So how long could this rig last me?

#1 Posted by funkyzoom (1465 posts) -

I had to replace several parts of my gaming PC because my naughty 3 year old nephew poured water into my cabinet. I was strapped for cash, so I went for an all-AMD setup instead of Intel-NVidia (which would have been way above my budget). I settled for the following:-

AMD FX8320 3.5 GHZ 8 core processor (along with an aftermarket cooler)

AMD Radeon R9 280X 3GB graphics

8GB DDR 3 RAM

800 Watts Corsair Power Supply

Right now, I'm able to obtain 50+ fps on almost all games on the highest settings at 1080p. I don't plan on gaming at resolutions higher than 1080p in the foreseeable future, and also wouldn't be going for Eye-Infinity or any such features. I'm satisfied with anything abound 40 fps, and I don't mind turning of anti-aliasing (because that feature is a real resource hog, and usually not worth the performance hit).

Considering the above, how long would I be able to persist with this system, before it is eventually time to upgrade? I would probably overclock my hardware to squeeze out some more time from them, when the games can no longer keep up at stock frequencies. Please give me a rough estimate, because I'm not too knowledgeable about hardware aspects. Thank you.

#2 Posted by PredatorRules (8996 posts) -

@funkyzoom said:

I had to replace several parts of my gaming PC because my naughty 3 year old nephew poured water into my cabinet. I was strapped for cash, so I went for an all-AMD setup instead of Intel-NVidia (which would have been way above my budget). I settled for the following:-

AMD FX8320 3.5 GHZ 8 core processor (along with an aftermarket cooler)

AMD Radeon R9 280X 3GB graphics

8GB DDR 3 RAM

800 Watts Corsair Power Supply

Right now, I'm able to obtain 50+ fps on almost all games on the highest settings at 1080p. I don't plan on gaming at resolutions higher than 1080p in the foreseeable future, and also wouldn't be going for Eye-Infinity or any such features. I'm satisfied with anything abound 40 fps, and I don't mind turning of anti-aliasing (because that feature is a real resource hog, and usually not worth the performance hit).

Considering the above, how long would I be able to persist with this system, before it is eventually time to upgrade? I would probably overclock my hardware to squeeze out some more time from them, when the games can no longer keep up at stock frequencies. Please give me a rough estimate, because I'm not too knowledgeable about hardware aspects. Thank you.

You can grab R9 280 instead of the X version and OC it yourself.

You'll game for the next 2-3 years of max/high settings.

#3 Posted by funkyzoom (1465 posts) -

@PredatorRules said:

@funkyzoom said:

I had to replace several parts of my gaming PC because my naughty 3 year old nephew poured water into my cabinet. I was strapped for cash, so I went for an all-AMD setup instead of Intel-NVidia (which would have been way above my budget). I settled for the following:-

AMD FX8320 3.5 GHZ 8 core processor (along with an aftermarket cooler)

AMD Radeon R9 280X 3GB graphics

8GB DDR 3 RAM

800 Watts Corsair Power Supply

Right now, I'm able to obtain 50+ fps on almost all games on the highest settings at 1080p. I don't plan on gaming at resolutions higher than 1080p in the foreseeable future, and also wouldn't be going for Eye-Infinity or any such features. I'm satisfied with anything abound 40 fps, and I don't mind turning of anti-aliasing (because that feature is a real resource hog, and usually not worth the performance hit).

Considering the above, how long would I be able to persist with this system, before it is eventually time to upgrade? I would probably overclock my hardware to squeeze out some more time from them, when the games can no longer keep up at stock frequencies. Please give me a rough estimate, because I'm not too knowledgeable about hardware aspects. Thank you.

You can grab R9 280 instead of the X version and OC it yourself.

You'll game for the next 2-3 years of max/high settings.

Thanks for your response! I have already bought the R9 280X, though. 2 to 3 years should be good enough for me. I'm pretty sure the processor would last much longer. I may only need to change the GPU and perhaps add more RAM after 3 years or so.

#4 Posted by PredatorRules (8996 posts) -

@funkyzoom said:

@PredatorRules said:

@funkyzoom said:

I had to replace several parts of my gaming PC because my naughty 3 year old nephew poured water into my cabinet. I was strapped for cash, so I went for an all-AMD setup instead of Intel-NVidia (which would have been way above my budget). I settled for the following:-

AMD FX8320 3.5 GHZ 8 core processor (along with an aftermarket cooler)

AMD Radeon R9 280X 3GB graphics

8GB DDR 3 RAM

800 Watts Corsair Power Supply

Right now, I'm able to obtain 50+ fps on almost all games on the highest settings at 1080p. I don't plan on gaming at resolutions higher than 1080p in the foreseeable future, and also wouldn't be going for Eye-Infinity or any such features. I'm satisfied with anything abound 40 fps, and I don't mind turning of anti-aliasing (because that feature is a real resource hog, and usually not worth the performance hit).

Considering the above, how long would I be able to persist with this system, before it is eventually time to upgrade? I would probably overclock my hardware to squeeze out some more time from them, when the games can no longer keep up at stock frequencies. Please give me a rough estimate, because I'm not too knowledgeable about hardware aspects. Thank you.

You can grab R9 280 instead of the X version and OC it yourself.

You'll game for the next 2-3 years of max/high settings.

Thanks for your response! I have already bought the R9 280X, though. 2 to 3 years should be good enough for me. I'm pretty sure the processor would last much longer. I may only need to change the GPU and perhaps add more RAM after 3 years or so.

Yeah I was talking GPU wise, the CPU could last up to even 10 years from now in terms of gaming, if it's not going to die for some reason.

You may add another 280 if your MOBO allows.

#5 Posted by airshocker (31210 posts) -

If you didn't buy that PSU yet you could afford to tone it down a bit and save some extra cash. Really you don't need more than 600w if you don't plan on using two cards.

#6 Posted by funkyzoom (1465 posts) -
@PredatorRules said:

Yeah I was talking GPU wise, the CPU could last up to even 10 years from now in terms of gaming, if it's not going to die for some reason.

You may add another 280 if your MOBO allows.

My current mobo is an entry level one. If I ever decide to go for a crossfire setup in the future, I'll change the mobo.

@airshocker said:

If you didn't buy that PSU yet you could afford to tone it down a bit and save some extra cash. Really you don't need more than 600w if you don't plan on using two cards.

I have already bought all the components. The CPU is a real power hog (or so I heard) at 125 watts TDP, and the specifications for the video card mentioned the power supply requirement as '750 Watts'. Hence I went for an 800 Watts PSU. I knew it might be overkill, but at least I don't have to change the PSU if I ever decide to go for a Crossfire setup at some point in the future.

#7 Posted by airshocker (31210 posts) -

@funkyzoom said:
@airshocker said:

If you didn't buy that PSU yet you could afford to tone it down a bit and save some extra cash. Really you don't need more than 600w if you don't plan on using two cards.

I have already bought all the components. The CPU is a real power hog (or so I heard) at 125 watts TDP, and the specifications for the video card mentioned the power supply requirement as '750 Watts'. Hence I went for an 800 Watts PSU. I knew it might be overkill, but at least I don't have to change the PSU if I ever decide to go for a Crossfire setup at some point in the future.

The specifications the box tells you are VERY liberal estimates. There's a website that tells you exactly what power each component would use but I forget what it is exactly.

#8 Edited by PredatorRules (8996 posts) -

@airshocker said:

@funkyzoom said:
@airshocker said:

If you didn't buy that PSU yet you could afford to tone it down a bit and save some extra cash. Really you don't need more than 600w if you don't plan on using two cards.

I have already bought all the components. The CPU is a real power hog (or so I heard) at 125 watts TDP, and the specifications for the video card mentioned the power supply requirement as '750 Watts'. Hence I went for an 800 Watts PSU. I knew it might be overkill, but at least I don't have to change the PSU if I ever decide to go for a Crossfire setup at some point in the future.

The specifications the box tells you are VERY liberal estimates. There's a website that tells you exactly what power each component would use but I forget what it is exactly.

About 177Watts if you OC it to 4.6Ghz