Ad problems

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How is everybody? This next segment will be fairly brief, compared to my last entry. Today's topic: In-Game Advertisements. Please message me with any responses.

Advertisement has always been a sort of necessary evil; companies need to get the word out about their products, and the media needs money to entertain us. But now even our once-sacred video games are now being used as fifty dollar billboards. Perhaps that's a bit of a stretch, but I think everyone who has played certain (I say "certain" because a: I don't want to racing game fans to whine at me and b: I can't recall the name of the racing game I'm reffering to) racing games, would know what I am talking about. Now, I understand perfectly that ads are justified when in the appropriate setting, like a Nascar, being a part of that atmosophere, but when I can't play a street-racing game without passing by the same Sprite or Mountain Dew billboard over and over again, I think I have right to be concerned. I don't want to see the next Grand Theft Auto character with a Banana Republic T-shirt and Dockers pants. Acually, I don't really play many racing games that don't involve running people over or blowing things up, but I am still concerned that some video game companies will basically "sell out", and become like the MTVs of the gaming world.

Movies are beginning to catch the trend as well. In the mind-dump known as I-Robot, Will Smith blatantly advertised over five name brand products within the first fifteen minutes, such as Dos Equis beer, Converse shoes, and JVC (which is either a stock company or an electronics company, I can't remember)

For more on that desecration to Isaac Asimov (the guy who wrote the book the movie was supposed to be based on), visit www.maddox.xmission.com or www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net
(warning, this site is run by a very opinionated and some consider offensive man. I personally love his site and even have it as my homepage)

Back to ads again, I'm just concerned that the industry is heading down a dark path, and I don't mean in a good way.

Any replies would be very much appreciated.


May your racing games be devoid of annoying ads
-MindAsylum


Myself and my thoughts

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I am MindAsylum. I live in North Carolina, and am an aspiring writer/mortician. My favorite artists are Marilyn Manson, Evanescence, Slipknot, and KoRn (sorry, I don't know how to turn the "R" backwards). I am a person who values individuality above anything in everything, including games. I like to think of myself as an intellectual by nature, examining evidence to see through the collective veils of over-conformity and mindless rebellion. This often shows in my writing as well as my taste in games. Here are my thoughts on gaming.


Gaming is a much-misunderstood art form, and for me is more than just a form of entertainment. For an example, the show "Cops" is entertaining to me, but that doesn't make the show a work of art. In gaming, elements have to work together to make for a truly enjoyable experience. Such elements as graphics and sound are important, but serve merely as enhancers. The graphics make little difference in a game that is poorly designed, unoriginal, and/or tired. However, if the mechanics of the game are logical and user-friendly, the technical problems sorted out (such as bad anti-aliasing or collision-detection), and the overall flow of the game are efficient and original, then the graphics, the sound, and plot (if applicable) of the game can truly uplift the experience.


Those who antagonize video games as "violent" or "lewd" or "a bad influence on youth" seem to have forgotten that gaming doesn't put anything in a person's head that wasn't there already. The same is true of violence or lewdness on TV, music or movies. All of these things are apart of human nature, whether we want to realize it or not, and must be dealt with at some point. If someone shoots someone because they saw it on a video game, then it leads one to wonder how long it would have been before that person would have done an atrocity on his/her fellow humans without the "influence" of video games. For an example, if you have read the article "Death by Playstation 2?" you would probably know that video games are a common scapegoat for youth violence. Nevermind that hitler never played violent games. Nevermind that Mengler didn't own a Nintendo when he committed his murders. The sole purpose of this allegation is to allow parents to abdicate their responsibility for their children, to force a sort of skewed, self righteous sense of morality upon this and future generations. I'm sure Jerry Falwell wasn't very pleased when the allegation of a fairly recent court case was thrown out. For those of you who did not read the adforementioned article, the case essentially boiled down to this: parents of a teen-aged boy attempted to sue Rockstar Games for the violent content included in the stealth-action game, Manhunt, on the grounds that it influenced their child to murder one of his friends over a drug deal. Luckily, the case was thrown out of court not long after, and the opposing lawyer expressed his true feelings for the game industry when he said: "anyone who would spend all day playing Grand Theft Auto is daft."
Politics aside, I hope that gaming will continue to flourish in spite of these hitches, and continue to be a respectable and dedicated art form.


Well that was lengthy, but I hope It was worth the read. I will continue to write in this journal about whatever is on my mind. Questions? Comments? Email me at MindAsylum@gmail.om

 Just a fair warning: don't send me any viruses, as I have some very computer-literate friends.
May your journey to gaming nirvana be filled with adventure (or something cheesy like that)
-MindAsylum