U.S. citizen imprisoned in Iran

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#1 Posted by whipassmt (13397 posts) -

A U.S. citizen and Christian, Pastor Saeed Abedini, who has been imprisoned in Iran for his religious activities, has recently been transferred from the Evin prison where he was being held to Iran's notorious Rajai Shahr prison.

This prison is known for being a place where prisoners are "sent to disappear".

A report by a Dutch diplomat states that the prison of Rajai Shahr: "

is the place where political prisoners who are seen as a nuisance, are stowed

away. Going to Karaj is a severe punishment. Once in there one stops to be a

human being. One is put out of sight, even of human rights activists and the

press. In Rajaï Shahr, political prisoners have to share cells with dangerous

criminals like murderers, rapists and drug addicts who don't hesitate to attack

their cell mates. They have nothing to lose: many of them are condemned to death

anyway. Murders or unexplained deaths are a regular occurrence"/

Abedini is not being allowed to have any visitors, and it is likely that he is in some danger.

This is a pretty bad situation, hopefully the U.S. gov't and the international community can do something to get him released. The U.S. gov't is obligated to at least do something seeing as Pastor Saeed is a U.S. citizen.

#2 Edited by LJS9502_basic (148547 posts) -

Such an enlightened country....

#3 Edited by whipassmt (13397 posts) -

@LJS9502_basic:

"enlightened" might not be such a great term to use. After all the so called "Enlightenment" arose in France, but look at all the barbarity that occurred during the French Revolution.

#4 Posted by deeliman (1858 posts) -

@LJS9502_basic:

"enlightened" might not be such a great term to use. After all the so called "Enlightenment" arose in France, but look at all the barbarity that occurred during the French Revolution.

It's only barbaric by our modern moral standards.

#5 Posted by metal_zombie (2284 posts) -

@whipassmt: at least the french revolution was very revolutionary though it's end result was not great

#6 Posted by whipassmt (13397 posts) -

@deeliman:

Not true. Edmund Burke also considered it repulsive and he lived at the time it was going on.

#7 Posted by deeliman (1858 posts) -

@deeliman:

Not true. Edmund Burke also considered it repulsive and he lived at the time it was going on.

Now you have to ask yourself; was that the norm or the exception? My guess is that it was the exception.

#8 Posted by whipassmt (13397 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@whipassmt said:

@deeliman:

Not true. Edmund Burke also considered it repulsive and he lived at the time it was going on.

Now you have to ask yourself; was that the norm or the exception? My guess is that it was the exception.

you 'spect me to know? I wasn't around then.

Well I imagine all the innocent people being killed and their family and friends probably thought it was barbaric as well.

Vive Le Roi!

#9 Edited by deeliman (1858 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@whipassmt said:

@deeliman:

Not true. Edmund Burke also considered it repulsive and he lived at the time it was going on.

Now you have to ask yourself; was that the norm or the exception? My guess is that it was the exception.

you 'spect me to know? I wasn't around then.

Well I imagine all the innocent people being killed and their family and friends probably thought it was barbaric as well.

Vive Le Roi!

No, I didn't expect you to know.

The massive scale at which this occurred suggests that his opinion was the exception, not the norm.

#10 Posted by jun_aka_pekto (14741 posts) -

What was he doing exactly that caused him to be imprisoned?

I hope it's not a case of:

The person knew it was dangerous to go there and do his stuff there, Yet, he went anyway. Fine. If he wants to be a martyr, let him.

If the Iranians nabbed him for no reason whatsoever besides him being a U.S. citizen, then he should be released.

#11 Posted by Crunchy_Nuts (2722 posts) -

If he broke Iranian law then he should be punished accordingly. Just because he's an American citizen doesn't mean he should get off free. It would also massively hypocritical for the US to condemn a country for having political prisoners when they themselves are willing to imprison people without trial. Such an enlightened country.

#12 Posted by MakeMeaSammitch (3576 posts) -

I say we just turn the region to glass.

#13 Posted by whipassmt (13397 posts) -

What was he doing exactly that caused him to be imprisoned?

I hope it's not a case of:

The person knew it was dangerous to go there and do his stuff there, Yet, he went anyway. Fine. If he wants to be a martyr, let him.

If the Iranians nabbed him for no reason whatsoever besides him being a U.S. citizen, then he should be released.

I think he was in Iran visiting his family. He was born there and has since moved to the U.S. becoming a citizen after marrying a U.S. citizen. He was arrested while in Iran because he was involved with house churches, some of which include some members that were Muslims who converted to Christianity.

Iran is frequently named as one of the top current persecutors of Christianity, as is North Korea.

#14 Edited by Lonelynight (30039 posts) -

i wonder how many iranian citizens have the us detained