online gaming and satellite internet

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#1 Posted by scuffdog_65 (245 posts) -

I currently have dial up and have no access to cable or dsl.  If i got satellite internet would i be able to play multiplayer PC games online?

#2 Posted by Rusteater (4030 posts) -
Starband offers 2 way satellite service. You might try that.
#3 Posted by scuffdog_65 (245 posts) -
so it wouldnt work for online gaming?
#4 Posted by Ranger_x8b (5840 posts) -
so it wouldnt work for online gaming?scuffdog_65

It'll work... but you'll lag so bad that you will either lag down games or be auto-kicked for high pings on servers that have them.
#5 Posted by hoket (232 posts) -
[QUOTE="scuffdog_65"]so it wouldnt work for online gaming?Ranger_x8b

It'll work... but you'll lag so bad that you will either lag down games or be auto-kicked for high pings on servers that have them.

one person lagging cant "lag down" a game. if you have a high ping in CS:S lets say, the only thing that is lagging is you, you will skip all over the place and be hard to hit, you will have 0 effect on other players connections, you wont randomly cause everyone elses ping to jump to 100 if yours is over 100.
#6 Posted by Subcritical (2286 posts) -

I currently have dial up and have no access to cable or dsl.  If i got satellite internet would i be able to play multiplayer PC games online?

scuffdog_65

I have the same issue that you have.  I have been contemplating having Hughesnet installed.  It costs a fortune...appx $500.00 just for the installation.

I think your best bet is to contact a sat broadband provider, and tell them that you want to game with the connection.  If they tell you is won't be a problem, make sure you ask them to guarantee your money back if the performance isn't what they promise.

#7 Posted by Aufban (53 posts) -
I'm sure the provider will tell you anything you want to hear...ah capitalisim! The problem with satellite is the distance involved: geosyncronic satellites are waaaay up there. Although bandwidth might rock, you'd never get around the 200+ mile round trip involved. I think you should move somewhere they have broadband service...just an idea.
#8 Posted by Pimpin10 (25 posts) -

i got the same problem...i just got wild blue and the only thing that is stopping me to get a wireless router is how much gbs will it take up on my cpu? i dont wanna have to go over everytime i play online ps3 for 5 minutes. does someone know how much online gaming takes up for satellite interent?

#9 Posted by SemperFi10 (3139 posts) -

I'm sure the provider will tell you anything you want to hear...ah capitalisim! The problem with satellite is the distance involved: geosyncronic satellites are waaaay up there. Although bandwidth might rock, you'd never get around the 200+ mile round trip involved. I think you should move somewhere they have broadband service...just an idea.Aufban

How can the bandwidth rock, but the connection somehow be bogged down by distance? Also, I game with people all over the United States. A friend in Cali is 2000+ miles away, but we still have a great connection to each other. You're logic is a bit off.

Also, your statement about capitalism irks me. The system of capitalism encourages honest trade in order to ensure future sales. Basic economics.

#10 Posted by zomglolcats (4335 posts) -
Okay this is why Satellite is bad for gaming. Because it's beaming your net traffic through the satellite there are delays as it relays the info from the satellite to your dish. Downloading isn't so bad, once you start a download stream its continuous. The problem is that the upload to communicate to the satellite throws a monkey wrench into the equation and causes a lot of delay in communications. The satellite has to wait for the next signal from your dish to change any download stream or send info to where you are connected. As you can probably tell, that's really bad for gaming. I've never actually gamed on a satellite connection, but I can tell you from looking into it (used to live out in the country), I decided it wasn't worth it as there are a lot of complaints about it. What I ended up doing was getting wireless. It still uses a dish, but it rebounds it off of radio towers as opposed to sending it clear out into space. I had no problems gaming with that. Check in your area for wireless providers.
#11 Posted by zomglolcats (4335 posts) -

[QUOTE="Aufban"]I'm sure the provider will tell you anything you want to hear...ah capitalisim! The problem with satellite is the distance involved: geosyncronic satellites are waaaay up there. Although bandwidth might rock, you'd never get around the 200+ mile round trip involved. I think you should move somewhere they have broadband service...just an idea.SemperFi10

How can the bandwidth rock, but the connection somehow be bogged down by distance? Also, I game with people all over the United States. A friend in Cali is 2000+ miles away, but we still have a great connection to each other. You're logic is a bit off.

Also, your statement about capitalism irks me. The system of capitalism encourages honest trade in order to ensure future sales. Basic economics.

People have fast connections to the internet backbone through their ISP's, then the ISP routes that all over the country and world. However, adding satellite into the equation, it beams up the data from your dish to the satellite which in turn is beamed back down to the satellite provider. So thats a LOT of distance to cover. Downloading is fine for satellite, as once it starts beaming the data to your dish its a continual download, but the lag comes into play when you upload or send, because it has to bounce clear back into space.
#12 Posted by zomglolcats (4335 posts) -

Also, don't even bother asking the satellite company about the situation. They'll obviously tell you it's fine, get you to sign a contract, then you're hosed. Do your own research on the interent. You'll find out what I already outlined above.

In addition, the weather can screw up your connection. My parents have satellite TV and it routinely goes out when there is a storm.

#13 Posted by SemperFi10 (3139 posts) -
[QUOTE="SemperFi10"]

[QUOTE="Aufban"]I'm sure the provider will tell you anything you want to hear...ah capitalisim! The problem with satellite is the distance involved: geosyncronic satellites are waaaay up there. Although bandwidth might rock, you'd never get around the 200+ mile round trip involved. I think you should move somewhere they have broadband service...just an idea.zomglolcats

How can the bandwidth rock, but the connection somehow be bogged down by distance? Also, I game with people all over the United States. A friend in Cali is 2000+ miles away, but we still have a great connection to each other. You're logic is a bit off.

Also, your statement about capitalism irks me. The system of capitalism encourages honest trade in order to ensure future sales. Basic economics.

People have fast connections to the internet backbone through their ISP's, then the ISP routes that all over the country and world. However, adding satellite into the equation, it beams up the data from your dish to the satellite which in turn is beamed back down to the satellite provider. So thats a LOT of distance to cover. Downloading is fine for satellite, as once it starts beaming the data to your dish its a continual download, but the lag comes into play when you upload or send, because it has to bounce clear back into space.

Meh, doesn't make any sense to me, but I'll take your word for it I suppose. So your saying that it's 200+ miles just to travel to the ISP for satellite connections? Whereas my ISP is most likely closer to where I live?
#14 Posted by simardbrad (2355 posts) -

[QUOTE="zomglolcats"][QUOTE="SemperFi10"]

How can the bandwidth rock, but the connection somehow be bogged down by distance? Also, I game with people all over the United States. A friend in Cali is 2000+ miles away, but we still have a great connection to each other. You're logic is a bit off.

Also, your statement about capitalism irks me. The system of capitalism encourages honest trade in order to ensure future sales. Basic economics.

SemperFi10

People have fast connections to the internet backbone through their ISP's, then the ISP routes that all over the country and world. However, adding satellite into the equation, it beams up the data from your dish to the satellite which in turn is beamed back down to the satellite provider. So thats a LOT of distance to cover. Downloading is fine for satellite, as once it starts beaming the data to your dish its a continual download, but the lag comes into play when you upload or send, because it has to bounce clear back into space.

Meh, doesn't make any sense to me, but I'll take your word for it I suppose. So your saying that it's 200+ miles just to travel to the ISP for satellite connections? Whereas my ISP is most likely closer to where I live?

the connection has to wirelessly connect to a damn satellite. I'd prefer to be connected wired to my ISP. Speeds are better.

#15 Posted by zomglolcats (4335 posts) -

[QUOTE="zomglolcats"][QUOTE="SemperFi10"]

How can the bandwidth rock, but the connection somehow be bogged down by distance? Also, I game with people all over the United States. A friend in Cali is 2000+ miles away, but we still have a great connection to each other. You're logic is a bit off.

Also, your statement about capitalism irks me. The system of capitalism encourages honest trade in order to ensure future sales. Basic economics.

SemperFi10

People have fast connections to the internet backbone through their ISP's, then the ISP routes that all over the country and world. However, adding satellite into the equation, it beams up the data from your dish to the satellite which in turn is beamed back down to the satellite provider. So thats a LOT of distance to cover. Downloading is fine for satellite, as once it starts beaming the data to your dish its a continual download, but the lag comes into play when you upload or send, because it has to bounce clear back into space.

Meh, doesn't make any sense to me, but I'll take your word for it I suppose. So your saying that it's 200+ miles just to travel to the ISP for satellite connections? Whereas my ISP is most likely closer to where I live?

Ok, look at it this way. Your cable is a fiber optic line that leads to the ISP, who has unfettered access to the internet. Compare that to a satellite. It beams a signal to and from space, which is then routed through the internet. Going clear into space is a LOT of distance to travel compared to your cable connection. It's not really that complicated.

Think of it like this: with a cable connection, it only travels like a few miles at the most to connect to your local cable office, whereas with Satellite, you're beaming all the way into space.