DraugenCP's forum posts

#1 Edited by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

@DraugenCP said:

A Japanese game whose protagonist is a high-school student who lost his mother at a young age? Crikey, how original.

Either way, Cryostasis is the correct answer.

There is much more than that to the story.

But if I tell you why it would ruin a lot of major piece of the plot so I will refrain from doing so.

I have played Cryostasis and while it has great atmosphere it's plot is no where near the quality of YU-NO and that is understandable given the type of game Cryostasis is.

The brilliance of Cryostasis is not only in its plot, but in the way in which it is integrated into the gameplay. That's what it is about: being able to capitalise in full on the strengths of the medium. It's not difficult to tell a great story in a video game when you bereave it of most of the elements that make it a video game in the first place.

#2 Edited by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

A Japanese game whose protagonist is a high-school student who lost his mother at a young age? Crikey, how original.

Either way, Cryostasis is the correct answer.

#3 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

I prefer a well-written review and I don't really care what the rating scale is. I wouldn't have a problem with reviews not having scores at all.

#4 Edited by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

You hipster tweens are hilarious. The point of a review is to gauge a game's quality for the masses to know if it's worth purchasing/playing.

That may have been the case 10 years ago, but not anymore. These days, there are so many other, better methods of discovering whether or not a game is worth it: demos, entire YouTube playthroughs, free weekends, and sometimes even FTP versions of games. The idea of a review being nothing more than a 'buyer's guide' is terribly outdated. I don't know anyone who bases their game purchases based on the actual content of a review (at best they'll take a gander at the Metacritic average).

That being said, the recent trend of reviewers attempting 'critique' with undigested ideas regarding a game's personal and societal implications is cringe-worthy. It's not so much the idea that I resent, though, as it is its poor execution. Petit's GTA V review is an 'excellent' example of how not to tackle such topics in a video game review.

#5 Edited by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

A good bit of Arma 3. Made a stealth mission that somehow ended up in a cat-and-mouse game. My giant sniper rifle gave me the edge, though. :)

#6 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

Europa Universalis.

I recommend it to everyone.

Yes, EU is a near-endless source of fun once you get the hang of it.

#7 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

Yay, I finally made a contribution again.

#8 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

Depends. I'm decent at football (soccer for yanks) games and more realistic shooters, but I'm subpar at the run & gun stuff. Racing games, though, I seem to be amazing at.

#9 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

An overly affectionate and preoccupied female character whose function consists of boosting the male player's ego. So no.

#10 Posted by DraugenCP (8430 posts) -

No, sandbox games that are based around the 'lawl u get to blow stuff up' premise seldom are.