DESTINY MEGA-HYPE THREAD

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#1 Edited by which_wich (175 posts) -

(Mods, make and exception!) Not 500 posts ready, but come on...

AWWWW SSHHIIITTT!!!! GET HYPED!!!
If you see Jack Black in this thread just tell him to f**k off!

ARTS.MIC: Let's get the boring loathsome generalities out of the way; Destiny is a post apocalyptic action-adventure first-person shooter that is part one of a 10 year publishing deal between Bungie and Activision. Scheduled for a 2014 release and slated to be launched on both the upcoming Playstation 4 and Xbox One as well as the Playstation 3 and Xbox 360, this collaboration between the creators of Halo and Call of Duty garners ambivalence at first glance. These days the North American gaming market is beyond flush with first person shooters, one of the bigger reasons that I abandoned console gaming. In addition this game requires an online connection to play, which is fine if you're making an massively-multiplayer online (MMO) game. Bungie and Activision however have made it clear that Destiny will be not be an MMO, and the online requirement's main purpose isn't as a digital rights management (DRM) measurement. Here, gamers and laymen, is where Destiny gets interesting and provides us a glimpse at one of the many possibilities of the future of gaming. The most surprising part of it is that my fascination with the game has nothing to do with the storyline.

The first thing about Destiny that is worthy of interest is that the world will be “alive,” which is to say that events will happen in-game that aren't necessarily controlled or planned by the developer. Just as an idea alone this is something that should make any gamer drool since few things in gaming are ever truly random or beyond the developer's planning. Rather than a static world where even random events are anticipated, the world of Destiny will be a dynamic one much like our own. While not many details have been given so far of what kind of events will be uncontrolled this is certainly an aspect of the game that I'm looking forward to seeing elsewhere in the gaming world (Attention Activision: the Blizzard branch of your company could put this to good use).

Many generations ago (shortly after present day), the emergence of a gargantuan construct known only as "the Traveler" ignited a Golden Age of technology and exploration for humanity. Initially the Traveler settled on Mars, where it shared its knowledge and technology with humanity, and a city grew around it. With the assistance of the Traveler and its enigmatic technology, humanity tripled its lifespan, terraformed planets and moons, and expanded its civilization beyond Earth and throughout much of the solar system.

The Golden Age would last for centuries, but human civilization fell victim to a cataclysm of extraordinary magnitude, known as the Collapse. A malicious entity known as The Darkness, an ancient enemy of the Traveler, waged a campaign of destruction against civilization. Few managed to survive the devastation. Forced to withdraw to Earth, mankind's homeworld, the embattled sphere made its final stand, where it sacrificed itself to save the remnants of humanity. The Traveler is now silent and dormant, while those who survived united to build The City beneath it, establishing the last bastion of civilization in the solar system. A powerful defensive aura remains projected over the City by the Traveler.

The City has come under attack throughout the years, mysterious alien species probing its defenses for weaknesses. You are one of an army of warriors known as Guardians that call the City home, individuals that have taken a stand to reclaim what has been taken from us. Guardians have harnessed the Traveler's energy to create powerful abilities that allow them powerful offensive attacks, defensive counters, and increased mobility. Guardians seek to uncover the mysteries of humanity's downfall and reclaim what has been taken from them. These exploits lead them to rediscover and reclaim old worlds, once part of mankind's civilization but now occupied by deadly extraterrestrial species and threatened by the return of the Darkness.

The Guardians are all that stand between the dark forces that seek to destroy civilization and those who take refuge within the City. It is their duty to rebuild from the ashes of defeat, to ignite the once great flame of human civilization, and be the light that shines through the darkness. Their failure would mean the destruction of the human race.

It's worth noting that the agency-provided images do appear to be mock-ups for advertising purposes and are likely based on previously existing imagery. Eagle-eyed readers have pointed out that the second image appears to be based on artwork from canceled Command & Conquer game Tiberium.

The name Destiny first emerged in May when court documents revealed details on four games in the series. At the time, installments in the Destiny series were revealed to be coming in fall 2013, fall 2015, fall 2017 and fall 2019. In 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020, downloadable expansions known as “Comet” were also said to be planned.

The contract suggested the first Destiny game would be available first on Xbox 360 as well as “the next successor console platform released by Microsoft,” which the contract referred to as Xbox 720. Releases on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 and PC were said to be planned in the years following, though today's information suggests a more closely timed release could be a possibility.

There’s a difference between story and world building, right?

Yeah, you’re absolutely right. Our approach very much at the beginning was world building, to make sure we had a world that we could build in.

This game actually started as a fantasy game. But from the very beginning, the candle in the darkness was literally a city with white walls and red roofs and views of sunlight, up on a green hill. It looked amazing. And then it evolved, as we evolved into sci-fi, because we felt the pure fantasy was missing all these things we loved. Literally, explosions. It’s kind of a joke, but it’s not really a joke. Explosions are awesome, just as a gameplay device and all kinds of other things. People understand them, they’re a really easy metaphor for projecting power into the world. Anyway, we started with this fantasy city that was beautiful and it evolved through spaceships and space stations into cities, eventually to the traveler that you see today. That was quite a journey. But the core was all the same, which is that the candle in the darkness.

Before it all began, everyone had the right to Dance...

Were you looking to MMO storytelling styles as opposed to what you see in shooter stories? Were you moving away from a straight, linear thing?

Yes. The game we want to make and we want to play is a shooter. Making a great shooter is not the thing I’m worried about now when I look out at the game, where it’s my job to be worried about whatever isn’t the farthest along. When we set out to build that shooter from the beginning, we really were aware that there’s a bunch of innovation, a bunch of cool stuff happening in other genres, certainly in MMOs. We wanted to learn from that. One of the things that was really important, just by building a story was that we wanted a world and not just a story. We wanted a world that we can tell a lot of stories in. I think there’s a way that you can learn that lesson from some MMOs. But they have a world that’s just fun to explore and to think about, look forward to the next story. I would say the best, certainly the MMOs genre is about story but also about player progression as well. Just really fascinating, fun things that those games do. I would say having said that, at heart this game’s got to be a shooter. I believe that’s what people, and I don’t have any control in this, will label it and that people who come and look at this experience are going to like it because it’s a shooter, and it’s my hope, going to be surprised by the depth that they haven’t seen before like the single progression across all activities and that they’re going to stick with and enjoy it and stay with it because of that.

A lot of people have wondered whether this is an MMO or not. Obviously, based on what you were just saying, you see this more as a shooter. Are there other things that you would point to that set it apart from MMOs?

It’s kind of an apple and oranges thing, so I don’t want to draw too many comparisons, but I think that at its heart, what people are going to enjoy and engage with the game in Destiny is the action game. It’s ultimately this fantasy of being the super powerful change agent in the world, in a very analog, dexterity, skill-based way.

I think the MMOs have different fantasies. There are some action-y, shooter-y games in that space. But I think after 30 seconds or a minute playing them, the gamer came to have an action experience, they’re going to be disappointed. We want to be the opposite. People that sit down and pick up the controller in Destiny, the first 60 seconds, we want them to be hungry to see their first bad guy, to have that first interaction. The experience that’s most important to remember, that we are trying to create anyway, is that when players have that first hands-on interaction with the controller, they’re going to feel like they’re in a great shooter and that any of the story or progression lessons that we’ve learned from MMOs that we’ve brought from that space or from social games, that those are going to add on to that experience instead of coming first. I can talk about hotbars and red dots and stuff like that. I think those are just all aspects of that top-level action versus social progression game. We’re building one of those. I won’t be disappointed if nobody calls us an MMO.

You mentioned an interesting metaphor – the origin coming out of the idea of a Camelot, and the knights going out on their quest. What is your grail quest here? You’ve got these guardians, what are they doing?

I was actually not going to talk about this, but I can do a little bit. Let me give you the short windup to the story. The thing is going to be in the first 60 seconds of the game. A few years from today, our present, this alien intelligence, the Traveler, comes to Earth, and we don’t know a lot, we don’t remember a lot about this time, but we know a few things that are to survive. We don’t know if the Traveler was a ship, or a god, or a moon, or whatever, but we know this thing came and we know that it settled on Mars and that it began to share its amazing technology with us, and a city grew up around it, and all this. And it started what we now call The Golden Age, and humanity spread throughout the solar system, human lifespan tripled, we terraformed planets – it was amazing. It was the best times humanity had ever seen. But the traveler had enemies – one enemy in particular. And when that enemy caught up with it at Earth, an enemy that’d been chasing it for millennia across the galaxy, a horrible battle happened. We remember almost nothing about this, this is in the distant past of the game. That’s what we call The Collapse. So that’s the solar system we inherit, is one where humanity had spread to all worlds, all the moons, all the asteroid belts, had built great things, and then had to abandon them– being driven out of them and been killed. And humanity shrunk back after this battle against the ancient enemy of the Traveler, where the Traveler itself was crippled and fell silent above Earth. Humanity was driven back to this one spot underneath the Traveler – the one safe spot in the solar system – and built the city. That’s where the guardians come from, and the guardians’ grail quest is to drive back the Darkness and wake the Traveler. And then in fact, it just got worse than that because this ancient enemy of the Traveler – the Darkness – is returning, and so there’s even more urgency. And another battle is going to be fought, and the Traveler is crippled and silent. Without it, we’ll be defenseless.

Bo Burnham: "I woke up this morning and I sat on a log, I opened up the menu and the menu said frog!"

You talk about the Traveler being crippled, but it’s presumably still providing some protection Is it just enough to keep the city safe?

That’s correct. Protect the city through the worst times right after the collapse – but even that – the reason that the city exists and it’s still safe is because of that very short range aura around the silent Traveler.

So, it’s not just humanity in this city, is that right? There’s some other ally species? I’m not sure what you call them. Is that a fair way to talk about them, or are they part of humanity at this point? And who are they?

I’m excited for players to slowly learn and talk about that over time. But yeah, it’s not just people, it’s the things that people have become, and it’s the things that people have built, and it’s other things. Everything’s all together. I’d like to hold some of that back, because I think some of that is going to be the the deep history of the world – and where these allies came from, even where the city came from, why it’s there. It’s going to be a fun thing for people to discover.

GAMEINFORMER Article: DESTINY STORY STALLS OUT OF THE GATE (OPINION)

After years of trying to understand and track Halo's expansive, confusing lore, I was looking forward to the clean narrative slate that Destiny would provide. This was my chance to lay a bedrock foundation of understanding for Bungie's next big sci-fi opus. When I sat down to play the beta, I pricked up my ears and was ready to take it all in. Within an hour, I was hopelessly lost again. After talking to some of my fellow editors about what's going on in Destiny's story, I've come to the conclusion that it's not me – it's Bungie. Here are some of the stumbling blocks standing between Bungie's approach to storytelling and the player. READ ON....

Only going to ask you this once...Where is the tanning Salon?

Creating an epic adventure story begins and ends with the proper hero, and unsurprisingly, Bungie is doing their best to give players the tools to make any hero they see fit. From race to clothing, tattoos and hairstyles, customization is the key. The studio detailed their starting character classes at GDC 2013, a first sign of how science-fiction and fantasy will be blended in Destiny‘s universe. Players will first have the chance to choose their playable race: Human, as one of the remnants of humanity surviving under the shadow of the massive ‘Traveler’; Awoken, a mystical, ethereal take on humanity that Staten refers to as a type of “space elf”; and finally, one of the Exo, a savage, vicious fighter that lives for battle (with shades of Master Chief and the Terminator).

Once race is chosen, one of the three character classes of Titan, Hunter or Warlock must also be decided upon. Calling on tropes of the ‘space marine,’ gunslinger and wizard, respectively, each represents a very different approach to both gameplay and art design. A fact made exceedingly clear by the variety of armor plating, cloth, and weaponry visible in the latest concept artwork.

The emphasis and ambition in customization and player choice is surprising, as the studio’s previous hero, Halo‘s Master Chief was a straightforward space marine limiting player control to weaponry and combat strategy; also providing a baseline from which all players had to specialize. In singleplayer that meant an easier task of balancing difficulty, and in multiplayer, removed perks and over-powered veterans.The Guardians are the player characters of Destiny. They are a standing army of specialized soldiers tasked with the defense of the last city on Earth. They are also responsible for exploring the remnants of human society abandoned throughout the solar system and investigating the remains of their Golden Age of exploration. Guardians wage a vicious armed conflict against a myriad of extraterrestrial species who pose an immediate threat to the survival of humanity. The greatest source of the Guardian's power lies in their ability to harness the energy of The Traveler and use it as a weapon against their opponents.

There are three primary Races in Destiny, and upon creating your character, you will be able to choose which one to play as.

AWOKEN

Awoken resemble baseline humans, with the notable exception of having pale blue or gray skin. They also have luminescent eyes with glowing irises. Joe Staten and Christopher Barrett described the Awoken as being beautiful, exotic, and mysterious. They mentioned the team looked at elves, vampires, ghosts, and angels to "capture that exotic, sort of ethereal feel". They have been described as being of "otherworldly origins."

Arach Jalaal is an Awoken and the representative of Dead Orbit. He sells a variety of Dead Orbit-branded armor, weapons, and emblems intended for use in the Crucible.

It is said the Awoken were born in the Collapse, descended from those who tried to flee its wrath. Something happened to them out on the edge of the deep Black, and they were forever changed. Today many Awoken live in the Reef, aloof and mysterious, but others returned to Earth, where their descendants now fight for the City. Earthborn awoken sometimes venture out to the Reef, hoping to learn its secrets - but find no special welcome from the reclusive queen.

The Crow is an Awoken. The Crow does not appear to be affiliated with the City and expresses resentment toward it and the Guardians for, as he put it, "breathing down (his) neck".

The Awoken were spawned during the assault on the Traveler by The Darkness. After The Darkness launched its massive attack, humanity surged away from the destruction and desolation. Some were saved, able to escape the tide of death, while others were destroyed in mere seconds; still others were able to escape The Darkness, but only just. Those who were able to escape but were still affected by The Darkness became the Awoken. Their skin turned pale and their irises bleached white by the pure darkness of nothingness, some of the Awoken migrated towards Earth after the Collapse, leaving their brethren at the edge of the ruins of war.

Commander Zavala is an Awoken and the Vanguard for the Titan class, located within the Tower. For his class, Commander Zavala sells Titan armor and emblems, and Vanguard armor, which can be given to all Guardians regardless of their class

Upon appearing on Earth, they quickly joined the Humans and the Exo in building the City and the Tower, ascending to the role of Guardian.

Players choose to play as one of several different player classes. Though each player class in Destiny has a distinct appearance, dress, and skill set, player classes are designed to be balanced, with no class intended to be clearly better overall than any other. A player may choose to be any class, regardless of species, but each class can only access certain armor, subclasses, and abilities. Weapons are not class-restricted; any class can use any weapon.

HUMANS

Humans are the first (and presumably most common) sapient species on Earth. Bungie has described the human species in Destiny as "relatable, tough, and uncomplicated." In terms of player design, Bungie drew its inspiration for humans from military, sports stars, and action movie heroes.

Amanda Holliday is a non-player character located within the Tower. Holliday is a Human, but does not wear armor associated with any particular Guardian Class. She sells spaceships and vehicles to players.

Humanity evolved on Earth over the course of millions of years, technologically developing into a space-faring populace. Upon a mission to Mars, humanity discovered the mysterious Traveler, a monolithic globe of intense power. Under the guidance of the Traveler, humanity entered a Golden Age; their lifespans were tripled, their technology grew by leaps and bounds, and the once Earth-bound race expanded into the stars, establishing colonies within the solar system. During this time, humanity also created a race of machines known as the Exo, sentient and powerful robots imbued with the collective knowledge of humanity.

Executor Hideo is a non-player character located within the Tower. Hideo is a Human, but does not wear armor associated with any particular Guardian Class.[1] Hideo is the representative of New Monarchy, and sells a variety of New Monarchy-branded armor, weapons, and emblems intended for use in the Crucible.

Humanity enjoyed its Golden Age for many years, but it abruptly came to an end with the Great War. Unbeknownst to humanity, the Traveler had a great challenger in pursuit, known only as The Darkness. Attacking suddenly with brutality, the Darkness quickly overwhelmed human settlements, wiping out millions in its epic war against the Traveler. Nearing eradication, humanity retreated back to Earth and the protective shadow of the Traveler.

Ikora Rey is a human and the Vanguard for the Warlock class, located within the Tower. Rey's extensive knowledge of her field has earned her respect "among all Orders." For her class, Ikora Rey sells Warlock armor and emblems, and Vanguard armor, which can be given to all Guardians regardless of their class

Facing its age old foe, the Darkness assaulted the Traveler, nearly destroying it. In its last dying breath, the Traveler temporarily defeated The Darkness, created the empowered humans known as the Guardians, and forged the Ghosts to help them in their survival. Limited now to the City, the Guardians launch missions from their Tower in preparations for the ensuing battle against the Darkness, searching for some way to bring the Traveler back to life.

EXO

The Exo are a race of humanoid machines living in the City. They are self-aware machines built during humanity's Golden Age for a long forgotten war, with the purpose of protecting their creators. The conflict itself has long been forgotten and the Exo are ciphers, even to themselves, for their purpose has been forgotten as well.

Exos appear unyielding and tireless. Mechanically, Exos are so advanced that only a Ghost can comprehend their inner workings. Whoever built the Exos fashioned them in humanity's image, gifting them with diversity of mind and body. Many of the City's Exo citizens work and live aside their organic brethren. But others fight again, re-forged in the light of the Traveler to serve as Guardians

Cayde-6 is an Exo and the Vanguard for the Hunter class, located within the Tower. For his class, Cayde-6 sells Hunter armor and emblems, and Vanguard armor, which can be given to all Guardians regardless of their class.

The Exo race was created during the great Golden Age of humanity. Originally created as machines of war to combat The Darkness, their memories were wiped and they were reprogrammed following the Collapse to unify humanity, ridding them of any societal or militarist divisions. Exos are considered to be extremely advanced, with only the Ghosts capable of understanding their inner functions, protocols, and programming. Within the City, the Exo are equals to the humans, and are considered brothers and sisters. Many have chosen to fight against the Darkness, and as such have received the blessing of the Traveler in the form of guardianship, suggesting that the power granted by the Traveler is not organic in nature.

The Exo have been described as the Terminators of the Destiny universe, brutal killing machines that would make Sky Net happy. Joe Staten said the Exo were, "sinister, powerful, and tireless."Or or so it would seem, this above concept art shows an Exo clearly in a contemplative mode, perhaps after a hard fought battle. Members of the Exo species have been described as being physically intimidating, tending to prefer armour and using technology over magic or stealth.

CLASSES

In addition to choosing to play as one of several species, Destiny players choose to play as one of several different player classes. Though each player class in Destiny has a distinct appearance, dress, and skill set, player classes are designed to be balanced, with no class intended to be clearly better overall than any other.

There are three player classes available to choose in Destiny: Hunter, Titan, & Warlock.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PLAYER CLASSES ARE AS FOLLOWS...

The Hunter, Titan and Warlock classes have different subclasses, abilities, armor, and other attributes. Please visit the linked articles to find out more detailed information:

  • · "Hunters are the reconnaissance masters of the Last City, who seek, find and destroy those who want to end Humankind's seed."
  • · "Titans are the powerful mechanistic soldiers of the Last City, equipped with powerful weapons and indomitable advanced mech-like suits of fiercely devastating power."
  • · "Warlocks wield the power of 'spells' to complement their weapons and to overpower their enemies."

PSB: Can you tell us more about the different classes in Destiny?

DeeJ: Destiny is all about making personal decisions. The first choice that any player will make is which class of Guardians they want to embody. You can be a Titan, just about heavy armour and brute strength; you can be a Hunter, which is about stealth tactics, or you can be a Warlock, which is all about using the enormous power of the Travellers.

These all provide different options for how you’ll look, how you’ll fight, and what your combat style is. The armour they will have will tell us which missions they’ve completed, which destination they like to visit most often, and so on.

I think the strongest teams will be the ones where each player chooses a distinct role, uses different powers and different abilities. They all have different ways of backing each other up.

HUNTERS

“Hunters once prowled the wilderness and wastelands, taking big risks for even bigger rewards. You're no outlaw—at least, not anymore—but making your own luck has always meant bending the rules. Your unique brand of daring and ingenuity is needed now more than ever.”

Overview & History

Hunter is a Guardian class. Hunters are "quick on the trigger and deadly with a blade," so much so that they have earned a fearful reputation and are known as the "Masters of the Frontier." Hunters were once outlaws and survivors that roamed the wastelands and wilderness making their own luck. Through manipulation of the Traveler's energies, Hunters learned how to survive in the wild. This heritage has led to their characteristic tendency of bending the rules to suit their particular situation. Being the trailblazers amongst Guardian classes, Hunters serve as invaluable scouts when surveying hostile and dangerous territory combining their trademark daring and ingenuity. Some fear them as being too dangerous, but their bravery has led to many discoveries dating back to the Golden Age.

Think "stealthy sniper." The Hunter works best either at distant range or up-close and personal. Long-range rifles are the Hunter's tools of the trade, but Hunters also pack a nasty knife for silent kills from kissing distance. Mobility and agility are Hunters' greatest strengths, but they come at a price: Heavy armor would slow them down – so they don't wear much. That means they take more damage from attacks, and can take longer to recover. So try not to be where the bullet is going when it gets there...

Distinguishing Features

Hunters can be easily distinguished in-game by their signature hooded cloaks, thin builds, and lightly armored outfits, which contain an armor-to-cloth ratio of about 50-50.

Also, as with the other player classes, in addition to helmets, chest, arm, and leg armor, Hunters have a special fifth armor slot that is unique to their class and further helps to distinguish them. The Hunter's unique armor is its cloak worn on the head and back.

Abilities

Hunters' method of attack has an emphasis on dealing high damage from short and medium range. The Hunter is designed for long-range and stealth combat. They have mild health regeneration capabilities and excel at tactical mobility during combat. The Hunter is designed for long-range and stealth combat. They have mild health regeneration capabilities and excel at tactical mobility during combat. The Hunter gets various skill-sets, including an incendiary grenade that can be upgraded to various levels, such as a swarm grenade that releases explosive drones upon impact, or a tripmine grenade that works as a proximity mine whenever an enemy walks nearby.

HUNTER SUBCLASSES

Hunters get a double-jump ability, as well as upgrades for better jump-control, triple-jump and an even higher jump. Additional skills include a super golden gun and a throwing knife. Passive skills can also be upgraded, including Path Forgotten that allows players to recover faster during combat. Scavenger has various sub-categories that will increase the efficiency of the knife skill and gunslinger skill, while also enabling players to get faster cooldowns on item pickups.The last two passive skills include Way of the Drifter, which permanently buffs all the Hunter's skills, as well as Chain of Woe, which also increases the range of the golden gun skill and adds an additional throwing knife to the line-up.

The following are the known subclasses for Hunters:

GUNSLINGERS

The Gunslinger's primary theme is accuracy over all else. Try to build your Gunslinger to take advantage of that. World of Warcraft jokes aside, the Hunter in Destiny is something to be feared. This is the damage dealer; the one who hangs back and unloads worlds of hurt. Packing a Golden Gun and a Throwing Knife, the Gunslinger Hunter is going to be a powerful addition when clearing Strikes and surviving the hardest of encounters in The Vault of Glass.

Like every class in Destiny, the Hunter has a wealth of options to chose from when selecting a build. So far the only subclass playable has been the aforementioned Gunslinger. Yes, there will be more subclasses. How many is unclear. Whether they become playable before Destiny is released is up to Bungie. But instead of wishing for more information, let’s focus on the information given and check out an overview of the Gunslinger Hunter subclass.

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BLADEDANCERS

At level 15, hunters unlock their other subclass, called bladedancer. The bladedancer's super is arc blade, a lethal lightning attack. It can be upgraded with an area-of-effect damage radius, or to unleash a wave of energy, or to make you invisible. The melee attack of bladedancers is called blink strike, which has greater range than other melee attacks, and can be upgraded to carry a significant increase to damage when striking from behind, or to make you briefly vanish from sight. Solo play is where the Blade Dancer truly shines. With a strong dependency on avoidance, the Blade Dancer thrives on toe-to-toe combat, which is in stark contrast to many other rogue souls. Blade Dancers can chew through a single opponent with dizzying speed and two to three foes at a time are also no problem, but pile on many more than that and trouble can arise. All rogues, other than the bard, can feel energy starved at times – but the Blade Dancer can feel downright exhausted.

The vast majority of Rift souls have places in groups as main souls; the Blade Dancer however is not one of them. The avoidance portion of the souls attack repertoire is simply snuffed out by in a group situation since tanks will always want and need to maintain threat. The Blade Dancer has prime potency as the secondary soul to a rogue tanking build though, so die-hard fans of this soul can still get their fix if they choose to go that route.

Pairing a Blade Dancer with an Assassin in a DPS build adds a powerful layer of diversity to the soul. Assassins are the prototypical rogue, skulking through the shadows and unleashing powerful surprise attacks. While it may seem counter-intuitive to pair a hack and slash brawler with a backstabbing marauder, it works well here. Point investment can range anywhere from 8 points – which gives a substantial increase to crit and provides a poisoned weapon enchantment, to 18-20 points which grants some huge gains in damage output and survivability.

Well...Shit!

The soul mate of the Blade Dancer is the Riftstalker, the rouge callings tanking soul. Going together like chocolate and peanut butter, the cohesion formed with these two souls among the best in the game. Typically the Blade Dancer will take on the secondary role in the build, but it is possible to create a hybrid DPS build that can serve as an emergency or raid off-tank. As a secondary soul the Riftstalker quickly shores up the holes in the Blade Dancer weak defenses by adding increased armor, endurance and granting a stackable buff to help with damage mitigation.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HUNTER SUBCLASSES AND ABILITIES.

Hunter Class Design and Inspiration

During a Bungie panel at GDC 2013, Bungie stated that the Hunter class is meant to be reminiscent of the classic "bounty hunter", citing influences such as Han Solo and classic characters from old Western films such as Clint Eastwood's the Man with No Name.[9] For players, choosing the Hunter class "satisfies a survivalist fantasy", and Hunter weapons are generally designed to be "rugged, utilitarian, and quiet." Bungie Senior Graphics Designer Lorraine McLees described the class as a "combination of speed and strength", and Assistant Community Manager David Dague added that the Hunter class "is about stealth tactics".

I'm particularly interested in the BladeDancers.
TITAN

The Titan is one of Destiny's 3 Classes and is the walking tank. It is Bungie's Sci-Fi Warrior or Barbarian. They have a 80:20 armor to cloth ratio and specialize in heavy weapons as well as light machine guns. They were the ones who built the Wall and they were the ones who gave their lives to hold it during the Collapse of the Golden Age. They are forged from strength and sacrifice, being as merciless as their enemies.

I had to extract this clip myself from a trailer...you're welcome...

Focuses

A Titan focuses on taking hits and dishing out damage. They aren't going to be moving quickly, but they don't need to since they can take a punch and shrug it off. While up close to enemies, their skills will let them dish out damage to their surrounding foes.If you enjoy playing shooters as Spartans and space marines, the titan may be the class for you. Destiny describes titans as armored engines of war who can "control any battle with strength and strategy." The super ability of the titan's striker subclass is fist of havoc, a ground smash that damages and dissolves nearby enemies. It can be upgraded to leave a damage-dealing field in its wake, to allow you to leap and then smash enemies below you, and finally, to unleash a shockwave of energy. In additionally, when you're playing as a striker, your melee attack deals bonus damage.

When you reach level 15, you unlock the titan's other subclass, the defender. This is the subclass to go with if you want to be able to take as much punishment as possible. The defender's super is called ward of dawn, which lets you temporarily create a shield that can protect you and your teammates. It can be upgraded so that passing through the shield grants you a temporary shield of your own, or an increase to weapon damage. The defender's melee attack creates a damage-absorbing barrier around you. It can be upgraded so that, while the barrier lasts, you can reload and ready your weapons a lot more quickly.

WARLOCK

Rounding out Destiny's trio of classes is the warlock. As the name implies, this is the closest thing to a mage Destiny has to offer. The warlock's initial subclass is the voidwalker, which has a super ability called nova bomb, an explosive bolt of energy that damages all enemies within its area of effect. The voidwalker's melee attack is called energy drain, which reduces the cooldown of your grenades, and can be upgraded so that killing enemies with energy drain increases your movement speed for a sort time, or restores some of your health. The warlock's second subclass, the sunsinger (available at level 15), has a super ability called radiance, which provides a temporary boost to all of your abilities. The melee attack of sunsingers is called scorch; it ignites enemies, causing fire damage over time.

Can you tell me a little bit about the origin of the class-based system. What are these different classes, and why are they important? What is the distinction you are trying to make between these different characters that people can make?

I think everybody understands that doing things with your friends is often more enjoyable than doing it alone – that’s really an understatement – but even doing things with strangers is more fun than doing it alone, if you imagine the gym or the library in college, or wherever you go to do alone-but-in-a-social-environment things, like if you imagine the empty gym or the empty library or the empty sports arena, those experiences would be totally different in-character. And so, the social element is incredibly important to this, we’re doing a bunch of things to encourage people to play together in proximity to one another. And classes are a great short-hand so that when I look at you, I can have some expectations about what your abilities are and how you’re likely to behave in the world, and what kinds of things I might depend on you to do, and a lot of games have done this very successfully.

Well...then...

I would say that one of the origins of class is that it gives people some way to look at each other and talk about their abilities without actually talking. We didn’t want a world that was totally undifferentiated in terms of playability – abilities – where everybody was a generalist. And then what we ended up with, when you look at the class spectrum, is the super-armored, heavy, big gun fantasy at one end, and at the other end the lightly-armored – or not armored at all – more agile, more tending-towards things that look like magic, like abilities to channel the power of the Traveler – and that’s the Titan on one side and the Warlock on the other.

And then in between, the Hunter, our character who does have a little bit of armor, but relies more on his wits than the Titan, somebody who’s going to fight, and fight with weapons like the Titan, but who’s going to rely on his wits and his knowledge of the world to survive, where the Titan has his armor. An adventurer, I think that’s the right word. So you have a soldier, an adventurer, and a sorcerer, in the Titan, Hunter, and Warlock. And so those are the archetypes that we were trying to hit.

GAMESPOT ARTICLE: Sometimes, when you leap online to play a multiplayer shooter, you just want to have fun. You're not interested in tense battles in which your every move has match-shattering consequences for your team, nor are you seeking to do right by Internet strangers that happen to fly the same flag. You just want to aim your weapon, pull the trigger, and delight in the power trip when your bullets find their mark. You are the lone action hero.

Other times, you seek the succulent reward of a well-earned victory, the kind you can only find when you and a well-coordinated group of focused soldiers act in tandem. You're not interested in individual power, but in fulfilling a vital role and doing it well, so that your team as a whole may harmonize as one single, violent chorus. The gears come together, the war machine cranks out discordant brutality, and you are happy to be one of the cogs that allows that machine to run.

Developer Bungie has been building up Destiny as the science-fiction shooter to end all science-fiction shooters, at least in terms of the breadth of its content, so it's not too surprising that the studio would be hoping to deliver a brand of online competition that suits wannabe action megastars and hopeful soldiers alike. Bungie has finally announced its full range of competitive game types, all of which are accessible from the Crucible, Destiny's competitive arena hub. If you played the public beta, then you may be familiar already with Control, Destiny's objective-capture game type, which features teams of six battling over control points within the game's larger maps. I rang up Derek Carroll, Destiny's senior designer, and Eric Osborne, Head of Community, to see what other details they were willing to share about the game's competitive arenas.

Control may be a team-based mode, but it's meant to be accessible to Rambo types as well as to players seeking to perform violent acts for the greater good. As Carroll says, "You don't have to feel like you're not doing the right thing. Pretty much anything that's fun to do is the right thing to do in that game type." If all you want to do is shoot the enemy, you're still helping, though if you're not interested in capturing territory on the map, you can still take to Clash mode, which is six-versus-six team deathmatch. And perhaps just having to be on a team is too stressful for you; unwinding with a video game means shooting anyone that dares to share the same virtual space with you. (Those bastards!) In that case, you're looking for Rumble mode, Destiny's six-player free-for-all extravaganza.

More interesting, however, are the three-on-three modes, starting with Skirmish. Skirmish mode resembles Control, but revives are turned on, so your teammates have longer respawn timers, which in turn demands a lot more coordination among team members than Control typically requires. Finally, Salvage asks three-member teams to recover relics that are scattered around the map. While one team tries to obtain and retain control of a relic, hoping to scan it and teleport it out, the other must halt the process by disabling the enemy's probe and stop the transmission.

This being Destiny, these modes aren't wholly disconnected from the rest of the experience. Says Osborne, "We can also layer events like Iron Banner [which removes gear restrictions that typically would be in place otherwise - ed.] over the top of core playlists, introducing new bounties, armor, weapons, and gear that players can earn for putting their best gear to the test, with level advantages turned on. In the beta, the playing field was leveled somewhat by the level eight cap, and limited access to weapons and armor, but players should expect Iron Banner to become more and more interesting as they build up their guardian with a wider and deeper pool of tools they can bring into the fight."

Oh, I get it. I'm in this thread because I made "Tenacious D & the Pick of Destiny and this game is titled Destiny so the word suggests a contextual relevancy...Lame!

It was the three-on-three modes that I was most interested in, and Carroll and I spent the bulk of our conversation discussing Skirmish and Salvage modes, which he described as delivering really fun "nail-bitey" endings. I asked him to elaborate on what makes those modes so intense. He replied, "If you get spread out, you're isolated, and the opposing may be tightly grouped, or even if not physically grouped, than at least tightly coordinated. If you get split apart, you're in big trouble. Three rifles versus one rifle is always a bad deal for you."

"The main difference is in turning revives on," Carroll continued. "We extend the respawn timer to--I believe ten seconds is what we're shipping--so once you're down, ten seconds doesn't sound like a lot on paper, but ten seconds is a really long time to be without a teammate. If you get a teammate or two picked off, you have the choice--is your teammate in a place where you can revive him in time for him to make a difference, or is it more important for you to get to personal safety or to get to high ground to figure out what's going on, and have your teammates revive and run in from the periphery of the map?"

"There's definitely some interesting choices to be made," Carroll added. "Knowing where your teammates are and where the enemy is, what their status is, what weapons they have, what special abilities they have at their disposal, definitely makes it more intense."

As Carroll described these team dynamics to me, I recalled how my colleagues and I failed to coordinate our class choices, and as a result, almost all of us ended up playing the beta as warlocks. It was hard for me to imagine an all-warlock team having much of a chance against a more well-rounded trio, yet Carroll assured me that such a team can still be effective. "The sandbox is designed so that you can play how you want to play and what you're comfortable with." Nevertheless, team composition does play a role. "If you have a void titan that has the bubble shield super ability, their ability to lock down zones or protect their teammates while their reviving can be a game-changer. When you get down to smaller team sizes, all your choices are magnified--they're more important because there are fewer choices being made. In a six-v-six match, your individual contribution is more averaged out, it's less important because there are more people making more decisions all the time. [In smaller matches] your team is counting on you to do your job; there's more pressure on the individual."

Of course, such statements are not just hypotheses, but well-tested theories supported by mountains of data Bungie has collected from the beta testing period. And overall, Carroll is happy with how those numbers broke down. Classes were fairly even in distribution, allowing everyone to be the sci-fi soldier they wished to be without having to worry about class equilibrium. So far, no particular player build or group arrangement has thrown a particular game type or system out of whack, but Carroll acknowledges that something like that is always possible.

"Because we're data mining all this stuff, down the road it's certainly possible something like that might come up," says Carroll, "and we'll be able to react to that, but the beta was an amazing success, and there were no dire surprises on the sandbox side." This kind of data-mining would have been unthinkable even a decade ago. Says Carroll, "It's amazing to be able to react to the data. In previous games, a lot of times in the console world, you ship a game and that's it. The way Destiny's designed, that ten-year commitment, that desire to be constantly growing and tuning and tweaking, gives us the opportunity to make those changes, and guide it based on how the community is receiving it and what we're interested in."

If there's a downside to this ongoing collaboration between players and developer, it's the high degree of expectation built into the experience. "We've said we'd do it, so now we have to do it," says Carroll. Players might ask for changes they never get, and the development team might get branded as jerks--an inescapable aspect of the Internet, it would seem. In any case, Bungie is tweaking and nudging rather than conducting grand experiments at this stage of development. "It's all in the service of the best Destiny we can make," says Carroll. "When 4.6 million people play your beta, it gives you the idea that people are watching, everybody's watching. If we mess something up, or broke something, it's not going to go unnoticed."

Adds Osborne, "Launch is going to be a great new beginning for us. We'll be able to see what players do, where they go, and react in ways we never could before. Of course, we're really excited about what that means for our competitive multiplayer game, but it's also a support philosophy that we're expanding to cover the full breadth of Destiny."

It's certainly clear that Bungie intends for Destiny to be the next big thing, a promise that it could very well live up to, given the success of its beta and the amount of talent and resources being poured into the project. I haven't played any of the newly-announced competitive modes, so until that time comes, we can only take the team's words and intent at face value. Bungie's impressive track record, however, makes it easy to believe in Destiny's future.

VG24/7 ARTICLE

It all began after leaked Destiny alpha footage appeared on NeoGAF, and was quickly discussed by members of the community. To avoid misconceptions, Destiny’s lead game designer Luke Smith has since posted in the same thread to explain what was seen.

He said:

There’s a lot of confusion here, and we haven’t done the best job ever of explaining the game or its structure.

I’m Luke, and I’m one of the lead designers on Destiny.

First, Destiny is structured into Activities.

We’ve attempted to build a suite of activities that can suit a variety of moods (I want something challenging! I want to chill out with my friends! I want to see where the story goes next! I want to shoot other players! I want the game to be a cruel dominatrix! et cetera)

These activities come in a bunch of flavors:

Story missions – soloable activities (you can still play them in groups of up to 3!), often with ties to the main story arc of Destiny (the campaign). These activities appear at various Levels (numerical, relative to the player) and choosing a higher level (relative to you) means you’re opting in for some additional challenge.

Strikes – 3 player activities, with bosses and loot at the end. Their goal is a highly replayable activity that will – at higher levels – lead you into the loot game.

Explore – cruise around the surface of a planet in Fireteams of up to 3, taking odd jobs and tasks for the City. You can find minerals and resources out in the world that you’ll have some use for as you find weapons in Destiny that you want to stick with. This is a lower intensity activity

Raids – 6 player, cooperative required, communication required gameplay. High challenge. We haven’t talked much about this yet and I’m not going start that conversation here on NeoGAF

Multiplayer This is for the “shoot other players” mood.

Not a fan of this Portal box looking thing...

He went on to explain how Destiny’s world has been shaped to better accommodate these quest types and modes:

We’ve structured Destiny’s world to have places where you will probably intersect with other players, and places where you won’t. We’re not going to have players drop into the climax of a mission, but the common landing zones for a given planet? That seems like a great place to see other players running amok in the world.

EDIT: Regardless of what activity you’re playing (PVP aside), you’ll see players on their own activities, i.e., players beginning a Strike might see a guy collecting Relic Iron on Mars, and a Public Event begins and suddenly everyone is distracted to take down a key Cabal target for a chance at powerful gear and materials to upgrade your best weapons and armor.

Don't be this guy...

A bunch of folks are playing the Alpha now and we’re already seeing all kinds of opportunities for places to improve Destiny. I have no doubt that in the Public Beta, we will learn even more from your feedback and experiences. I’m not going to get into any of the recurring activities or gearing or class stuff today, but I imagine we’ll start to try and explain stuff more soon...

And now here's Robert Downey Junior. He makes horrible things better...Even the Avengers movie?" Especially the Avengers movie!

You have a legacy of players who are already Bungie fans, and a segment of that fan base is people who play games by themselves. And I hear you talking a lot about the fun of that shared space, but I think that there’s people out there who either don’t believe that or they’re waiting to be convinced. Is there something in Destiny for those kinds of players? Or are you trying to guide them away from that experience to something that is more social?

Dance like someone's watching but they don't really give a shit and neither should you!

You absolutely are going to be able to play Destiny by yourself and have the same kind of fun shooter-experience that you could have in a single-player campaign, which is a word that we’ve weeded out of our vocabulary, but we’re going to give you this great player-progression on top of that, and we’re going to give you as many opportunities as we possibly can to expose you to other people, so that hopefully you’re drawn into some social experiences, because those are incredibly powerful and interesting, but we’re not going to force those on you. We describe it in a lot of ways as sloping the floor towards socialization, without putting a requirement on it. I would say that there’s some sort of – if you wanted to talk about it in MMO terms, you’d say “end-game activities”, but some of the most intense non-competitive activities in the game do require cooperation.

They require a group of players to tackle at once. I guess at some variable, distant endpoint we are going to say, “Yeah, if you show up at this door, and you don’t have five friends, you’re not going to be able to succeed,” but the core experience that solo players have enjoyed in shooters, they’re going to be able to get that, and we’re going to pull many of them into social experiences as well.

 The SixthAxis Interview

We actually spoke with Bungie Community Manager, David Dague, about Destiny at E3, but while this interview happened right as the Alpha test was launching, we dive right into much of the mythology of the game, the prevalence of certain themes and some of the decisions made with the combat of this expansive new game.

TSA: Destiny’s your grand new Sci-Fi opera, and it’s been out in the open for a while, but it must still be quite a daunting thing to be bringing this new franchise out into the open.

David Dague: Without a doubt. It’s the most ambitious game we’ve ever made and in many respects, it’s the game we’ve always wanted to make. It’s an idea that has been years in the making and the time has finally come.

It’s hard work, there’s a lot we still need to prepare for before we can launch the game, but we couldn’t be more thrilled to have people actually playing it.

TSA: It feels like you have this vast scope, with missions that can head off to Mars or the Moon, but where does it end? How big actually will the final game be?

David: So big that you would need a map to get from one side to the other, but because we’re Bungie, we won’t give you one! We’re going to make you learn your way around.

This is an exploration fantasy. Mankind is finally leaving the protective veil of the Traveller and going out into the wild to reclaim the things that were taken from us when the Darkness came to our solar system and decimated everything that we’d known.

So we really want to instil in the player that sense of wonder and of exploration, that they might be the first people that are exploring some of these destinations, that they’re going to wake up the old ghosts of the Golden Age that have lain dormant for centuries and to rescue those secrets and bring that technology back home so that humanity has what it needs to protect itself and to reclaim our lost worlds.

TSA: What’s the real narrative push that sees us leaving the Traveller’s protection and heading out into the solar system once more?

David: It’s humanity going back on the offensive. For centuries after the collapse of our golden age, all we did was huddle up underneath the Traveller and build a city in the only place that was safe in the universe for us. Now that we’re becoming more powerful and that guardians are learning how to wield the light of the Traveller as a weapon, we can go on the offensive.

We can realise that these attacks are being launched on us from Old Russia, from the Moon, Mars or Venus, and we go back to those places – worlds that were once ours – so that we can reclaim them and make them safe for human life again.

TSA: With the timescale of some of these events, this game is set hundreds of years after the attacks that pushed us back to the Traveller, isn’t it?

David: A lot of that is unknown, simply because things like written history and science were decimated when the golden age collapsed. So, the best that humankind can do to recount their history is with the old stories that are told around the camp fires.

There’s an arcane understanding of the Golden Age, but most of it is just rumour and myth, to be honest. So the first people that leave Earth to be out to the academies on Venus or the buried city on Mars are going to confront their own boogie men, he stories that they were told to scare them into eating their vegetables when they were growing up as children!

This game is all about solving the mystery and exploring places that we’ve always wondered about or imagined, but have never been able to go there. Through player agency, we can send them there to have fantastic adventures.

TSA: There are some notable similarities to previous Bungie games, such as with AIs that have been core to you stories since Marathon. Are these intentional and deliberate similarities, to have this common genus to your games?

David: Yeah, I think Destiny has a lot of themes that we love at Bungie. The central figure is something that the player has full control over, we cast you in the role of the hero, it’s a futuristic tale about protecting humanity against overwhelming odds. It’s a science fiction adventure, but we’re able to infuse this adventure with elements of fantasy and myth. You’re using light as a weapon and behave more like a knight on a quest than a soldier on a mission.

Certainly an artificial intelligence companion that helps light the way and guide your adventure is a great storytelling convention. It’s something that helps us create a great experience for the player.

Perhaps you could consider it an homage to the works we’ve done in the past, but we certainly want to let Destiny live and breath in its own space. Our goal is to give lovers of former Bungie games something that they’ll find instantly relatable, but also immediately surprising in terms of its individuality and what is special about this new creation for us.

TSA: You’ve always had this thing with the numbers 7 and 3, and the fire teams in Destiny are set to three players…

David: [laughs] Yes, for story missions and for Strikes, the three Guardian fireteam is the essential combat unit in Destiny. It’s a great blending of the three archetypes that we’ve built into the game, so when the Warlock, the Hunter and the Titan come together, there’s some very interesting combinations of strengths and abilities.

We made a lot of design decisions in Destiny to make sure that shared encounters make every single participant feel that they’re a crucial ingredient to the action. If your fireteam wins that battle, every single one of them should walk away feeling like that would not have happened if they were not there. It’s also an opportunity for us to let the player look at this game through a different lens. There’s going to be different social dynamics to a three man fireteam, than to the traditional four man squad.

TSA: One thing I’ve always found with co-op games that also want to try and tell a story is that it can be difficult to pick up on a lot of the incidental story telling. A lot of it gets lost when you’re chatting with your mates. How do you go about keeping the depth to the story and the world, but also keeping it simple enough to keep track of even when in a group?

David: I think if anybody is more interested in the story than the the conversation that’s going on with their friends, they always have control over their social interactions with people. The only people whose voices you will hear in this game are the people that you invite to your fireteam.

So if somebody wants to go through and enjoy the story of Destiny uninterrupted by the people who are there, they can go it alone. The story of Destiny is something that you can complete and excel at in a fireteam of one. If I’m playing with my friends, I might tell them, “Alright everyone, shut up because we’re going to learn something interesting.” If you don’t have that sort of control, they either shouldn’t be there or you can play by yourself!

TSA: In terms of the gameplay and combat, it’s quite beholden to the action RPG genre, where you have hit points, health bars above enemies and so on. It’s a genre which can often have quite bullet spongey enemies, but have you tried to balance it to keep the pace and feel that people might expect from a first person shooter?

David: I think we’re balancing the goals of wanting to create an immersive world, but also providing players with feedback. Bungie’s always been about providing players with feedback as to how powerful you are at that moment, where the threat is coming from, how close you are to succumbing to that threat and what you have at your disposal.

We like the player to be extremely informed, so that everything that happens in the world means something to them. We don’t want someone to not understand why they can’t take out a boss.

The combat in this game is more elaborate than some of the straight, immersive, cinematic experiences that we’ve created in the past. If you’re fighting a boss like the Devil Walker, you’re going to need to know that shooting it in the leg is going to be more effective than shooting it in the face. So we’re saving the player a lot of frustration and trial and error by informing them that every combatant has soft targets.

PLAYSTATION LIFESTYLE ARTICLE: One Destination Per Planet in Destiny, Does It Really Matter?

We spoke to Denzel Washington about the weapons in Destiny. He only had one thing to say.
 Destiny features the largest arsenal of Weapons in a Bungie game to date, coming in both a variety of categories and featuring unique customization options for each one. While players are only able to equip three weapons at a time (Primary / Special / Heavy), there are several different classes of weapons that can fill each slot.

Weapons will come in different forms and will have different names and stats acording to what they are, where they came from and how rare they are. For example, Staten's Thunderlord (as seen in the E3 demo) was an exotic (heavy) machine gun with a weapon level of 200, 2 accuracy, 2 stability, 3 handling, and 2 magazine size.

Weapons are not class specific.

Rarities are Common (white), Uncommon (green), Rare (blue ), Legendary (purple, but red will be used here), and Exotic (gold). Each weapon will have different coloured ammo in the field; white for your primary, green for your special, and purple for your heavy.

Weapons will also have their own skill trees allowing you to make them stronger. The more you use it, the better it will become.

Weapons stats, as previously mentioned, are broken up into:

Impact, range, stability, reload (speed), rate of fire, and magazine size.

Each weapon also has its own description, but the exotic ones seem to be the most interesting and lore driven. There will be elemental weapons; thunderlord has already been shown and confirmed to have the power of thunder. Other elements have been hinted at by Bungie. When asked about this, Bungie responded, "Where there is thunder, there is lightning."

WAYS TO GAIN WEAPONS

    • · Finding them in the solar system
    • · Purchasing them from vendors
    • · Through matchmaking
    • · Aiming will be a combination between a style like Halo (with a reticle) and the ability to aim down sights.
IGN ARTICLE

DESTINY: THE ENDGAME IS ONLY THE BEGINNING

The Destiny you play after 20 hours is likely to be very different than the Destiny you play up until then, if Bungie’s Luke Smith has any say in the matter (spoiler: he does).

“I think Destiny's endgame begins as soon as you see the way the story ends,” Smith begins. “As soon as you see the way we wrap up the sort of first piece of the adventure that we're going to tell because we want to set you back out into the world to keep going. We want to try to align your motivations as the player with the motivations of the character who you've been pushing around this world. So for us I think a bunch of the endgame starts right at level 20.”

I know who I want to take me home...(Get it?)

A big part of this is raids. Though Bungie has been careful to distance itself from traditional MMO terminology such as instances and raids, the nomenclature is very much applicable to the upcoming “shared-world shooter.” Story quests are like instances for you and your fireteam, while raids – something Bungie hasn’t spoken much about until now – are one of Destiny’s most intriguing and mysterious elements. According to Smith, raids are, in fact, “one of the pillars of the game.”

Raids are “extremely crafted,” six-player, friends-only gauntlet runs that might best be described as gut-checks. Yes, they will be difficult, and they will absolutely require communication and cooperation. That’s why Bungie isn’t supporting matchmaking for them; the developers don’t want them to be played by disparate groups of strangers. But Smith is quick to point out that they’re not like Strikes – the instanced dungeon-like runs that might take a mere 20-60 minutes – but more like MMO raids in that you’re going to want to buckle up and get comfortable for a couple hours.

“The activity is going to take you and your group of five buddies into a place that you’ve never been,” Smith explains. “A place that you will return to frequently. And [it will] demand of you things you’ve never even really been asked to do in a shooter before.”

A big part of this is raids. Though Bungie has been careful to distance itself from traditional MMO terminology such as instances and raids, the nomenclature is very much applicable to the upcoming “shared-world shooter.” Story quests are like instances for you and your fireteam, while raids – something Bungie hasn’t spoken much about until now – are one of Destiny’s most intriguing and mysterious elements. According to Smith, raids are, in fact, “one of the pillars of the game.”

Raids are “extremely crafted,” six-player, friends-only gauntlet runs that might best be described as gut-checks. Yes, they will be difficult, and they will absolutely require communication and cooperation. That’s why Bungie isn’t supporting matchmaking for them; the developers don’t want them to be played by disparate groups of strangers. But Smith is quick to point out that they’re not like Strikes – the instanced dungeon-like runs that might take a mere 20-60 minutes – but more like MMO raids in that you’re going to want to buckle up and get comfortable for a couple hours.

“The activity is going to take you and your group of five buddies into a place that you’ve never been,” Smith explains. “A place that you will return to frequently. And [it will] demand of you things you’ve never even really been asked to do in a shooter before.”

And then, Smith added ominously, “It's getting people together and getting them into a group and making your way down to the Vault of Glass and seeing what's at the bottom of it – if you can get that far.”

That’s not to say raids will be impossible, but this is Bungie, after all – a studio famous for challenging fans with the Legendary difficulty setting in its Halo games: “One of the things we have never talked about – we haven't really talked about raiding at all,” Smith starts. “One of the things we certainly haven't talked about is that [raids aren’t] an activity that we expect you to get through the first time through.

“Unlike a bunch of the other activities in Destiny, where you begin the activity – like let's say you pick the level-22 Strike playlist – everything in that activity is going to be level 22. It's going to be consistent. If you're level 26, you're going to have some relationship to it. You're going to be more powerful than that activity. In a raid, when the raid begins at level 25, it's not where it ends. Like part of going the raid is the journey of gearing up; building your arsenal to react to the situations that it's going to ask you to go through.”

In other words, you’re going to suffer. But it’s going to be a fun kind of suffering that makes for a better water-cooler moment with your friends later. And that will be partly fueled by the mystery involved. ““We don't adhere to any of the standard rules for the rest of the game,” Smith says. “Like, raids don't have waypoints, they don't tell you where to go, they don't tell you what to do.”

But what is it about raids that separates them from the rest of the game? Smith is quick with an answer:

“I think the E3 experience video [Ed. Note: See above] had the narrator talking about the hardest thing we've ever built and we showed a jumping puzzle. Like, the hardest thing we've ever built is a jumping puzzle? The jumping puzzle is just one part but it's this interesting representation of the philosophy behind a bunch of the raiding which is taking something simple, something that you've done, you understand, and then asking six of you to do it together. In a nutshell, that's some of the philosophy that was driving raid design as we were building the first raid in Destiny.”

Surely something this epic and involved has to have an ultimate showdown, right? A boss? “Obviously we're going to have big cool bosses,” Smith reveals. “I think that we've given people a taste in Strikes of what the bosses are and what they can do. The raid bosses are different: they're still big monsters, much like what you're going to see, they're still scary, but they have a bunch of abilities that are unlike anything you've really experienced in a shooter before. And I don't say that to be a douchebag and I don't say it because it's a cool bullet point, I say it because when we were building this thing there was nothing that any of us could go home to play to try and learn from. I mean we were – as we were going – building and learning and failing along the way to find cool mechanics and occasionally we'd succeed.”

Shit...Just...Got...Real...

Raids are far from the only post-campaign high-level activity at your disposal, however. While Bungie confirms there will be no “New Game Plus” mode, you will be given reasons to want to come back on a regular basis. “A lot of what's going to drive you is going to be logging in every day, seeing what's in that featured activities pane on your director, and then going into the Tower to get your bounties for the day,” Smith says.

My only complaint is that a lot of the weapons look like they were stolen from a Power Rangers' set.

“Bounties are this opportunity for you to create a parallel progression for what you're doing for a day: It's like allowing you to optimize, people love that; I mean I love that. I mean that's the thing that we do every night when a couple of us pretty much play every night from six until embarrassing o'clock. And we're like, the first thing we do is log in, grab the bounties, synchronize what we're going to do, and then either head off to play explorer, and then we tip over the daily activities, and if we haven't done it, we'll knock out the weekly Nightfall activity and get our guys rolling. And then, like, I do that on all three of my characters.”

Asked what a Nightfall activity is, Smith explains: “Nightfall activities come in two flavors: daily and weekly. They have extremely exotic rewards.”

“We want to have activities that occupy the range of challenge for you,” Smith says, changing gears slightly. “So if you're a fresh level 20 you can play the Nightfall daily activity at level 22 and it's going to be hard. It's going to be challenging. But you can get through it, maybe. Maybe if you have some friends. The weekly Nightfall activity is something that pushes all the way out as far as the leveling allows you to go in Destiny. So it ends up occupying at the far end of the spectrum: this extremely high gameplay investment challenge. Like it's both the toughest guys we can throw at you that's going to require the best gear, and it's going to have a bunch of modifiers on it that make it even harder.”

Back to the smorgasbord of endgame content. “After level 20 there are a bunch of Strikes that become available to you,” Smith adds. “So the first thing that you're going to jump into is probably Strikes and PvP. In Strikes and PvP you're going to be accumulating reputation with the Vanguard, and also currency. And you use that currency potentially to buy legendary gear, faster Sparrows, so it's this one axis.” We can also look forward to a daily story chapter, Smith adds. 5k Raids should keep you busy for quite some time.

BY RYAN MCCAFFREYThe Destiny you play after 20 hours is likely to be very different than the Destiny you play up until then, if Bungie’s Luke Smith has any say in the matter (spoiler: he does).

“I think Destiny's endgame begins as soon as you see the way the story ends,” Smith begins. “As soon as you see the way we wrap up the sort of first piece of the adventure that we're going to tell because we want to set you back out into the world to keep going. We want to try to align your motivations as the player with the motivations of the character who you've been pushing around this world. So for us I think a bunch of the endgame starts right at level 20.”

A big part of this is raids. Though Bungie has been careful to distance itself from traditional MMO terminology such as instances and raids, the nomenclature is very much applicable to the upcoming “shared-world shooter.” Story quests are like instances for you and your fireteam, while raids – something Bungie hasn’t spoken much about until now – are one of Destiny’s most intriguing and mysterious elements. According to Smith, raids are, in fact, “one of the pillars of the game.”

Um...I think your pistol's on fire...

Raids are “extremely crafted,” six-player, friends-only gauntlet runs that might best be described as gut-checks. Yes, they will be difficult, and they will absolutely require communication and cooperation. That’s why Bungie isn’t supporting matchmaking for them; the developers don’t want them to be played by disparate groups of strangers. But Smith is quick to point out that they’re not like Strikes – the instanced dungeon-like runs that might take a mere 20-60 minutes – but more like MMO raids in that you’re going to want to buckle up and get comfortable for a couple hours.

“The activity is going to take you and your group of five buddies into a place that you’ve never been,” Smith explains. “A place that you will return to frequently. And [it will] demand of you things you’ve never even really been asked to do in a shooter before.”

This brings with it a number of unique challenges, chief among them being, How do you do this in a shooter and make it fun? Smith has been pondering the same question.

“Often times in MMO raiding – of which I have done a fair bit of,” he begins, “You end up battling against the UI. You're battling against your add-ons. You're battling against clicking. It's not kinetic; it's not an action game.”

He continues: “How do we make something that leverages all of the feelings of the raiding that we understand from a game like Warcraft or EverQuest: cooperation, relying on each other, teamwork, and how do you marry that with a game where you jump, shoot, have abilities, supers, grenades that you activate? How do we bring those things together, and then, on top of all that, create an activity where everyone in the activity has a job, they have a role?”

And then, Smith added ominously, “It's getting people together and getting them into a group and making your way down to the Vault of Glass and seeing what's at the bottom of it – if you can get that far.”

Never snipe twice from the same vantage point...Rookie Mistake. I'd hate to see it.

That’s not to say raids will be impossible, but this is Bungie, after all – a studio famous for challenging fans with the Legendary difficulty setting in its Halo games: “One of the things we have never talked about – we haven't really talked about raiding at all,” Smith starts. “One of the things we certainly haven't talked about is that [raids aren’t] an activity that we expect you to get through the first time through.

“Unlike a bunch of the other activities in Destiny, where you begin the activity – like let's say you pick the level-22 Strike playlist – everything in that activity is going to be level 22. It's going to be consistent. If you're level 26, you're going to have some relationship to it. You're going to be more powerful than that activity. In a raid, when the raid begins at level 25, it's not where it ends. Like part of going the raid is the journey of gearing up; building your arsenal to react to the situations that it's going to ask you to go through.”

In other words, you’re going to suffer. But it’s going to be a fun kind of suffering that makes for a better water-cooler moment with your friends later. And that will be partly fueled by the mystery involved. ““We don't adhere to any of the standard rules for the rest of the game,” Smith says. “Like, raids don't have waypoints, they don't tell you where to go, they don't tell you what to do.”

But what is it about raids that separates them from the rest of the game? Smith is quick with an answer:

“I think the E3 experience video [Ed. Note: See above] had the narrator talking about the hardest thing we've ever built and we showed a jumping puzzle. Like, the hardest thing we've ever built is a jumping puzzle? The jumping puzzle is just one part but it's this interesting representation of the philosophy behind a bunch of the raiding which is taking something simple, something that you've done, you understand, and then asking six of you to do it together. In a nutshell, that's some of the philosophy that was driving raid design as we were building the first raid in Destiny.”

Seriously? Tell me this doesn't look like a power rangers assembled toy gun!

Surely something this epic and involved has to have an ultimate showdown, right? A boss? “Obviously we're going to have big cool bosses,” Smith reveals. “I think that we've given people a taste in Strikes of what the bosses are and what they can do. The raid bosses are different: they're still big monsters, much like what you're going to see, they're still scary, but they have a bunch of abilities that are unlike anything you've really experienced in a shooter before. And I don't say that to be a douchebag and I don't say it because it's a cool bullet point, I say it because when we were building this thing there was nothing that any of us could go home to play to try and learn from. I mean we were – as we were going – building and learning and failing along the way to find cool mechanics and occasionally we'd succeed.”

Raids are far from the only post-campaign high-level activity at your disposal, however. While Bungie confirms there will be no “New Game Plus” mode, you will be given reasons to want to come back on a regular basis. “A lot of what's going to drive you is going to be logging in every day, seeing what's in that featured activities pane on your director, and then going into the Tower to get your bounties for the day,” Smith says.

“Bounties are this opportunity for you to create a parallel progression for what you're doing for a day: It's like allowing you to optimize, people love that; I mean I love that. I mean that's the thing that we do every night when a couple of us pretty much play every night from six until embarrassing o'clock. And we're like, the first thing we do is log in, grab the bounties, synchronize what we're going to do, and then either head off to play explorer, and then we tip over the daily activities, and if we haven't done it, we'll knock out the weekly Nightfall activity and get our guys rolling. And then, like, I do that on all three of my characters.”

Here are some more guns for your viewing pleasure

Asked what a Nightfall activity is, Smith explains: “Nightfall activities come in two flavors: daily and weekly. They have extremely exotic rewards.”

“We want to have activities that occupy the range of challenge for you,” Smith says, changing gears slightly. “So if you're a fresh level 20 you can play the Nightfall daily activity at level 22 and it's going to be hard. It's going to be challenging. But you can get through it, maybe. Maybe if you have some friends. The weekly Nightfall activity is something that pushes all the way out as far as the leveling allows you to go in Destiny. So it ends up occupying at the far end of the spectrum: this extremely high gameplay investment challenge. Like it's both the toughest guys we can throw at you that's going to require the best gear, and it's going to have a bunch of modifiers on it that make it even harder.”

In other somewhat related news...

Back to the smorgasbord of endgame content. “After level 20 there are a bunch of Strikes that become available to you,” Smith adds. “So the first thing that you're going to jump into is probably Strikes and PvP. In Strikes and PvP you're going to be accumulating reputation with the Vanguard, and also currency. And you use that currency potentially to buy legendary gear, faster Sparrows, so it's this one axis.” We can also look forward to a daily story chapter, Smith adds.

These look so badass

Still, it’s clear that raids are what are nearest and dearest to Smith’s heart when it comes to Destiny’s post-campaign content. But even he acknowledges that they might not please all players. “Raids are a really big bet for us,” he explains. “It's a bit of a risk. Because the activity requires you to have a group of five other friends to play with.”

Just in case you're wondering...

Of course, Bungie employed this same tactic with Halo 3: ODST’s Firefight mode, and the lack of matchmaking certainly didn’t derail the gametype’s popularity. Smith is pragmatic with regards to his optimism: “Like, if the worst thing that happens is you get your group together and you all have a great time, and make your way through the first difficulty level of the raid? Wow, that's going to be awesome. I bet you'll want to come back. Hopefully the gear makes you want to come back.”

Couldn't have said it better myself, Denzel.
Seems only right

Bungie has released images and details on the Shrike, one of the drivable vehicles in Destiny. The Shrike is a one-man vehicle that players can use to quickly reach their next mission.

It's a very bare bones vehicle. There's an engine, a seat, and a couple handles. On the bright side, the lack of weapons and armor means it's extremely fast.

"The ability to summon a vehicle on demand turns you and your friends into a futuristic biker gang,” Destiny art director Tom Doyle said on the Bungie website. "Getting from point A to point B should be fun… not a menu option."

This section is boring because not much is known about Vehcles...Sorry...

I have mixed feelings about player vehicles. On the one hand, it's nice to be able to zip around a game world quickly. On the other hand, I've always been a fan of instant quick travel. I just hope the rides between objectives are short and eventful.

The Shrike has one of three different paint schemes depending on your character's class. The paint job will change over time as well as you rack up experience in the game. It's not clear whether the Shrike gets any non-cosmetic upgrades, though. Maybe not, considering the fact that it's built for quick transportation alone.

Ya don't say...

Bungie will offer players other vehicles as well. The very first concept art revealed another land-vehicle called the Pike. The Pike looks large enough to accommodate weapons but Bungie hasn't said much about them. All we know thus far is that it's made by the Fallen, one of the alien races you'll fight in Destiny.

The development team said they'll announce details on other vehicles in the game soon. They warned that everything they show is subject to change, though. Destiny won't be out until September so the game's going to undergo plenty of revisions before then. For example, the Shrike was once called the Sparrow. I wouldn't be surprised if they change the Pike's name now so the two vehicle names don't rhyme. They don't want things to be too easy for Destiny rappers, do they?

The Sparrow

The Sparrow is a small, speedy, one-person, land-based vehicle used for rapid, local transportation. Sparrows are used by Guardians to quickly get from place to place within a map or area of the game.

Each Guardian has at least one unique, personalized Sparrow, stored in that player's spaceship.

Initially, a new player will begin with a Shrike with one of three paint schemes that correspond to the player's class. As a player gains experience, one can obtain other types of Sparrows and/or upgrade his or her Shrike's appearance to reflect that progression.

Design and Inspiration:

If you're not doing it like this, you're doing it wrong.

Sparrows are designed to be in keeping with Destiny's overarching fantasy theme elements, giving the "knights" of the Destiny world a "horse" to ride. Bungie Art Lead Tom Doyle stated that the Shrike, in particular, was inspired by wanting to give players "the experience of having a glorious beast to convey them from place to place - something that represented them." It is designed to make getting from place to place "fun... not a menu option."

Sparrows are designed to be upgradeable and personal to players, allowing players to have pride in their own Sparrows and giving a group of players on Sparrows the appearance of a "futuristic biker gang."

Exclusive Variation

Pre-ordering Destiny at GameStop (in the United States) and GAME (in the United Kingdom) grants customers access to a retailer-exclusive "Upgraded Red Sparrow" paint job. These retailers state that for this exclusive Sparrow, "better acceleration, higher top speed and higher durability plating can be attained through gameplay." The bonus is valid through the end of 2014 and is extended to all existing pre-orders, as are any bonuses announced at later dates.

The Pike

The Pike is a land-based vehicle in Destiny. The Pike is manufactured and used by the Fallen, but it can be used by Guardians as well. The Pike can be piloted by a single Guardian, and moves quickly in a manner very similar to that of the Sparrow. It has a boost function, in addition to two forward autocannons that fire plasma rapidly at first, but slow down the longer the trigger is held.

The Interceptor

The Interceptor is a land-based vehicle in Destiny. The Interceptor is a wide, sluggish hovercraft with cannons that fire rockets powerful enough to kill an enemy player instantly with one hit. It has an intermittent boost that provides a one-second burst of speed every few seconds. While the vehicle boosting, the cannons fold in and cannot be used. Boosting the Interceptor into a turret will instantly destroy the turret.

Don't you hate when you have somewhere to be but your vehicle wants to take a nap?
#2 Posted by BldgIrsh (1810 posts) -

It looks bland.

Anyways, did you just ignore the cynical Brit?

(I hope this is copy and paste from somewhere else.)

#3 Posted by Bigboi500 (29422 posts) -

Best hype thread ever. Mods, don't you dare lock this or I'll hate you forever!

AAA (9.0) is my prediction.

#4 Edited by speedfreak48t5p (7122 posts) -

Sorry bro, you need at least 500 posts to make a thread. inb4lock

#5 Posted by lostrib (35080 posts) -

so much work for a thread that will get locked

flagged

#6 Edited by PhazonBlazer (11650 posts) -

Jesus dude, how long did you work on this? This is insane

#7 Posted by bobbetybob (19213 posts) -

8/10, another solidly made game, with plenty of content that's dull as fuck.

#8 Edited by Kaze_no_Mirai (11159 posts) -

@speedfreak48t5p said:

Sorry bro, you need at least 500 posts to make a thread. inb4lock

Wow, I had not noticed that. Sucks if it gets locked. This should be an exception to that rule but then others would whine about it.

This is easily one of the best hype threads ever posted here.

#9 Posted by freedomfreak (39420 posts) -

Your hype threads always contains too much information, man. It's just bloated.

#10 Posted by GamingElite021 (30 posts) -

nice thread. too bad game looks terrible and another shallow console shooter.

#11 Edited by which_wich (175 posts) -

In the past few years, many apps for phones and tablets have been released that communicate with a game in some way. Watch Dogs, Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag, Battlefield 4, and Dead Rising 3 all have dedicated companion apps that aim to extend the game experience beyond the TV screen. Bungie, the developer of Destiny, is joining this trend and trying to make an app that's helpful and useful for players.

According to IGN, the mobile app will bring a wealth of character management options, including the ability to change armor in the app and have the game respond instantly. Your character is rendered in a 3D model in the app, as well. You will also be able to monitor your inventory and check out the loot you've acquired on missions. Vendors in Destiny's hub, the Tower, will also show up in the app, so you can see who is selling what.

The app also acts as a compendium of Destiny's lore. The Grimoire allows you to read about the characters, places, and events you come across during your playthrough of the game.

Destiny's companion app launches on iOS and Android when the game's closed beta test goes live this week for Playstation 4 and PlayStation 3, and next week for Xbox 360 and Xbox One. On iOS, only an iPhone version will be available during the beta, but when the game releases fully, the app will get an iPad version. It is compatible with all versions of the game, across Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, and PS4.

If you have a code, you can play Destiny's beta on PS4 and PS3 on July 17, and on Xbox 360 and Xbox One on July 23. According to recent rumors, the beta will include four story chapters and competitive multiplayer. The full game launches on September 9.

Gamespot: Seven Facts About Destiny You Might Have Missed

Destiny will never reach a final level of balance

"We have an evolving understanding of balance. In the past you might have characterized our idea of successful balance as getting it to the point where we could [stop working on the game] and it would be perfect. Nobody had to touch it anymore and it would just be a shining gem for all time. But the problem is, those games don't hold a community the same way as a living game like League of Legends or Dota 2. Those games can build these amazing communities around them because they're changing and evolving. There's a metagame that develops over time. The thing that was awesome before is not so awesome now. The thing that you didn't think about before is suddenly the best idea you ever had."

"That kind of dynamic balance where the game is ebbing and flowing, changing and circulating, we understand that and want more of that now. We want to build a game that's always exciting and entertaining, and not just exciting and entertaining because it achieved a final singularity point." - Tyson Green, lead investment designer

Everything in multiplayer is designed with a counter in mind

"We definitely believe that something can be powerful as long as there's a way to deal with it. That's a hard balance to strike, but that's the reason we play the game every single day. We're constantly looking at these things to make sure there's no one thing that's so extremely powerful that no one is ever going to deal with it."

"[For example], when you use your vertical movement modes, you're actually getting rid of your ability to be in combat for a short amount of time. So if you want to double-jump, if you want to glide, you're putting yourself in what we call weapon-down. You're making a tactical choice at that point. Like, I want to take the high road right now and get away from combat, but I can't just sit in the air and fire on people. That's now how it works." - Lars Bakken, lead multiplayer designer

You'll need to make lasting choices

"We're going in a little bit of a different direction from some of the recent RPGs where they really never asked the player to make any commitments. We want players to actually do some things that they may be locked into, at least for some period of time. Because we feel like that allows a person to actually make a different decision from another person and not just immediately copy the decision that's optimal. Everyone doesn't just go to a website and say, what's the best build? We're trying to give people the opportunity to distinguish themselves. Commitment is part of that. When nobody is committed to anything, nobody's distinct either." - Tyson Green, lead investment designer

Bungie was founded in 1991 with two simple goals:

    • Develop kick ass games that combine state-of-the-art technology with uncompromising art, captivating storytelling, and deep gameplay.
    • Sell enough copies of those games to fund our ongoing quest for total World Domination.

Now located in bustling downtown Bellevue, Washington, Bungie has spent the last decade forging the Halo series into an award-winning global entertainment phenomenon. But our pedigree goes back further than Halo. Over the past twenty years we also created a bunch of other fun games, including the Marathon Trilogy and the first two Myth games, hailed as classics by critics, gamers, and our parents alike.

We were just getting warmed up.

Now we find ourselves at the beginning of a bold and ambitious new adventure. Armed with the best talent, state-of-the-art technology, and the finest community on the planet, we’re preparing to unleash our newest creation upon the world.

If you want to tell our story, that would be awesome - especially if you use the right assets. Just like superheroes and sports teams, we can be dangerously specific about the symbols people use to identify us. That's why we have places where you can grab everything you need to talk about Bungie, or our new game called Destiny.

In 1999, Bungie announced its next product, Halo, originally intended to be a TPS game for Windows and Macintosh. Halo's public unveiling occurred at the Macworld Expo 1999 keynote address by Apple's then-interim-CEO Steve Jobs (after a closed-door screening at E3 in 1999).

Coincidence? I think Nut!

On June 19, 2000, soon after Halo's preview at Electronic Entertainment Expo 2000, Microsoft announced that it had acquired Bungie Software and that Bungie would become a part of the Microsoft Game Division under the name Bungie Studios. Halo would be developed as an exclusive, FPS title for the Xbox. The reasons for Bungie accepting Microsoft's offer were varied. Jones stated that "I don't remember the details exactly, it was all a blur. We'd been talking to people for years and years—before we even published Marathon, Activision made a serious offer. But the chance to work on Xbox—the chance to work with a company that took the games seriously. Before that we worried that we'd get bought by someone who just wanted Mac ports or didn't have a clue."

Martin O'Donell, who had joined Bungie as an employee only ten days before the merger was announced, remembers that the stability of the Xbox as a development platform was not the only benefit. Around the same time, it was discovered that Asian versions of Myth II could entirely erase a player's hard drive; the glitch led to a massive recall of the games right before they shipped,which cost Bungie nearly one million dollars. O'Donnell stated in a Bungie podcast that this recall created some financial uncertainty, although accepting the offer was not something "Bungie had to do." Seropian and Jones had refused to accept Microsoft's offer until the entire studio agreed to the buyout.

As a result of the buyout, the rights to Myth and Oni were transferred to Take-2 Interactive as part of the three-way deal between Microsoft, Bungie and Take-Two; most of the original Oni developers were able to continue working on Oni until its release in 2001. Halo: Combat Evolved, meanwhile, went on to become a critically acclaimed hit, selling more than 6.5 million copies,and becoming the Xbox's flagship franchise.

Halo's success led to Bungie creating two sequels. Halo 2 was released on November 9, 2004, making more than $125 million on release day and setting a record in the entertainment industry. Halo 3, the final installment in the original Halo trilogy, was released on September 25, 2007 and surpassed Halo 2's records, making $170 million in its first twenty-four hours of release.

Moo?

Ghost Edition

Destiny's Ghost Edition is the premier Collector's content pack for Destiny.

This is your Ghost. It sought you out for centuries. It found you, dead and forgotten in the ruins of our civilization’s violent Collapse, and it brought you back to life to protect us all. Defend our home, drive back the forces of Darkness, find a way to awaken the Traveler, and Become Legend.

Contents

Limited Edition SteelBook Case and Game Disc, Ghost Replica, Letter of Introduction, Golden Age Relics, Guardian Folio, Arms and Armament Field Guide, Postcards from the Golden Age, Antique Star Chart, Expansion Pass and Digital Content

Ghost Replica:

This is your motion-sensing Ghost, featuring lights and audio from the game. May it lead you through the Darkness.

Limited Edition

Humanity has been searching the ruins of our Golden Age for Guardians – heroes capable of wielding Light as a weapon. You have just been found and given a vital mission: defend our home, drive back the forces of Darkness, find a way to awaken the Traveler, and Become Legend.

Contents

Limited Edition steelBook Case and Game Disc, Guardian Folio, Arms and Armament Field Guide, Postcards from the Golden Age, Antique Star Chart, Expansion Pass and Digital Content

Arms and Armament Field Guide:

Many believe the weapons and armor featured in this record are a myth. You will learn the truth.

Post Cards from the Golden Age:

Our worlds have been claimed by our enemies. Now, it’s time to take them back.

Antique Star Chart:

Explore the wild frontiers of our solar system. Discover all that we have lost.

Collector’s Edition Digital Content: The City has provided you with a cache of items to start you on your journey, including:

A Unique Ghost Casing, an Exclusive Player Emblem and an Exclusive Player Ship Variant

Includes The Destiny Expansion Pass

Expand your Destiny adventure with brand new story missions, cooperative activities, competitive multiplayer arenas, and a wealth of all new weapons, armor, and gear to earn. The Destiny Expansion Pass includes Destiny Expansion I: The Dark Below and Destiny Expansion II: House of Wolves.

Be Brave

In The Dark Below, you'll discover an ancient tomb has been unsealed. Beneath the surface of the Moon, a dark god has answered centuries of prayer, and a dark army has risen. Explore the true depths of the Hellmouth. Stop the dark Hive ritual and survive.

You have talked about progression. How do you keep people coming back?

People love to build, and engage towards some aspirational purpose. It’s just fun. Sometimes you just have one of those days where you don’t feel like you did anything. Everything moved backwards. Nothing moved forward. It’s just fun to have an experience where you feel like you built something, you feel like you made some progress even if it’s in a piece of entertainment. I think that’s something that action games have often not really thought about or addressed or provided. That’s not a way in which you’d enjoy action games. I think the joy of action games comes from a very different place that’s more like snowboarding or driving or even chopping wood, if you’ve ever done that. There’s this joy of a physical activity done well. I think that’s why shooters exist. People just enjoy that flow.

But the two things can completely go together and that’s what we want to do. And so in the world of a great action game, we want to give people aspirational goals. In a world with Camelot at the center surrounded on all sides by the wilderness and mystery and adventure, that progression is really about how strong you are and where you can go, what you can do and ultimately which enemies you can conquer in that world. Our goal is to always have some aspiration that players can be pursuing. I had to play Halo 1 a million times – I wanted to but I had to as well, to understand where the game was? And that, by the way, is one of the reasons why they’re ultimately compelling. We’d go crazy if the game we’re playing weren’t good. But anyway, I played Halo a bunch of times and so did a lot of our fans, and it was a really enjoyable experience for them. But I think if there had been, back in Halo 1 for example, some kind of aspirational goal or something to build toward, something that maybe you could even just show your friend that you’d done, or maybe something that enabled you to go into some remote, dangerous, and more challenging part of the world, I think people would have enjoyed that even more.

So what progression means to me is both a power to see more and more dangerous places in the world and it’s also a social token that you can show your friend or you can bring it with into these hard places.

CREATE YOUR STORY, BE THE BEST YOU CAN BE. RISE UP TO GLORY, FULFILL YOUR DESTINY.
Thanks for viewing my hypethread...

Well, there you have it. The game releases next month. Up until the end of creating this hype thread I was actually really indifferent to the game and didn’t really care much for it, but now not as hyped as I'd like to be, but I'm a little less "meh" and a bit more "hmm..." What are you thoughts?

#12 Edited by which_wich (175 posts) -

WIP means work in progress...so thanks...now there're at least 9 comments interrupting the hypethread. My work here is done. Block if you want. Don't really care. I've made it, you've seen it. All that matters...

How long did it take? I worked on it over 2 weeks periodically each day, adding the new sections. All the banners that separate each section were custom made by me.

I would say this game is bland and even my hype thread couldn't sell it much. Admittedly, there were plenty of times when I found myself asking, "why am I doing this?" but then I'd already started so I had to finish it either way.

One thing, a lot of you always ask why my hype threads always come out this long, and why I put in so much effort, and I recently figured out the answer. A long time ago, when I'm on my PC I'm usually writing for pleasure and it was one of my main hobbies, but now, I get paid for it (I'm a freelance writer), and I have to take it seriously because it pays the bills and feeds me, but the thing is it's no longer as fun as it used to be. But making a hype thread is fun because I don't have to do it, but it's something I still choose to do and it allows me to focus on the fun part of it, as opposed to just being mainly about money. So, there you have it.

#13 Posted by R3FURBISHED (10407 posts) -

Over/Under on this being locked?

#14 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@bldgirsh said:

It looks bland.

Anyways, did you just ignore the cynical Brit?

(I hope this is copy and paste from somewhere else.)

Best hype thread ever. Mods, don't you dare lock this or I'll hate you forever!

AAA (9.0) is my prediction.

Sorry bro, you need at least 500 posts to make a thread. inb4lock

@lostrib said:

so much work for a thread that will get locked

flagged

Jesus dude, how long did you work on this? This is insane

8/10, another solidly made game, with plenty of content that's dull as fuck.

@speedfreak48t5p said:

Sorry bro, you need at least 500 posts to make a thread. inb4lock

Wow, I had not noticed that. Sucks if it gets locked. This should be an exception to that rule but then others would whine about it.

This is easily one of the best hype threads ever posted here.

Your hype threads always contains too much information, man. It's just bloated.

nice thread. too bad game looks terrible and another shallow console shooter.

PLEASE DELETE YOUR COMMENTS...YOU'RE INTERRUPTING THE OP.

#15 Posted by Telekill (4435 posts) -

@Which_wich: If it gets locked, I'll repost when I get to a PC instead of my phone. I also really enjoy that sandwich shop.

I'm actually really excited for Destiny. I've got it preordered for PS4 and will start out as an Exo Warlock. My brother and best bud are buying PS4's to play co-op with me and this marks the first PlayStation they'll have bought since the early PS2 days. They converted to Xbox early on and have finally come back.

#16 Posted by SolidGame_basic (17005 posts) -

*standing ovation*

#17 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@Telekill said:

@Which_wich: If it gets locked, I'll repost when I get to a PC instead of my phone. I also really enjoy that sandwich shop.

I'm actually really excited for Destiny. I've got it preordered for PS4 and will start out as an Exo Warlock. My brother and best bud are buying PS4's to play co-op with me and this marks the first PlayStation they'll have bought since the early PS2 days. They converted to Xbox early on and have finally come back.

Thanks. If you want to repost it, shoot me an IM and I'll link you to another place where it's hiding. lol

#18 Posted by freedomfreak (39420 posts) -

PLEASE DELETE YOUR COMMENTS...YOU'RE INTERRUPTING THE OP.

Posts can't be deleted after a certain amount of time. Nothing we can do about it.

#19 Posted by scottpsfan14 (4081 posts) -

That is what SW should be about. Only GS mod team has to follow strict shit rules and will lock this. Best effort anyone has made on a thread.

#20 Posted by Effec_Tor (273 posts) -

nice thread.. even took a bit to load.. lol

#21 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

Thanks, guys.

#22 Posted by lostrib (35080 posts) -

That is what SW should be about. Only GS mod team has to follow strict shit rules and will lock this. Best effort anyone has made on a thread.

Well TC claims to be an alt, so if it's true I don't know why he wouldn't use an alt that probably already has more than 500 posts

#23 Posted by mems_1224 (46724 posts) -

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

#24 Posted by scottpsfan14 (4081 posts) -
@lostrib said:

@scottpsfan14 said:

That is what SW should be about. Only GS mod team has to follow strict shit rules and will lock this. Best effort anyone has made on a thread.

Well TC claims to be an alt, so if it's true I don't know why he wouldn't use an alt that probably already has more than 500 posts

Yeah that seems strange. But still, this is the OP for Destiny that will be reused in another thread. Someone should bookmark it, make a new thread and copy this OP and give him the credit. No way this is gonna be out done.

#25 Posted by lostrib (35080 posts) -

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

plus they got that activision money to help them out just like COD

#26 Edited by which_wich (175 posts) -

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

First time I'll ever agree with you on anything. I think it's bland and there's like something missing. The game has no drive and has rarely a story, and the character design and characters in general give you zero closure and are hard to identify with...it's just a shooter....Just another brodude shooter. I wasn't a halo fan but this makes Halo look like TLOU.

#27 Posted by SolidGame_basic (17005 posts) -

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

First time I'll ever agree with you on anything. I think it's bland and there's like something missing. The game has no drive and has rarely a story, and the character design and characters in general give you zero closure and are hard to identify with...it's just a shooter....Just another brodude shooter. I wasn't a halo fan but this makes Halo look like TLOU.

agree with you guys. kinda reminds me of titanfall

#28 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@which_wich said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

First time I'll ever agree with you on anything. I think it's bland and there's like something missing. The game has no drive and has rarely a story, and the character design and characters in general give you zero closure and are hard to identify with...it's just a shooter....Just another brodude shooter. I wasn't a halo fan but this makes Halo look like TLOU.

agree with you guys. kinda reminds me of titanfall

Yeah, it's either there's a big aspect of this game that we're not seeing yet or the game is really bland. Reminds me of Too Human. If they've spent as much time as they claim on this then why aren't they seeing how unfulfilling it appears to be.

#29 Posted by RoboCopISJesus (1408 posts) -

This isn't anything like a mmo and neither are the "raids" anything mmo like.

#30 Posted by Snugenz (11822 posts) -

Holy shit that is mega...

When it inevitably gets locked someone with an appropriate post count should repost it.

#31 Edited by Vatusus (4511 posts) -

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

#32 Edited by silversix_ (14129 posts) -

My hype died after beta ended because of the long waiting, no matchmaking in raids and only 4 places to explore but its coming back simply because it'll be out soon, finally. Probably score 9 here and im just hoping there's enough content until first expansion/dlc

#33 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

Yeah, I don't see this scoring anything less than a 9 here. I'm not saying it deserves it, but I just can't picture it.

#34 Posted by clyde46 (45439 posts) -

Not 500 posts. Reported.

#35 Posted by hrt_rulz01 (5851 posts) -

I think it's been hyped enough... But I will be getting it day 1 but I'm worried about how good my experience will be as I plan to play it almost completely solo.

#36 Posted by mems_1224 (46724 posts) -

@Vatusus said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

Nah, Halo is actually good. This game feels nothing like Halo. It felt more like a generic fps like Killzone where it just lacks a personality or something to set itself apart.

#37 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

I think it's been hyped enough... But I will be getting it day 1 but I'm worried about how good my experience will be as I plan to play it almost completely solo.

Check out the OP there's some info about Solo play. You might be interested in the bladedancer

#38 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@Vatusus said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

Nah, Halo is actually good. This game feels nothing like Halo. It felt more like a generic fps like Killzone where it just lacks a personality or something to set itself apart.

Could you make it more obvious that you've never played Killzone?

#39 Posted by Bigboi500 (29422 posts) -

lol Halo

#40 Posted by mems_1224 (46724 posts) -

@mems_1224 said:

@Vatusus said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

Nah, Halo is actually good. This game feels nothing like Halo. It felt more like a generic fps like Killzone where it just lacks a personality or something to set itself apart.

Could you make it more obvious that you've never played Killzone?

I've played some Killzone 2 and holy shit that is one of the worst FPS games I've ever played. Controls like garbage, everything is gray, the story didn't exist and there was nothing that sets that game apart other than how bad it was.

#41 Edited by Vatusus (4511 posts) -

@mems_1224 said:

@which_wich said:

@mems_1224 said:

@Vatusus said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

Nah, Halo is actually good. This game feels nothing like Halo. It felt more like a generic fps like Killzone where it just lacks a personality or something to set itself apart.

Could you make it more obvious that you've never played Killzone?

I've played some Killzone 2 and holy shit that is one of the worst FPS games I've ever played. Controls like garbage, everything is gray, the story didn't exist and there was nothing that sets that game apart other than how bad it was.

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay), Is colourfull and we barely know anything about its story so far and yet you compare it to Killzone rather than Halo... ok then. C'mon mems, we all know you have an hard on for Halo and xbox and if Destiny was exclusive to your precious Xbox and/or not being marketed by Sony you would be drooling over it. Still mad Bungie left MS? :D

#42 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@which_wich said:

@mems_1224 said:

@Vatusus said:

@mems_1224 said:

Game looks boring but it will get high scores and sell like crazy because its Bungie.

So just like every other Halo game after Halo 2... check

OT: I pre-ordered Destiny today for the Quad. Usually I dont pre-order games but this time I had a 14 euros discount for doing so w/e. Lets see why Bungie are (were) so revered by Xbox fanboys... I liked the Beta but I'm more interested in the story.

Nah, Halo is actually good. This game feels nothing like Halo. It felt more like a generic fps like Killzone where it just lacks a personality or something to set itself apart.

Could you make it more obvious that you've never played Killzone?

I've played some Killzone 2 and holy shit that is one of the worst FPS games I've ever played. Controls like garbage, everything is gray, the story didn't exist and there was nothing that sets that game apart other than how bad it was.

Sounds like you're describing Tfall

#43 Edited by jg4xchamp (47561 posts) -

@Vatusus said:

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay)

The fuck it is.

Regardless it doesn't really play like Halo, enemies and encounter design is definitely taking its ques from Borderlands.

#44 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@Vatusus said:

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay)

The fuck it is.

Regardless it doesn't really play like Halo, enemies and encounter design is definitely taking its ques from Borderlands.

Plus the weapons seem like they were stolen from Power Rangers. Seriously, check them out. Scroll up

#45 Posted by jg4xchamp (47561 posts) -

@jg4xchamp said:

@Vatusus said:

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay)

The fuck it is.

Regardless it doesn't really play like Halo, enemies and encounter design is definitely taking its ques from Borderlands.

Plus the weapons seem like they were stolen from Power Rangers. Seriously, check them out. Scroll up

I mean let's be fair here, this the studio that had a bedazzled gun and a fucking matel toy for a rifle, so not surprising.

That said their colorful weapons themselves are better thought out than the Halo weapons if only for the fact that they are more straight forward weapons. Doubt we get anything clever and unique like the needler itself or the comedy gun.

#46 Posted by Sollet (7348 posts) -

AAA, game of the year for sure!

Haters gonna hate!

#47 Posted by mems_1224 (46724 posts) -

@Vatusus said:

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay), Is colourfull and we barely know anything about its story so far and yet you compare it to Killzone rather than Halo... ok then. C'mon mems, we all know you have an hard on for Halo and xbox and if Destiny was exclusive to your precious Xbox and/or not being marketed by Sony you would be drooling over it. Still mad Bungie left MS? :D

Its not as floaty as Halo, the AI isn't as good and the shooting feels more like Borderlands. I never compared Destiny's story to Flopzone's. I was really looking forward to Destiny. It was one of my most anticipated games since last year. Then I played the beta and the game is just completely underwhelming. Unlike you, exclusivity means nothing to me because eventually Ill get to play everything.

#48 Posted by mems_1224 (46724 posts) -

Sounds like you're describing Tfall

Nah, Titanfall controls like a wet dream. Every FPS should have wall running.

#49 Edited by getyeryayasout (7221 posts) -

OP's a 10/10, hope it's allowed. What I played of the Destiny beta felt like a strong 8/10, but I expect this game to improve over time and will be a product that's more akin to a 9/10 post-release.

Hype: 8/10 AA

#50 Posted by which_wich (175 posts) -

@which_wich said:

@jg4xchamp said:

@Vatusus said:

Yet Destiny plays just like Halo (with Ironsight wich is an improvement over Halo gameplay)

The fuck it is.

Regardless it doesn't really play like Halo, enemies and encounter design is definitely taking its ques from Borderlands.

Plus the weapons seem like they were stolen from Power Rangers. Seriously, check them out. Scroll up

I mean let's be fair here, this the studio that had a bedazzled gun and a fucking matel toy for a rifle, so not surprising.

That said their colorful weapons themselves are better thought out than the Halo weapons if only for the fact that they are more straight forward weapons. Doubt we get anything clever and unique like the needler itself or the comedy gun.

They should have checked out Killzone Shadowfall for a reference of what weapons should look like.