LoG-Sacrament's forum posts

#1 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

it was normally fun, but i would always get it right in the morning and i hated sweating then having to go to other classes. because of that, i ended up doing easy stuff like walking, ping pong, and kickball.

#2 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

i'm not really hot on the idea for gaming. the selling point is always immersion, but i have no problem being immersed in games right now. i never played metroid prime, dark souls, or limbo and thought "oh, man. i would be so much more immersed if i was using VR." i was already in those worlds. immersion is about game design more than it is about hardware.

#3 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

howard the duck :P

i certainly haven't seen all the marvel adaptations, but i probably like spiderman 2 the most from what i've seen. i think it's good source material to begin with. like people always talk about how batman is just a regular guy because he has no "super" powers, but really he's a brooding billionaire with restraint that should be a super power. peter parker is truly a regular guy and the raimi movies get at that. i'd pick the 2nd one as the best in the trilogy because parker is most relatable trying to lead the balanced life we all try for (his just involves shooting webs).

doc oc is probably the best villain of the bunch too. it feels like so many superhero movies all inevitably end with the good guy in a once-and-for-all battle with the bad guy (who is usually a mirror image of the superhero's powers). not only is doc oc's lumbering strength a good foil to spiderman's agility, but spiderman 2 doesn't really have that final showdown. doc oc starts as a human being and ends as one by redeeming himself rather than by getting beat up by spiderman. the whole arc is what makes that classic monster movie reference in the middle more than just a neat moment.

#4 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

@TheDbl7 said:

@LoG-Sacrament: They retread over a few aspects but these movies are following the story line of The Amazing Spiderman comic books unlike the ones Toby Maguire starred in

i guess my disinterest isn't really in the specifics of the story line. like the parts i enjoy about the spiderman movies aren't "will parker defeat the green goblin?" or "is he going to fight doc oc this time?" they're more character issues like "can peter find a balance between his responsibilities and his personal needs?" and "how will peter handle success?"

i think the same sort of thing applies to the contrast between the burton and nolan batman movies. like batman didn't kill anybody in burton's films because he's a hero in a campy movie so why would he? part of the reason nolan's movies justify their existence is that they make the case that batman chooses killing as the moral line he won't cross in order to separate himself from the villains. there's a big difference in how the 2 series depict the character.

#5 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

i like the sam raimi movies overall (the 3rd certainly had its problems), but i haven't even seen any of the andrew garfield spiderman movies yet. they just seem like they'd be retreading old ground. i mean, i enjoyed the tim burton batman movies and then the christopher nolan interpretation, but those were a long time apart and had very different angles on the characters.

#6 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

@LoG-Sacrament said:

@TheFlush said:
@Motokid6 said:

So much Sansa hate.. i like her. Shes been held hostage the entire show. She'll get her moment in the sun.

Yeah, I actually like her character quite a bit. When she was first introduced she was a shallow girl who thought her beauty would get her anywhere. Because of that naivety it only got her into trouble. And now that she realised the situation she's in, because of her own idiocy, she has to toughen up and change her attitude to get out of this mess. I think that unless she's suddenly killed, she might do something radical. After all, she's still a Stark.

that's certainly a valid interpretation of sansa, but i never read her as expecting anything for her beauty. i've always interpreted her more as someone who just had everything so good that she never really expected so much sh*t to happen. i mean, she is beautiful (and, more to the point, rich, the eldest daughter in a revered family, and beautiful) so everybody treated her well growing up. yeah, she is a girl in a patriarchal society, but she's not arya stark or brienne of tarth. all she really wanted to do was sew and eventually get married and nobody was going to stop her from doing those sorts of things. i think she had everything so good for all her life that she just thought "oh, well that's how things are."

I have always felt so bad for Sansa. In the beginning of the series she was so young and naive and truly believed that she was doing the right thing, being the true "Lady" she was raised to be, by being loyal to Joffrey. All the things she did that people hate her for (lying about Arya and the bakers boy, trying to get Ned to say he committed treason, acting so arrogant, etc.) were just her doing what she thought was the right thing according to the expectations of everyone around her. Then suddenly her whole world is torn inside out, she learns the hard way that honor, loyalty, expectations, etc. mean pretty much nothing. Now she has lost her family, dignity, and has suffered through so much shit. How anyone can still hate her baffles me.

definitely. there are very few characters that stick around for a good chunk of the story that i find myself really hating. joffrey and gregor clegane come to mind, but it's not a very long list after those 2. even cersei and tywin lannister at least have their reasons even if they don't necessarily redeem them. i pity sansa more than anything.

#7 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

@TheFlush said:
@Motokid6 said:

So much Sansa hate.. i like her. Shes been held hostage the entire show. She'll get her moment in the sun.

Yeah, I actually like her character quite a bit. When she was first introduced she was a shallow girl who thought her beauty would get her anywhere. Because of that naivety it only got her into trouble. And now that she realised the situation she's in, because of her own idiocy, she has to toughen up and change her attitude to get out of this mess. I think that unless she's suddenly killed, she might do something radical. After all, she's still a Stark.

that's certainly a valid interpretation of sansa, but i never read her as expecting anything for her beauty. i've always interpreted her more as someone who just had everything so good that she never really expected so much sh*t to happen. i mean, she is beautiful (and, more to the point, rich, the eldest daughter in a revered family, and beautiful) so everybody treated her well growing up. yeah, she is a girl in a patriarchal society, but she's not arya stark or brienne of tarth. all she really wanted to do was sew and eventually get married and nobody was going to stop her from doing those sorts of things. i think she had everything so good for all her life that she just thought "oh, well that's how things are."

#8 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

well, i'd be terrified if i thought i was about to die because, you know, i like living. however, i know that it's very unlikely to happen any time soon so i'm never scared of it.

like i'd be terrified if i were just walking down the street and a tiger jumped out in front of me. i'm just not constantly terrified at the prospect of tigers because i know that's very unlikely to happen.

#9 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

Xbox live is a bastion of maturity.

#10 Posted by LoG-Sacrament (20286 posts) -

@IndianaPwns39: yeah, DSI did the whole sense of place thing really well. DSII had some fluid transitions too (like the whole sequence of levels inside the well flowed into one another properly), but i like in DSI how you can almost always see landmarks from other areas on the horizon.

plus i think finding a shortcut is more satisfying than finding a warp point.