Anvil of Dawn Review

This title walks the line between the combat and puzzles genres very delicately, and most adventurers will find the game maintains an enjoyable balance throughout.

by

It's been a long time since the release of Westwood's Lands of Lore, but most gamers will recognize its obvious influence on the design of Anvil of Dawn, New World Computing's beginner-level RPG. Even so, originality isn't everything, and the company has done a commendable job of combining solid graphics and animation with the successful play style of Westwood's classic.

Players start the game by choosing one of five characters, each with their own special gifts in qualities including strength, agility, and magic use. Once their identity is sorted out, players will use the game's pleasingly simple first person, turn-based interface to move through Tempest, a war torn world that (as usual) requires a hero (or heroine—and I commend New World for their inclusion of two female player characters) to sort things out. As the game progresses, characters will face dozens of enemies, all of them unique, not the typical Tolkienesque denizens of most RPGs. Weapons range from commonplace items such as spears, bows, axes and swords to magical armament that enables players to stand up against some of the game's more powerful opponents. Twenty-five spells are also available in seven different disciplines (Earth, Wind, Fire, Water, Lightning, Flesh, and Void) for characters wily enough to learn them. This title walks the line between the combat and puzzles genres very delicately, and most adventurers will find the game maintains an enjoyable balance throughout.

There's no doubt that Anvil of Dawn reformulates something that's been done before, but in the end, it's a pretty good rehash. The game's entertaining storyline, easy-to-understand statistics, and functional game balance earn it a place on any beginning RPG fan's shelf. On the flip side, those who are looking for an RPG with depth of play and characters that can be highly personalized will probably walk away from this title disappointed.

The Good
N/A
The Bad
6.5
Fair
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3 comments
Captain_Cozmic
Captain_Cozmic

These games were the kind that kept you going for hours as you battled the forces of evil that stood in your way or attacked you as you explored the area.  One had to learn their weaknesses and what battle strategy worked the best while always mindful of your health and mana.  And there was always finding treasure, health and mana, and items to give you more of an edge.  This has some interesting additions in the area of spells, some of which are a pleasure to have in your arsenal.  It was one I found at Gog and bought after reading about the features and storyline and it is a purchase that is well worth it if you like the old school RPGs that were "grid" based, something that was great for mapping(which the game has as it maps where you've been and where there are items of interest.)  This is a game that qualifies as one to experience for the fun it has built into many aspects.

ChiefFreeman
ChiefFreeman

Sh1tty review by Trent Ward. Way too short.

Anvil of Dawn

  • PC
This title walks the line between the combat and puzzles genres very delicately, and most adventurers will find the game maintains an enjoyable balance throughout.
Check out even more info at the Anvil of Dawn Wiki on Giantbomb.com