in the normal sense, but few games can make you this afraid to peer around the corner, while simultaneously curious as to what awaits you there. Death is so very beautiful in this game, for it comes at the hands of amazing beasts and warmongers: hulking armored knights, shimmering otherworldly invaders, and tendrils that rise out of black pools of poison. Sure, each death punctures your heart, but one of Dark Souls II's many gruesome pleasures is discovering new ways to die.

Embrace the darkness, lest it consume you.

The eerie blackness is front and center as you start up the game and enter the mysterious abode in front of you. Three old crones await you inside and ask you to customize your character and choose a class before venturing into the unknown. Like most of Dark Souls II's characters, these women offer vague advice and refer to events and concepts without filling in the details. The anxiety mounts as you weave in and out of the nearby caverns that fill you in on the basics of movement and combat. This area may teach you the fundamentals, but it also raises a number of questions. What are those odd voices you hear when you stand near the bird's nest that rests on a narrow ledge? What is the significance of the flame sconces scattered about that you are meant to set alight? How do you survive encounters with the monstrous ogres on the beach below that squish you like a measly bug when you draw near?

Welcome to Drangleic, a world that is not quick to whisper its secrets to you, in a game that trusts you to find the answers for yourself.

Welcome to Davy Jones' locker.

This introduction is not as soul crushing as the original Dark Souls' opening, but that's just fine, for Dark Souls II offers you an early taste of hope, a feeling that was quite rare in its predecessors. That hope arrives by way of Majula, a gorgeous oasis that's as close to a home as you will find in the game. My first glimpse of Majula was a revelation. As I emerged from the nearby shadows, the glowing sun blinded me, and I stood in awe of the world opening up before me. Whenever the bleakness of Drangleic at large overwhelmed me, I was glad to return to this hub for an emotional refresh.

Majula is more akin to Demon's Souls' Nexus than to Dark Souls' Firelink Shrine. It is your central hub of operations, and while it's mostly devoid of life when you first come upon it, it slowly fills out with the vendors you meet upon your travels, many of whom set up shop there. Your most important contact there, however, is the cloaked woman who allows you to level up in exchange for souls, the game's currency. But even Majula is not immune to mystery. There's an impossibly deep hole in the ground here, one that spells certain death if you fall into it. (Don't let it fool you; the boards that crisscross this passage may look high enough to provide a safe landing, but you will not survive that fall.) What's down there? Surely something valuable must lurk down there. Or something horrifying. You eventually make your way down, but Dark Souls II doesn't tell you when or how that may happen.

Death is so very beautiful in this game, for it comes at the hands of amazing beasts and warmongers: hulking armored knights, shimmering otherworldly invaders, and tendrils that rise out of black pools of poison.

Instead, Dark Souls II trusts you. As in its predecessors, there are no waypoints, and there is no quest log. Instead, you simply head out into Drangleic seeking to light primal bonfires and thus restore some dignity to this decrepit land. The only way to defeat the defiant creatures that guard the bonfires, however, is to grow stronger by murdering enemies and collecting their souls, which you then spend on new levels, new armor, and other trinkets that strengthen your resolve in battle. If you've played the earlier Souls games, you should take to the combat quickly. You feel each swing of your axe, each stab with your spear, and each fireball you lob. Timing is key: every action leaves you vulnerable, so you must pay close attention to the rhythm of your enemies' attacks and strike at the opportune moment. Managing your stamina is also vital to success. Every attack you launch uses up stamina, as does successfully blocking an attack. You can't simply flail about with abandon; this is not that kind of game, and not taking care during every encounter will get you killed.

Watch your step: that undead soldier is not your biggest threat.

Not that you shouldn't expect death. Dark Souls II is built around your repeated demise. When that inevitable moment comes, you drop all the souls you were carrying and must retrieve them if you don't want to lose them permanently. You get only one chance to get them back, for dying before you reach them eliminates them from the world forever. Of course, this mechanic is nothing new: it's the same concept that powered both Demon's Souls and Dark Souls, after all. But just as Dark Souls represented a structural change over Demon's Souls, so too does Dark Souls II over its predecessor.

Some of the differences are noticeable early on, though their benefits aren't always immediately clear. I was not sure how I felt about one such change: the limited enemy respawns. Each time you die or rest at a bonfire, the world is refreshed and the standard defeated foes respawn. Or at least, that's how it used to happen. In Dark Souls II, there comes a point when many local enemies don't respawn anymore, allowing you freedom to progress with fewer obstacles in your way. It's true that infinite respawns encouraged grinding, particularly when the enemies you faced dropped important items. But that repetition also instilled a bizarre connection between player and game. I can still clearly remember, for instance, exactly how to progress through Dark Souls' Undead Parish--where each enemy is, what attacks it will use, and what precarious drop-offs I must keep a lookout for. When I first encountered the limited respawn system, I worried that the sequel had lost a vital element that would keep Dark Souls II from commandeering my waking and sleeping thoughts.

How much of your humanity are you willing to give up for even the slightest chance of victory?

As it turns out, I shouldn't have worried. The grinding opportunities are still there, and there are in-game items that force enemies in a given region to begin respawning again (and make them more powerful, to boot). Dark Souls II's hook isn't the endless cycle of enemy death and resurrection, however, but the promise of new and exciting places to explore, and new and exciting foes to face. And that hook is supported by any number of subtle changes to the formula. For example, once you activate a bonfire, you can warp to it from any other bonfire without having to pass through perilous places over and over again. Again, I didn't immediately take to this change, but once I discovered just how vast Drangleic was--it's decidedly bigger than Dark Souls' Lordran--I embraced the structural tweaks.

Even playing offline doesn't immunize you against invasion.

These changes might not have worked had Dark Souls II not made discovery such a thrill, but with each new area comes a new wondrous vista and a new challenge to overcome. The early forests and ruins are very Dark Souls, but the intricate architecture and carefully planned enemy locations make even familiar-looking environments fresh and unique. The more progress you make, however, the more unusual the settings become, and the more you need to consider new methods of approach. Suddenly, undead freaks are flinging themselves to the ground and exploding, and so you must hasten your rhythm. You walk through an archway and into the thickest fog imaginable, where you cannot lock on to the ghostly shimmers that attack you. Poison rains from the sky, bedeviled urns curse you when you linger near, and anthropomorphic tortoises stop, drop, and roll all over your puny body. Dark Souls II wants to kill you, but the cycle of death and rebirth is worth it if it means finding the royal ring that lets you open that giant door and discover what new and wonderful lands lie beyond it.

Those lands are incredibly striking. Given reports of Dark Souls II's new engine, I was disappointed by the game's lighting, which was flatter than I had hoped, thus rendering my torch less vital for providing dynamic light than it might have otherwise been. But to fixate for too long on this single visual element sells the fantastic art design short. Make your way past Harvest Valley's poisonous pools--and the fantastic monstrosities that fire orbs of darkness at you--and you can only marvel at all of the windmills that lie before you. Of course, this is Drangleic and not the Netherlands; those windmills are not quaint landmarks, but harbingers of disease and death. Then there's Iron Keep, which takes lava levels to a whole new height of fiery doom. There are very occasional frame rate issues that intrude on the grim elegance, but nothing on par with Dark Souls' Blighttown struggles.

Poison rains from the sky, bedeviled urns curse you when you linger near, and walking tortoises stop, drop, and roll all over your puny body.

And so Dark Souls II is hard--but is it harder than the original? No. I certainly did my share of shouting while playing through Dark Souls II, pitting my bastard sword against Drangleic's powerful protectors, but nothing caused me controller-flinging frustration the way Dark Souls' Ornstein and Smough did. Nor did I ever snarl and growl the way I did when making my way through the original game's Sen's Fortress, let alone facing Demon's Souls' red dragon. But don't overestimate any rumors that Dark Souls II isn't a great challenge. Trudging my way through shin-deep water while avoiding nearby mages' magical homing missiles was not easy. I yelled when I slipped into a drop-off while focused on the mean wizards, and cursed when sea dwellers swiped me from behind while I blocked oncoming attacks. And then, finally, when I reached the foggy door that led to a new area, I was able to breathe--at least until I realized there was a gross boss monster behind that door.

I must give credit to Dark Souls II for making combat feel as fair as it does. The Souls games have always given you the tools to succeed, but while playing the newest entry, I was impressed by how it balanced new challenges with subtle ways to help you succeed. Sometimes, the path to success is relatively obvious, like using a lever to dunk baddies in boiling lava, or luring an armored turtle under a blade and watching the makeshift guillotine slice the half-shelled villain in two. Other possibilities are so subtle as to be obtuse, rewarding thorough investigation with an unexpected boon. Is poison complicating a battle against an evil queen? Is darkness inhibiting your ability to lock on to a pouncing behemoth? There might be some help out there, just hidden from view. Dark Souls II trusts you to find it--or if not, to overcome without it.

Burn, baby, burn.

Just as before, help comes from other players as well as from the game itself. Every Dark Souls II player is intertwined in a comforting web of ambiguous communication. As before, you see the spirits of other players as they journey through their own copies of the grotesque wilderness. You teach them (or mislead them) by forming messages out of predetermined phrases and leaving them on the ground for others to spot. You even teach them with the mere act of dying, leaving a bloodstain that others might touch to witness your ghost reenact the last precious seconds of your life. And if you feel truly cooperative, you can offer your services to other players, who can then summon you in for assistance with a troublesome boss.

Bigger isn't always better.

You can also hinder other players by invading their worlds, just as before, though certain additions to online play keep battles more dynamic than ever. The notification that you have been invaded is still a stomach-churning event, as is the first sight of the red phantom that represents the other player. But your invader is not necessarily invulnerable to the undead soldiers that populate Drangleic--not if you use a particular item designed to make monsters turn on your human enemies. Luring an invader into a trap--look out for the creature with the scythe!--is an absolute delight, though you need to make sure you have your wits about you: the only thing scarier than seeing your evil intruder is not seeing him.

There's so much more to talk about with Dark Souls II. There is the fantastic stretch near the end of the game that fleshes out the story by involving you in grander battles than you would expect from this series. Then there are the covenants--fellowships that bond you with other players and give you more tools to assist or annihilate each other. Joining one covenant allows other players to come to your aid should you be invaded; joining another lets you battle against characters from the original Dark Souls. How some of these covenants may change the very feel of the game is still unclear at this early stage, but having joined the Bell Keeper covenant, I look forward to being summoned to other worlds and preventing others from reaching the tops of their belfries and sounding out the bell that sways there.

Dark Souls II is loaded with secrets and surprises, and even though I have finished the game once, there are so many elements I am still uncovering. I may not have yet unveiled all there is to know about this beastly game, even after 80 hours of play, but I do know this: I will be adventuring through Drangleic for many months to come, sure to be haunted nightly by the disturbing gazes of the faceless titans that tenderize my flesh with their two-ton hammers.

The Good
Fantastic sense of discovery
Lots of tweaks to the Dark Souls formula that make exploration and combat consistently rewarding
Online features make the adventure even more unpredictable
Tons of cool, creepy, challenging bosses
Gives you minimal guidance and trusts you to triumph on your own terms
The Bad
Flat lighting makes some areas look too washed out
9
Superb
About GameSpot's Reviews
Other Platform Reviews for Dark Souls II

About the Author

/ Staff

Kevin VanOrd played over 100 hours of Dark Souls--his favorite game of its console generation--and almost as many of Demon's Souls. He finished Dark Souls II at soul level 131 playing on a PlayStation 3 debug. While his online access was limited during this time, he was able to test various multiplayer features and can't wait to unleash hell on unsuspecting invaders.

Discussion

2239 comments
Aaronp2k
Aaronp2k

I think I preferred the first dark souls. dark souls 2 did everything better but I think the world in dark souls 1 was more interesting. So many unique looking places in dark souls 1, dark souls 2 however didn't have these things. like for example the crystal caves, dukes archives on dark souls 1. I felt this was the only thing missing from dark souls 2, also the bosses were too easy apart from ancient dragon of course which I still haven't beat and yes I have tried hacking away at his feet naked and he just ends up backing me toward the edge where it is impossible to escape his aerial fire breath. Still haven't beat vendrick either, waiting till i beat ancient dragon so I get maximum reduced defense on him. Soon as I beat those 2 I am gonna fight the final boss, not gonna bother with the dark covenant till my second playthrough because having to spend a human effigy every time is ridiculous.

Vienreich
Vienreich

This is the best game I've played by far. The downside however is that since falling into the world of Dark Souls, all other games feel childish and irrelevant. 

kindlewithcare
kindlewithcare

It is a fantastic game that will consume your soul! Go out and buy it. It's only 30 dollars on sale right now.

robinmask
robinmask

I'll get lots of hate but this game is pretty overrated,i started it,there is nothing fun,nothing keeps you to this game.

Diggfinger
Diggfinger

Just finished it…great game, sticks quite close to DS1 in the basic feel and spirit of the game which is both good and bad. Some things have been more streamlined (ex crafting) which I like. Not as good as the first game…for me it is a 8 out of 10….awesome game!! 

begida
begida

Such a stupid pc game no different from first dark souls, even bound by flame was far better rpg than this, its graphic sucks, its gameplay megashucks, what a waste of download, i thought this could be different from the first i thought wrong, i don't get it about these reviews, i install it after 1 hour trying to play this game i just uninstall it, can't even accept to use space in my hard drive

cousinmerl
cousinmerl

Wish they would fix the controls in the next version. Selecting spells is REALLY clunky.
But the challenge is what makes this so likable. (for some)

omnimodis78
omnimodis78

I really don't get this phenomenon!  I got a hold of a copy of the game and it just didn't captivate me.  I consider myself as the type of gamer who isn't too rigid with standards and expectations, but I sincerely don't get why this game is held in such high regard.  The control mechanics just don't seem right (is it hard because of this?), it just doesn't feel polished, but again I think that's all about the controls.  I'm not trying to be burned at the stake here, just genuinely wish someone could tell me what I'm missing here.

Follaboy
Follaboy

I haven't played Dark Souls & Dark Souls 2 yet, which game do you guys recommend I start with?

snessnes
snessnes

with the downgrade graphics and worst frame rate.... if they dont bring this with first gameplay graphics to ps4 ill skip this.. 


its really looks bad.. even ds1 has better graphic and frame rate..

pcostix
pcostix

Don't know why all the hate against DarkSouls2, it's a great game the lore isn't as good as the first one, but is still good nontheless.

The levels are much better IMO and very beautiful

There are more Bosses than in the first game (but they have less lore).

Much more weapons and weapon types.

The combat is much more refined(no more walk circling around enemies for them to miss like retards).


Much longer game than the first one.


It's a very good game, the only flaw(that bothers me too) that I can find in this game is lore being less and a bit confusing instead of misterious like in the first dark souls.

t_u_riptide
t_u_riptide

Debating whether to buy this game.  DS 1(on PS 3; assume it was similar to PC) was so hard yet so addicting.  The best thing about DS 1, that seems to be lacking in video games these days, was the huge penalty for dying.


Playing DS 1, I felt like "the crying kid" with emotional issues from back in the day.  His mom would barge in and hit the power button on the NES just as he reached level 7-4 on Super Mario...now, he had to start again on lv 1-1.  "THAT'S THE FARTHEST I'VE EVER GOTTEN, MOM!!!  I HATE YOU! I HATE YOU!!!"  Awkward for me, the first/last time sleepover guest. 


Dark Souls is crack-cocaine, indeed.  Yeah, I'll probably have to get DS 2...knowing I can quit anytime I want...but I just won't want to...  

poovannaorcbane
poovannaorcbane

bloody good game...PVP and COOP fTW win...pc is the definitive version

Gankstar_VX84
Gankstar_VX84

This game is shit. biggest waste of money  ever.

weareleeds
weareleeds

why, after 300 hours am i still not bored of this game? i should be sick to death by now. the crack cocaine of video games deffo

JC_AEK4ever
JC_AEK4ever

How much money did you get by namco for this review? Quit your job if you want to call yourself a reviewer.

kindlewithcare
kindlewithcare

Just a fantastic experience. A must own. I do have to say that I enjoyed the first one a bit more, but it is great nonetheless. PvP is better in this version, and the game is much more balanced in which it allows for any play style to beat the game. If you are reading these comments, then do yourself a favor and buy the game.

totto210
totto210

really sucks... this game really sucks... DONT BUY,, GAMESPOT REVIEWER IS A LAMER OF NAMCO!

Aaronp2k
Aaronp2k

lol I just beat the ancient dragon boss... I figured out you have to stand next to his feet whereas I was standing behind his feet. was so easy when I figured that out. Now I just need to beat vendrick who also seems very easy but keeps getting lucky hits on me lol. after that I only have final boss left and of course the dark chasms to do but I dunno if I am going to bother with those. should have the game beat by tonight.

diabloakaSAHA
diabloakaSAHA

@begida Youre a casual, a filthy filthy casual. Like rock bottom of the food chain casual. Even below cod nerds. So instead of moaning and embarassing yourself on this thread best course of action is to admit youre a poor casual and suck at games and choose another line of recreation perhaps?? no??  

c0mmanderKeen
c0mmanderKeen

@begida way to go man. you go posting useful stuff like this. love that grammar. thanks for your insights. I especially love that you buy a sequel hoping it would be different from the first. also, I enjoy how you "don't get it about these reviews". Please make a channel I can subscribe to.

tonx93
tonx93

@cousinmerl i know what u mean, there seems to be a delay where u cant change spell  right after you change weapon or vice versa and makes changing spells and weapons mid fight slow

EXxile
EXxile

@omnimodis78 Realistically, I don't even know. All I can tell you is it is captivating in every aspect, and I'm already nearly done with my second play through (and will be starting it up for a third). Maybe you just didn't give it a solid enough chance?


The challenge and the rewards, the online functionality; the amount at stake with each death. It all adds up to make the game such a rewarding experience.

TimotStillHere
TimotStillHere

@omnimodis78 The feeling of completing something. Something hard that i think that would be impossible to be done. I think that's the main reason. Sure i fought another boss in another game but nothing like dark souls. The feeling of afraid losing your souls, traversing white/silver light, only to find another boss waiting to kill you. Guess what? They do kill you. But we come back, die, and come again until we win.

Preserve. I think this is what other game lack nowadays.

EXxile
EXxile

@Follaboy Just be sure to play both. I honestly think the second one is better, but the first one is definitely a good one to start out with as well. Doing so with allow you to see the improvements they made. However, starting with two wouldn't be a mistake either, considering it will still give you some initial insight on how to play.

tonx93
tonx93

@snessnes went back and played dark souls 1 the other day, the graphics are heaps better in two, i didnt think they were but going back and playing the first they are, gameplay also feels tighter, felt alot more in control of my player 

Jrounder82
Jrounder82

@snessnes you are not even close to a gamer if you give a crap about graphics plus this game has fine graphics just wow

diabloakaSAHA
diabloakaSAHA

@pcostix Hate?? I dont see any hate for dark souls 2. Its just that casuals get owned and stuck by lemurs in things betwixt and the revelation that theyre casuals makes their minds explode and act like lunatics on dark souls 2 threads. End of

strrckshn
strrckshn

@pcostix I think nit-picking is a valid part of criticism, especially if the game it's supposed to be succeeding didn't have those relatively minor problems. I enjoyed Dark Souls II a lot, and one of my biggest complaints is that it doesn't succeed elements of the first, it repeats them. It's like going to see a movie sequel and instead of shooting a new action scene, they just play a scene from the last movie with maybe a different filter and some CGI composting.


The overwhelming majority of my complaints stemmed from how they used the lore and nostalgia-baiting writing to attempt to excuse serving up the exact same bosses, items, character archetypes, and various other setpieces we've already seen before in the last two games. Repetition IS fine, but Dark Souls II repeats the first Dark Souls way more than Dark Souls repeated Demon's Souls, which ultimately feels lazy.

In spite of the new project leadership's sincerest and most genuine effort to produce a game worthy of the series' reputation, it seems the absence of Miyazaki's vision and insight have left the final product in a state that falls short of the expectations of a considerable portion of the community. I find it interesting that the majority of the community members who take issue with Dark Souls II are those with extensive experience in the previous games, whereas those new to the series seem to be expressing much more enjoyment of this installment overall. I can't help but wonder if this is the result of their campaign of accessibility... to me, many of the changes in Dark Souls II have a very distinct feel of having been intended to make the game appealing to those unaccustomed to the series. In the meantime I will continue to enjoy Dark Souls II for what it is rather than what it isn't

zeca04
zeca04

@t_u_riptide  Man, im a huge fan of dark souls 1 and demon's souls. Dark souls 2 stinks. You can't even compare it with previous titles. It's bad. Really bad.

Damnation_6
Damnation_6

@Gankstar_VX84 Well that's just like your opinion man.


And you know what really is a waste of money? Ride to Hell: Retribution....some people actually bought that game.

begida
begida

@JC_AEK4ever Man you are so right the most borring games ever dark souls 1&2 for god sake 3 pigs in first 30 min killing me so easy again and again and i am hitting them with my sword and doing nothing to them, waste of playing



EXxile
EXxile

@tonx93 @snessnes Totally agreed. I went back and started playing the first one again after completing two, and not sure what you're talking about, snessnes. The graphics are significantly better in two (especially the lighting and fire effects), and the game runs a lot smoother than the first one. Controls also feels less clunky IMO.

pcostix
pcostix

@strrckshn @pcostix Well that's my biggest complaint about game sequels nowdays. I don't like that sequels stray too far away from their predecessors.

If I like a game and I'm looking for a sequel, I expect to be more content of the same formula and that it remains true to  himself.


For exemple loved Farcry but after playing Farcry2, still wanted a true sequel to the first one  because that was a completly diferent game. (same thing for Crisis, Dragon Age Origins, etc...)


So if people don't want more Darksouls, if people want something new, then please tell FromSoft to make a new game with similar mechanics but totaly different story and a new name.


Sequels IMO should exactly what Darksouls 2 is (lore flaws aside), a game that gives you more content of the one you liked.

EXxile
EXxile

@zeca04 @t_u_riptide I find that very odd, considering I'm a huge fan of both Demon's Souls and Dark Souls as well but I LOVE Dark Souls 2. Maybe it's just a matter of preference, but I think the tweaks they made were an improvement. I just don't see how you can even say it's bad, but like I said, maybe it's just a matter of preference.

Lykanthropie
Lykanthropie

@zeca04 @t_u_riptide I can only say the same thing - played the souls games for mounths and a lot of times - but stopped with Dark Souls after 2-3 weeks, singleplayer is ok - but when you come to multiplayer its all over ... testing weapons and getting stuff is also very stupid.

Unblanced game with nothing that makes it good but its name.

JC_AEK4ever
JC_AEK4ever

@begida Those pigs were so annoying.... but the most annoying thing of all is that you keep getting button tips for an xbox controller. I want to use my keyboard and mouse when I play on the PC and I couldn't even find the jump button. This game is the worst PC port I have ever played. It's even worse than GTA4. It's definitely not worth a 9... maybe not even a 1.

begida
begida

@JC_AEK4ever @begida imagine that gta4 i had played about 1 hour and then uninstall it such a crappy game but this games is even worst even whicher 1 with its crappy control system was better than this

diabloakaSAHA
diabloakaSAHA

@begida @JC_AEK4ever Quiet causal. Know your place at the bottom of the food chain and stop throwing a hissy fit. You just suck at games , thats all there is to it.

Dark Souls II More Info

  • Released
    • PC
    • PlayStation 3
    • Xbox 360
    Dark Souls II is a sequel to From Software's critically acclaimed title Dark Souls. The game with feature a new hero, a fresh storyline, and an "unfamiliar" setting.
    8
    Average User RatingOut of 837 User Ratings
    Please Sign In to rate Dark Souls II
    Developed by:
    From Software, Namco Bandai Games
    Published by:
    Namco Bandai Games, Bandai Namco Games, From Software
    Genres:
    Action, Role-Playing
    Content is generally suitable for ages 13 and up. May contain violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling and/or infrequent use of strong language.
    Teen
    All Platforms
    Blood and Gore, Mild Language, Partial Nudity, Violence