Thermal paste in my mobo cpu socket?

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#1 Edited by Mikedogg05 (740 posts) -

This is a bit embarrassing, its never happened before, but this time i got a little bit of thermal paste in 2 of my prongs in my mobo's cpu socket while upgrading my cpu today. i've cleaned it as much as i could but i can still visibily see a little tiny color of thermal paste in those 2 or 3 holes. I plugged in my old cpu and its up and running fine.. What do you guys think i should do? Is it safe to put my new cpu in there without worrying about anything? Should i get a new motherboard?

#2 Posted by airshocker (27273 posts) -

Not really sure if it will affect the processing of the CPU but what I would do is completely unplug your motherboard and use a damp washcloth to get the remaining paste out. Water won't damage the socket so long as you wait for it to dry completely before you put electricity through it.

#3 Posted by kraken2109 (12682 posts) -

Can you use a pin or needle to get some out?

#4 Edited by FelipeInside (24624 posts) -

There is a special liquid you can buy (spray) which you can use on electrical components. I used to use it when fixing PCs to clean out things like this.

#5 Edited by JigglyWiggly_ (23150 posts) -

It's safe

It is non conductive.

You have a much better chance damaging it if you start cleaning the pins yourself.

#6 Posted by airshocker (27273 posts) -

^

There you go. So don't even bother, TC.

#7 Edited by 04dcarraher (18436 posts) -

It's safe

It is non conductive.

You have a much better chance damaging it if you start cleaning the pins yourself.

unless you used silver based TIM then its conductive

#8 Posted by IvanElk (3776 posts) -

@JigglyWiggly_ said:

It's safe

It is non conductive.

You have a much better chance damaging it if you start cleaning the pins yourself.

unless you used silver based TIM then its conductive

No it is not. It has a potential to have an ridiculously small capacentence, which can not even be proven with a meter (been tried).

Think about it, you have a silver atom suspended in tons (relatively speaking) of non electrically conductive molecules. Silver based TIM has a very, very small silver content (why do you think it costs the same, or less than other TIM).

So it is virtually impossible to bridge a connection with thermal paste.

Just saying.

#9 Posted by 04dcarraher (18436 posts) -

@IvanElk said:

@04dcarraher said:

@JigglyWiggly_ said:

It's safe

It is non conductive.

You have a much better chance damaging it if you start cleaning the pins yourself.

unless you used silver based TIM then its conductive

No it is not. It has a potential to have an ridiculously small capacentence, which can not even be proven with a meter (been tried).

Think about it, you have a silver atom suspended in tons (relatively speaking) of non electrically conductive molecules. Silver based TIM has a very, very small silver content (why do you think it costs the same, or less than other TIM).

So it is virtually impossible to bridge a connection with thermal paste.

Just saying.

Under pressure 99% based silver pastes are more likely conductive and or capacitive since the silver particles are squashed together to create the bridge/connect needed for transferring heat as with TC having it in socket and pins.... Even Arctic Silver warns with Silver based pastes "should be kept away from electrical traces, pins, and leads.the compound is very slightly capacitive and could potentially cause problems if it bridges two close-proximity electrical paths."

Silver based thermal grease can also be either slightly electrically conductive or capacitive.

#10 Edited by IvanElk (3776 posts) -

It would be incredibly unlikely that the silver atoms could line up in that situation. You may have a higher chance your computer's powersupply explodes. In which case you may have other issues.

Artic Silver says that because they don't want to be liable if something were to happen as very unlikely as it is. (You do understand we are talking about an atom to probably well over 1,000,000 molecules of non conductive material)