What are DRM free games and why are they good?

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#1 Posted by KABCOOL (1144 posts) -

I'm not totally sure what DRM free games are and why are they good to support ?

#2 Posted by darksusperia (6917 posts) -
DRM = Digital Rights Management. Basically it controls how you use the software. Steam is a form of DRM. DRM free games mean you can install it where ever and how ever you like.
#3 Posted by ampiva (1249 posts) -
[QUOTE="darksusperia"]DRM = Digital Rights Management. Basically it controls how you use the software. Steam is a form of DRM. DRM free games mean you can install it where ever and how ever you like.

And without some sort of crapware required to run before the game.
#4 Posted by Falconoffury (1717 posts) -

To me, DRM free means you can fully install and fully play a game without the need for an internet connection.

#5 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -
DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.
#6 Posted by ionusX (25716 posts) -

DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.SKaREO
if you honestly believe piracy will go away because of DRM your sadly mistaken..

#7 Posted by topsemag55 (19063 posts) -

To me, DRM free means you can fully install and fully play a game without the need for an internet connection.

Falconoffury

No, on most games you still need an internet connection to register your license key. Then you can play.

#8 Posted by Falconoffury (1717 posts) -

[QUOTE="Falconoffury"]

To me, DRM free means you can fully install and fully play a game without the need for an internet connection.

topsemag55

No, on most games you still need an internet connection to register your license key. Then you can play.

That's DRM. The server is digitally granting you the right to play the game after supplying it the license key.

#9 Posted by topsemag55 (19063 posts) -

[QUOTE="topsemag55"]

[QUOTE="Falconoffury"]

To me, DRM free means you can fully install and fully play a game without the need for an internet connection.

Falconoffury

No, on most games you still need an internet connection to register your license key. Then you can play.

That's DRM. The server is digitally granting you the right to play the game after supplying it the license key.

Not if you don't need a net connection afterward.

#10 Posted by EliteM0nk3y (3382 posts) -

[QUOTE="Falconoffury"]

[QUOTE="topsemag55"]

No, on most games you still need an internet connection to register your license key. Then you can play.

topsemag55

That's DRM. The server is digitally granting you the right to play the game after supplying it the license key.

Not if you don't need a net connection afterward.

Well if that key is tied to an account than yes it could be considered DRM. But that is mostly with more recent games. I remember playing the Sims 1 and being able to give the key to other people, I'm pretty sure Battlefield 2 was like that as well.

#11 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -

if you honestly believe piracy will go away because of DRM your sadly mistaken..

ionusX
I'm not suggesting that piracy will go away at all. In fact I never said I don't support piracy for several reason. But I also support DRM because it adds more to the game than there was before, as I have listed. You can't get the features Steam offers from pirating your games. Because of this, there is an added incentive to purchasing games from Steam. An incentive which simply does not exist with DRM-Free options at the moment.
#12 Posted by James00715 (2484 posts) -

[QUOTE="ionusX"]

if you honestly believe piracy will go away because of DRM your sadly mistaken..

SKaREO

I'm not suggesting that piracy will go away at all. In fact I never said I don't support piracy for several reason. But I also support DRM because it adds more to the game than there was before, as I have listed. You can't get the features Steam offers from pirating your games. Because of this, there is an added incentive to purchasing games from Steam. An incentive which simply does not exist with DRM-Free options at the moment.

You can get a lot of those extra things with Xfire, and it works with most games. The only real bonus from Steam is achievements, but not everyone cares about them.

#13 Posted by guynamedbilly (12967 posts) -

DRM Free means that there is nothing between you and playing your games. A DRM free game doesn't have to verify your game online, check if the disc is present, require you to log in to an account or do anything beyond starting up your game and playing it. It's good because DRM frequently makes the game perform worse(more slowly,) requires you to have internet once or all the time, or makes the game start and load slower when checking the disc.

If the DRM requires some online authentication or always online DRM, then the DRM licensing service has to stay around for you to be able to continue playing the game. For example, a movie I have "T2" came with a digital copy that I can't even use now because the DRM licensing company that did that has shut down.

#14 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -

DRM Free means that there is nothing between you and playing your games. A DRM free game doesn't have to verify your game online, check if the disc is present, require you to log in to an account or do anything beyond starting up your game and playing it. It's good because DRM frequently makes the game perform worse(more slowly,) requires you to have internet once or all the time, or makes the game start and load slower when checking the disc.

If the DRM requires some online authentication or always online DRM, then the DRM licensing service has to stay around for you to be able to continue playing the game. For example, a movie I have "T2" came with a digital copy that I can't even use now because the DRM licensing company that did that has shut down.

guynamedbilly
Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM. Some DRM might require always online, but some can either be played offline, in the case of Steam, or just removed altogether with a crack, in the case of SecureROM or other bad DRM solutions. There are plenty of bad DRMs out there, but I would rather focus on a good one: Steam. I can't think of any reason why I would want to remove DRM unless it was simply to help piracy flourish, it certainly doesn't help at all. If we are going to stop piracy we will need to start using cloud-based streaming services such as OnLive to play our games. This way we don't even need computers, simply a monitor, mouse, keyboard and an internet connection. All the processing is done on a supercomputer and served fresh to your desktop via the cloud. This will ultimately stomp out cheating/hacking and piracy all at the same time. Keep your eye on this trending cloud technology.
#15 Posted by guynamedbilly (12967 posts) -

I never said that all DRM was equally bad, that all DRM made the everyday gameplay perform worse, or that even most of it required you to be online. I was giving the TC what he asked for.

Have you tried OnLive? It won't become common at least for the next decade. It uses too much bandwidth for worse looking and performing games.

#16 Posted by masterdrat (1074 posts) -
[QUOTE="SKaREO"] Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM.

You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.
#17 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -
[QUOTE="masterdrat"][QUOTE="SKaREO"] Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM.

You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.

Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.
#18 Posted by PublicNuisance (4582 posts) -

DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.SKaREO

There isn't a DRM known to man that hans't been cracked so I don't see how it protects anything at all from pirates. it just is an inconvenience to legit buyers who want to play what they paid for in peace.

#19 Posted by Cwagmire21 (5896 posts) -

[QUOTE="masterdrat"][QUOTE="SKaREO"] Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM. SKaREO
You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.

Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.

Steam is successful because it's the least invasive DRM out there. Publishers/developers like it because they can still secure their games more on there and gamers like it because of all the features of Steam.

Personally, I do buy mostly off of Steam, but I can see why people prefer DRM free only. DRM has proven time and time again that it truly only affects the legitimate users and when you have DRM that handicaps legitimate players abilities to play the game, that's where the problem lies.

#20 Posted by Whiteblade999 (5537 posts) -

DRM is various schemes publishers employ to keep control of their products. Methods can include a CD-key, requiring the CD to be in the drive for the game to play, always requiring an internet connection, tying all your games to an account or forcing games to be streamed.

They are good because you can buy the game and install or back them up without jumping through hoops. If I want to back up my Steam games without the client it requires me ripping off the DRM and then backing the game up or it won't work. If I want to get my game to work without having the CD in I need to get a crack and find the files that the game needs from the CD. DRM makes it needlessly complex to play, backup or sometimes even install games.

I went against my gut and pre-purchased Diablo 3. I bet you that the first couple of days with that game I won't be able to play much. Why you ask? Because I'm forced to be online when the servers are getting bombarded by a couple million other people wanting to play simply because Blizzard couldn't put in an offline mode which would have sorted out those problems.

#21 Posted by omenodebander (1399 posts) -

[QUOTE="masterdrat"][QUOTE="SKaREO"] Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM. SKaREO
You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.

Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.

Is this guy for real?

#22 Posted by RobertBowen (4094 posts) -

I'm not totally sure what DRM free games are and why are they good to support ?

KABCOOL

A game that is free of DRM has the following advantages...

- it does not have to be activated online
- it is not tied to an account
- it does not have limited installs
- it can remain part of your game collection forever, and is not reliant on a third party still being around in the future

The disadvantage of DRM-free is that the game won't log achievements with something like Steam (but not all games do this anyway).

On a side not, DRM has never, and will never, prevent piracy. It's only use is to force several gamers in the same household to buy their own copies - ie, forcing paying customers to buy more. That's all. Pirates always find a way to circumvent DRM schemes. There is no benefit to the paying customer whatsoever.

#23 Posted by guynamedbilly (12967 posts) -

Well, to be fair, it probably does prevent little Johnny from just handing copies out to all of his friends. If someone wants to get around it though, they will. As for that other guy, I think he's using his troll powers.

#24 Posted by jhalter1 (306 posts) -
[QUOTE="SKaREO"]DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.

I disagree. I know a lot of people are going to hate me for what I'm about to say, but I like piracy because it can be used as a form of protest.
#25 Posted by dsgsdfgf (1004 posts) -

Well, to be fair, it probably does prevent little Johnny from just handing copies out to all of his friends. If someone wants to get around it though, they will. As for that other guy, I think he's using his troll powers.

guynamedbilly

He's probably working for Ubi. :P

#26 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -
[QUOTE="jhalter1"][QUOTE="SKaREO"]DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.

I disagree. I know a lot of people are going to hate me for what I'm about to say, but I like piracy because it can be used as a form of protest.

I totally agree. Piracy has it's merits and I don't discredit all of them. It can help gaming as much as it is potentially hurting it. I think to embrace the right DRM model is the proper way to handle it, not throwing away all DRM. That's just childish and stupid.
#27 Posted by mep69 (1868 posts) -
[QUOTE="SKaREO"][QUOTE="masterdrat"][QUOTE="SKaREO"] Point A, you are saying DRM inherently makes the game perform worse, when in many cases the opposite is true. Because of the DRM client like Steam, your game will perform bettter because of faster and more reliable updates, better more efficient bug reporting methods, and the assurance that cheating will be minimized because the games are attached to a users account, making a ban from a game more serious. Maybe that excuse worked in the late 90's, but in the 21st century it's assumed we all have at least a dual-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM.

You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.

Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.

Do you do your research on wikipedia ? you much know its an unreliable source of information.
#28 Posted by SKaREO (3161 posts) -
[QUOTE="mep69"][QUOTE="SKaREO"][QUOTE="masterdrat"] You're wrong and you don't understand what you're talking about. Bug reporting and patches is not a DRM, it's a service which can be provided without DRM. Also, computers are more powerful and games requires more ressources, so the fact computers are more powerful than before is completly irrelevant.

Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.

Do you do your research on wikipedia ? you much know its an unreliable source of information.

No I get my information from experience. I've been hardcore PC gaming for over 20 years.
#29 Posted by mep69 (1868 posts) -
[QUOTE="SKaREO"][QUOTE="mep69"][QUOTE="SKaREO"] Sure I'm wrong. That must be why GabeN sleeps upon piles of hundred dollar bills and lights one on fire every time he has a cigar. Steam has a license to print money. GOG? I've never heard of them. Do they do something special for gamers and publishers? No. They serve the same thing a pirate web site would, but instead decide to add a price tag. No further support given. Most likely the same copy you have is online being pirated by thousands of people at a given time. You can feel good that you are contributing directly to piracy and the developers and gamers see very little in return for your investment. This is exactly why I hate web sites like GOG who are trying to steal the thunder of Steam using this super-weak DRM-Free model as theyir main marketing ploy. It's weak, and I can't believe developers support this crap. DRM-Free is literally going to be the death of PC gaming.

Do you do your research on wikipedia ? you much know its an unreliable source of information.

No I get my information from experience. I've been hardcore PC gaming for over 20 years.

Could have fooled me :O
#30 Posted by -wildflower- (2867 posts) -

DRM-Free simply means that you get limited functionality outside of the game. Sure you can install it and play it, but you still don't own the software at all. This just assumes that everyone in the world is a saint and no one will pirate the DRM-Free software because of "ethics and morals" etc. Anyway, in the real world, gamers past the year 2005 have got used to having free updates constantly given to them for their games on the fly, they appreciate the community and friends they can meet on Steam, they enjoy unlocking the special achievements, sharing games they like on their profiles, etc. Aside from all that, DRM protects the developer's hard earned profit from being leeched away by piracy. It will help make the future of gaming a brighter place.SKaREO

So lets see, Kick-starting is bad, and DRM-free games are bad. Hmmm... Exactly which corporation are you shilling for again? Oh, and for such a self-proclaimed "hardcore PC gamer for the past 20 years" surely you must know that we were getting many, if not more, free updates to our games pre-2005.

It's also not that difficult to install a patch without Steam: download then click on an executable file and there you have it. Yes, I know, heady stuff indeed....

DRM allows publisher to treat their legitimate, paying customers like thieves and it has zero impact on stopping piracy. It's really that simple.

#31 Posted by aricdolokar (120 posts) -

Some of these posts were hilarious. GOG sells pirate games hahaha... that was the best.

DRM Free is software, music, content that doesn't have any restriction or additional software watching/controlling use. Auto patchers aren't necessarily a component of DRM you could have an auto-patcher for a game that doesn't have a serial key requirement and no check to see if you have a valid license. It would still be DRM free. You could even have a steam like achievements system you just wouldn't have the verification of you purchasing titles or owning a license. Even an always online system like battle.net could have a drm free system if you didn't need a serial number could install the software on any number of computers and have them all online at the same time. The difference here is the account doesn't get tied to a specific license of the software.

DRM has been around for a long time, although it wasn't always called DRM. Securerom, cd checks, serial numbers, in-game prompts for what is written on page 34 line 7 word 2 in the manual, all forms of trying to control the content.

Should you support DRM free content? Sure, if you want not all titles need to be DRM free, DRM isn't inherrently evil. Steam generally has a good middle ground, except for the few titles on steam that have additional DRM. Good DRM should be like locking your doors, you have a key it is easy to use and you can reasonably expect that every key works the same. If someone wanted to break down your door, bust your window, get in, they could the lock is just a deterrent

#32 Posted by topsemag55 (19063 posts) -

So lets see, Kick-starting is bad, and DRM-free games are bad. Hmmm... Exactly which corporation are you shilling for again? Oh, and for such a self-proclaimed "hardcore PC gamer for the past 20 years" surely you must know that we were getting many, if not more, free updates to our games pre-2005.

It's also not that difficult to install a patch without Steam: download then click on an executable file and there you have it. Yes, I know, heady stuff indeed....

DRM allows publisher to treat their legitimate, paying customers like thieves and it has zero impact on stopping piracy. It's really that simple.

-wildflower-

I also don't see why he would dislike GoG. They have made games that were previously unplayable on Windows 7 available, plus CDPR is one of the better game devs.