Steam folder 64-bit or 32-bit?

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#1 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -

I just did a clean install of Windows 7 and am working on re-installing my Steam games. Since I completed the install of the OS, there is now a 32-bit and 64-bit Program Files folder.

When I installed Steam, it defaulted to the 32-bit directory. In the grand scheme of things, does it mater which of those folders I put my Steam directory in? The save-game files I backed up were from XP 32-bit. So, before I go ahead and install my games, I am wondering if I should put them in the 32-bit Program Files folder for my save-games to work.

This also applies for save games of non-Steam purchased games. Should I also put them in the 32-bit folder to avoid any problems?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

#2 Posted by DarkblueNinja (961 posts) -

Just put it anywhere you wanted but its best to put it on the drive that have lots of space because all the games that you bought from Steam will be download to that drive.

oh Saved games need to put in the right folder (most of them are in "My Document" on C drive)

#3 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
Just put it anywhere you wanted but its best to put it on the drive that have lots of space because all the games that you bought from Steam will be download to that drive.DarkblueNinja
Well, these folders are both on the same drive. I don't have a partition or anything like that. I am just wondering if this will have any effect on the game whatsoever, especially my save-games that I am carrying over encrypted in XP.
#4 Posted by BrianB0422 (1636 posts) -
My Steam files install to (x86). Not sure what that means but I have a 64-bit OS.
#5 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
My Steam files install to (x86). Not sure what that means but I have a 64-bit OS.BrianB0422
All I know is that x86 is referring to 32-bit, and the regular 'Program Files' is 64-bit. I'm assuming that whatever programs you install in the latter folder, will be running under 64-bit technology, but I am not sure. Hopefully I can find out about my save games working so I know which folder to put my Steam directory in. I want to be sure since I have a lot of games...a lot of large games. :)
#6 Posted by DarkblueNinja (961 posts) -

[QUOTE="DarkblueNinja"]Just put it anywhere you wanted but its best to put it on the drive that have lots of space because all the games that you bought from Steam will be download to that drive.matt091282
Well, these folders are both on the same drive. I don't have a partition or anything like that. I am just wondering if this will have any effect on the game whatsoever, especially my save-games that I am carrying over encrypted in XP.

There shouldn't be any problem. When I install my Windows 7 from a fresh, I installed Steam on a big drive and then just overwrited it with my old Steam folder but Saved games need to be in the right folder. if you don't know where your saved games need to be then just start up that game and make a saved game, then go to C driver -> User -> Your User Name and search for your saved game here and just overwrite the old one with it.

#7 Posted by ChiliDragon (8557 posts) -

The path in Windows 7 is C:\Users\*your user name here*\Documents If you open C:\ Users may be a hidden folder that you can't click on. IF you click on Documents in your library you get straight there. Several of my games have their own folder there with saves, but not all. So for the ones that don't, just do what DarkblueNinja suggested, that will help yuo find them. You can also sometimes find it in the game preferences and options.

EDIT:

And put Steam in the x86 folder. That way you won't run into any issues with games that aren't optimized/coded for 64-bit. They will still run just fine in the 32-bit emulation layer.

#8 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -

[QUOTE="matt091282"][QUOTE="DarkblueNinja"] Well, these folders are both on the same drive. I don't have a partition or anything like that. I am just wondering if this will have any effect on the game whatsoever, especially my save-games that I am carrying over encrypted in XP.DarkblueNinja

There shouldn't be any problem. When I install my Windows 7 from a fresh, I installed Steam on a big drive and then just overwrited it with my old Steam folder but Saved games need to be in the right folder. if you don't know where your saved games need to be then just start up that game and make a saved game, then go to C driver -> User -> Your User Name and search for your saved game here and just overwrite the old one with it.

The path in Windows 7 is C:\Users\*your user name here*\Documents If you open C:\ Users may be a hidden folder that you can't click on. IF you click on Documents in your library you get straight there. Several of my games have their own folder there with saves, but not all. So for the ones that don't, just do what DarkblueNinja suggested, that will help yuo find them. You can also sometimes find it in the game preferences and options.ChiliDragon
Ok. What about where I should install my Steam stuff, though? Am I going to have compatibility issues if my saves are from a 32-bit system (XP) and being put in a folder in Windows 7 for 64-bit? And either way, will games have better performance if I stick them in the regular Program Files folder for Windows 7?
#9 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -

The path in Windows 7 is C:\Users\*your user name here*\Documents If you open C:\ Users may be a hidden folder that you can't click on. IF you click on Documents in your library you get straight there. Several of my games have their own folder there with saves, but not all. So for the ones that don't, just do what DarkblueNinja suggested, that will help yuo find them. You can also sometimes find it in the game preferences and options.

EDIT:

And put Steam in the x86 folder. That way you won't run into any issues with games that aren't optimized/coded for 64-bit. They will still run just fine in the 32-bit emulation layer.

ChiliDragon
Ok. But won't the performance be better running in the 64-bit folder, or is that a non issue regarding this?
#10 Posted by guynamedbilly (12917 posts) -
It doesn't matter. It's just a way of organizing 32 and 64 bit programs, but it doesn't affect how they run.
#11 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
Great! Thank you all for your assistance!
#12 Posted by ChiliDragon (8557 posts) -
Ok. But won't the performance be better running in the 64-bit folder, or is that a non issue regarding this?matt091282
What guynamedbilly said. :) Your games won't run any better from being in the 64-bit folder. Just make sure Steam has plenty of hard drive space to work with, and you're good.
#13 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
[QUOTE="matt091282"]Ok. But won't the performance be better running in the 64-bit folder, or is that a non issue regarding this?ChiliDragon
What guynamedbilly said. :) Your games won't run any better from being in the 64-bit folder. Just make sure Steam has plenty of hard drive space to work with, and you're good.

Oh yes, it does! :) Thanks again!
#14 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
Actually one thing that went unanswered. There are other non steam games that I need to install. Is it OK to put them in the 64-bit folder? Will my save games from XP work or should I put those in the 32-bit folder also?
#15 Posted by James00715 (2484 posts) -

Actually one thing that went unanswered. There are other non steam games that I need to install. Is it OK to put them in the 64-bit folder? Will my save games from XP work or should I put those in the 32-bit folder also?matt091282

If it's a 32-bit game, it should go in (x86). Pretty much every game is 32-bit. Just do a Google search if you are not sure about a certain game or ask here. Windows can usually tell which one the game should be installed to. (it will default to (x86) folder when it detects 32-bit installers.) Also for really old games "C:\Users\Public\Games\" is best. This is mainly for 90s era games and earlier. Windows 7 doesn't let programs save to Program Files. If they do this, it saves a hidden folder for that program in another spot, usually in the username space. This can cause problems with some old games.

#16 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -

[QUOTE="matt091282"]Actually one thing that went unanswered. There are other non steam games that I need to install. Is it OK to put them in the 64-bit folder? Will my save games from XP work or should I put those in the 32-bit folder also?James00715

If it's a 32-bit game, it should go in (x86). Pretty much every game is 32-bit. Just do a Google search if you are not sure about a certain game or ask here. Windows can usually tell which one the game should be installed to. (it will default to (x86) folder when it detects 32-bit installers.) Also for really old games "C:\Users\Public\Games\" is best. This is mainly for 90s era games and earlier. Windows 7 doesn't let programs save to Program Files. If they do this, it saves a hidden folder for that program in another spot, usually in the username space. This can cause problems with some old games.

Ok. The reason I was asking is because I know Dragon Age and some other games I have are compatible with 64-bit operating systems. So, I was wondering if they were compatible if it really mattered or not. But, thanks for the advice about where to put older games. I have a few I want to install.
#17 Posted by ChiliDragon (8557 posts) -
Ok. The reason I was asking is because I know Dragon Age and some other games I have are compatible with 64-bit operating systems. So, I was wondering if they were compatible if it really mattered or not. But, thanks for the advice about where to put older games. I have a few I want to install.matt091282
Dragon Age installed to C:\Program Files (x86)\Dragon Age because it's still a 32-bit application. Most games are, and will continue to be for some time.
#18 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
Right. I installed it in the other Program Files folder, though. Hmmm...I guess I should uninstall and put it in the other one to be on the safe side.
#19 Posted by guynamedbilly (12917 posts) -
Right. I installed it in the other Program Files folder, though. Hmmm...I guess I should uninstall and put it in the other one to be on the safe side.matt091282
You don't have to unless you just want to. You don't have to install programs to the default folders. It doesn't matter what folder you install them to, except for possibly a weird scenario like was mentioned above for Win 95 games. I've never heard of that being the case, but I haven't tried to play too many win 95 games either. For instance, I install all of my games, including Steam and all of it's games on my drive e: Directory paths, except in especially unusual situations, are just a category or genre for your programs. They very rarely would have an effect on if that program worked or not. You can install your games wherever you want and they'll be fine. The only thing you have to be careful with is moving folders around. In most cases, you don't want to move the folder of an already installed game. Instead, uninstall it and then reinstall it in the new location.
#20 Posted by matt091282 (896 posts) -
[QUOTE="matt091282"]Right. I installed it in the other Program Files folder, though. Hmmm...I guess I should uninstall and put it in the other one to be on the safe side.guynamedbilly
You don't have to unless you just want to. You don't have to install programs to the default folders. It doesn't matter what folder you install them to, except for possibly a weird scenario like was mentioned above for Win 95 games. I've never heard of that being the case, but I haven't tried to play too many win 95 games either. For instance, I install all of my games, including Steam and all of it's games on my drive e: Directory paths, except in especially unusual situations, are just a category or genre for your programs. They very rarely would have an effect on if that program worked or not. You can install your games wherever you want and they'll be fine. The only thing you have to be careful with is moving folders around. In most cases, you don't want to move the folder of an already installed game. Instead, uninstall it and then reinstall it in the new location.

Yeah, I don't move folders around. I'll just install all of my games in x86 directory then. I just thought it was weird they would have two separate folders. Unless that one is there for when 64-bit games do come out, to install them in when that happens. Well whatever, thanks for your input. I figured it probably wouldn't be a big deal, but this was my first time dealing with Windows 7.