Know anybody with OCD?

#1 Edited by bowchicka07 (1069 posts) -

I'm very overly organized and somewhat of a clean control freak which made me think I was OCD but then I seen this video one day and realized I don't have it near as bad as I thought. Anybody have some OCD tendencies, been actually diagnosed with OCD or know someone with OCD? I never knew it could be this extreme.

#2 Edited by lightleggy (15836 posts) -

Lol yeah, my brother. He has even been interned at a mental hospital because of it.

Some ridiculously annoying habits he has...

#3 Posted by Kevlar101 (5971 posts) -

I have mild OCD.

#4 Edited by SaintLeonidas (25688 posts) -

The only time I have anything resembling OCD is with M&Ms and Skittles, or similar candies, and I can not eat them without first separating each color into their own groups.

People who can just eat handfuls are just monsters. *shudders*

#5 Posted by Behardy24 (2301 posts) -

I can think of people who have higher OCD traits than most people but actually diagnose with OCD is a no for me.

#6 Posted by killerfist (19805 posts) -

My girlfriend has mild ocd. She's overly cautious with a number of things.

Every time she's done with cooking, she checks for a minute of she turned off the gas. Even if she didn't use that particular gas burner(?), she has to check if it's off.

She also always checks if doors are closed properly AFTER she turns the key to lock it..with the exception of the car. She doesn't care a bout the car lol.

#7 Edited by Korvus (2342 posts) -

Not really anymore but used to have really bad OCD a few years back; quite damaging as well =)

EDIT: Just watched the video; it's actually quite beautiful if you truly understand how he feels, not just the words coming out of his mouth =)

#8 Posted by GazaAli (22491 posts) -

We're all OCDic in some way or the other, its just that some have it worse than the others and among those some there is a multitude of gradation too.

#9 Edited by 187umKILLAH (1334 posts) -

If OCD means Old Cow Disease then yea

#10 Posted by bowchicka07 (1069 posts) -

What did you guys think of the video? Pretty intense huh?

#11 Edited by BluRayHiDef (10837 posts) -

She also always checks if doors are closed properly AFTER she turns the key to lock it...

LOL. I do the same thing; I push the door in numerous times, with great force, to make sure it's locked.

#12 Edited by jasean79 (2177 posts) -

I remember watching a video in psychology class in high school about people suffering with OCD. One case had an elderly woman that always had to clean and vacuum her apartment. she would do it all day, everyday. Another case had someone that would wash their hands over and over until the skin was raw.

Those are extreme cases. I'm glad I never suffered from anything like that. The only OCD trait I probably have (and it's minor) is that there has to be silence when I'm sleeping. If there's any weird noises that aren't normal, it drives me up the wall.

#13 Edited by Korvus (2342 posts) -

What did you guys think of the video? Pretty intense huh?

Yep, it was. OCD is a really debilitating illness and if he truly sunk as deeply into it as he sounds, then some of the things he said were pretty amazing.

The thing I find interesting is that some forms of OCD are "contagious" (not in the true sense of the word, of course). Like germaphobia...I'm over it now but whenever people ask me about it and I describe to them how I used to feel and in which situation I felt it, most everybody goes "holy crap, that's gross! I had never thought about it like that" and they actually become pretty OCD about germs for a week or so.

There was this radio show last week about a girl who wrote a book and one of her characters was a germaphobe, so while doing researched she ended up becoming a germaphobe for quite a while and stopped being able to do normal stuff like picking up books from the library (which is pretty mild comparing to what a true germaphobe can come up with). I always find that the reason germaphobia is so hard to get over is because people that have it aren't wrong in the way they see the world, it's just that "normal" people don't really care about that sort of stuff (at least until you tell them =P).

#14 Posted by BluRayHiDef (10837 posts) -

I have a confession to make, OT. I have an obsessive compulsion to...mastur...ah, never mind. I'm too embarrassed to talk about this.

#15 Edited by Wopps (2335 posts) -

I have OCD but not in the sense of compulsions like you would typically associate OCD with. Mine are thought based, where I must always have order and reassurance, and I tend to obsess over small things, needing to ask questions that to a normal person would sound dumb. I typically always know the answers to these questions, I just need to hear it. It may not sound as bad as what shows make it out to be, but it's actually quite crippling when it gets bad, and has caused numerous problems in me and my fiance's relationship. Yes, I am diagnosed. My biggest concern is that as far as I know, OCD tends to get worse with age, so I worry of it getting worse. Hopefully the medication I'm on now can keep it under control at the level it's at, which is still hard to control, but at least I can function.

#16 Edited by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@Wopps: It doesn't necessarily get worse; I only overcame mine when I stopped my meds (not advising anyone to do that, it's just what worked for me), thinking "I'm so tired of this shit, tired of being ashamed of myself" and then go out and purposefully do everything I knew I'd be uncomfortable with (and some stuff I knew I'd freak about as soon as I did them)...shock therapy so to speak =)

And all OCD sufferers have the need for reassurance; it's not called the "doubting disorder/disease" for nothing =)

#17 Posted by konvikt_17 (22100 posts) -

My sister claims to have OCD.

she is one of those one-uppers. always has a story better than yours.

she is full of shit.

#18 Edited by pie-junior (2820 posts) -

Brother has OCD. his habits shifted over the past few years, though. not nearly as annoying now that it's mostly centered around germophobia. He used to do some really insane shit.

#19 Posted by Makhaidos (1611 posts) -

My mom has it pretty bad. I suspect myself of having it, but I've never been officially diagnosed.

#20 Posted by Wopps (2335 posts) -

@korvus said:

@Wopps: It doesn't necessarily get worse; I only overcame mine when I stopped my meds (not advising anyone to do that, it's just what worked for me), thinking "I'm so tired of this shit, tired of being ashamed of myself" and then go out and purposefully do everything I knew I'd be uncomfortable with (and some stuff I knew I'd freak about as soon as I did them)...shock therapy so to speak =)

And all OCD sufferers have the need for reassurance; it's not called the "doubting disorder/disease" for nothing =)

Why thank you for the response, that makes me feel a little bit better. Unfortunately, I recently did stop my meds and lost my job because of it, so that's not an option. I was unaware of my particular case of OCD being something all OCD sufferers had to deal with, so I will continue to be thankful for the good life I have with my fiance, despite my illnesses negative effects on it. (thankfully she's learned to help me cope when I ask 100 questions in a night for example, lol)

#21 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@Wopps: A loving partner will always be supportive during your lows, as long as they understand how the disorder works (as in, you'll be worse in times of stress, etc) and as long as you do your best to make it up to them on times you are feeling better.

If you feel like you'd like to talk about it, feel free to drop me a PM. I'll help the best I can.

#22 Edited by playmynutz (5921 posts) -

OCD; liberal mainstream hollywood masonic trifling lies

An individual that can percisely replicate an action repeatly is a genius.

#23 Edited by Wopps (2335 posts) -

@korvus said:

@Wopps: A loving partner will always be supportive during your lows, as long as they understand how the disorder works (as in, you'll be worse in times of stress, etc) and as long as you do your best to make it up to them on times you are feeling better.

If you feel like you'd like to talk about it, feel free to drop me a PM. I'll help the best I can.

You know, I may take you up on that. It would be good to talk to someone who's suffered the disease and has overcome it, rather than who I talk to now who only do what it tells me they need to do. I am not on these forums frequently enough to keep up with Pm's, would you happen to have Steam by any chance? I have that open 24/7. And thank you again regardless, I honestly am rather shocked to find someone willing to help on these forums (although I usually read system wars which is all full of dickbags haha)

#24 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@Wopps: Unfortunately other than this and my e-mail (which I don't really like giving to people I don't know personally, I'm sure you understand) I'm not really registered in many other places, sorry ^_^

And there's still nice people around here, but not many of them hang around SW =P

#25 Posted by Wopps (2335 posts) -

@korvus said:

@Wopps: Unfortunately other than this and my e-mail (which I don't really like giving to people I don't know personally, I'm sure you understand) I'm not really registered in many other places, sorry ^_^

And there's still nice people around here, but not many of them hang around SW =P

I understand, no worries. Hopefully just knowing my particular form of OCD isn't as crazy as I thought and all people with the illness suffer it will be enough to help overcome it. I do appreciate the responses.

#26 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@Wopps: My advice (which you are welcome to ignore) is: know yourself. Instead of searching in forums and articles and stuff (and end up gathering a few more things to obsess about that you might have missed), "make a list" (not necessarily in the literal sense, especially if that would go well with your particular form of obsession/compulsion) of the things that bother you, learn how to recognise situations before they escalate so you can prevent yourself from overreacting (I know this sounds slightly offensive, sorry).

If you're particularly adventurous you can even choose a very minor situation and force it to happen, so that you can step out of your comfort zone (without having a meltdown) and feel a little more in control of your life when you manage to go through said situation and say "hey, that wasn't so bad, I'm still ok". Or if you're forced into a really uncomfortable situation and manage to surpass it, you can say "On a stress scale from 1 to 10 this was a 5 and I'm fine...meaning that anything under 5 will not bother me anymore"...if you keep that in mind (sometimes it won't work but sometimes it will) you might feel more and more empowered to get better.

Most important of all, in my opinion, is not to isolate yourself...I always feel worse if I work at the computer for a few days without seeing/talking to anyone...lack of social contact makes me more prone to OCD. Not to mention, having at least 1 or 2 people who support you and truly listen makes you want to get better, not just for yourself, but for them as well =)

Sorry for the lecture =P

#27 Posted by Wopps (2335 posts) -

@korvus said:

@Wopps: My advice (which you are welcome to ignore) is: know yourself. Instead of searching in forums and articles and stuff (and end up gathering a few more things to obsess about that you might have missed), "make a list" (not necessarily in the literal sense, especially if that would go well with your particular form of obsession/compulsion) of the things that bother you, learn how to recognise situations before they escalate so you can prevent yourself from overreacting (I know this sounds slightly offensive, sorry).

If you're particularly adventurous you can even choose a very minor situation and force it to happen, so that you can step out of your comfort zone (without having a meltdown) and feel a little more in control of your life when you manage to go through said situation and say "hey, that wasn't so bad, I'm still ok". Or if you're forced into a really uncomfortable situation and manage to surpass it, you can say "On a stress scale from 1 to 10 this was a 5 and I'm fine...meaning that anything under 5 will not bother me anymore"...if you keep that in mind (sometimes it won't work but sometimes it will) you might feel more and more empowered to get better.

Most important of all, in my opinion, is not to isolate yourself...I always feel worse if I work at the computer for a few days without seeing/talking to anyone...lack of social contact makes me more prone to OCD. Not to mention, having at least 1 or 2 people who support you and truly listen makes you want to get better, not just for yourself, but for them as well =)

Sorry for the lecture =P

That was totally welcome. I do infact make lists, quite frequently, and I know just the thing I could do to push the boundaries of my OCD. I know deep down I'd walk away unscathed, but during the act I'd feel sick. I've tried things like that in the past, but hearing it from someone who overcame the illness gives me the courage to try it again. I don't want to go into details of what this is, but I know just the thing to do it, and I will tonight. Thank you again.

#28 Posted by turtlethetaffer (16378 posts) -

Quite a few people I know, myself included, have cases of OCD where they are OCD about very specific things. But I'm not sure if I ever knew anyone who had full on OCD (like checking locks ten times and such).

#29 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@Wopps: It's fine, I don't need to know specifics in order to wish you good luck. Just remember that chemical imbalance or not, you're still in control of your brain and even if it's harder for us than for "normal people", it's not much different than any other skill...practice it enough and you'll be good at it =)

When my OCD was really bad I could not leave my room or touch anything, I was pretty much "in jail"; all my waking moments were filled with agony and worry/self-doubt, and my dreams were no different...it was physically and mentally scarring.

The day I started regaining control of my life I felt like I could get over it and eventually I did. Now if it's not 100% gone, it's at least 99% and there's still one or 2 situations where I have to remind myself to ignore compulsion but that happens only in times of great stress and I manage to take a deep breath and be ok =) Apparently my case was much more severe than yours, so if I could do it, you can too! =D

#30 Edited by Wopps (2335 posts) -

@korvus said:

@Wopps: It's fine, I don't need to know specifics in order to wish you good luck. Just remember that chemical imbalance or not, you're still in control of your brain and even if it's harder for us than for "normal people", it's not much different than any other skill...practice it enough and you'll be good at it =)

When my OCD was really bad I could not leave my room or touch anything, I was pretty much "in jail"; all my waking moments were filled with agony and worry/self-doubt, and my dreams were no different...it was physically and mentally scarring.

The day I started regaining control of my life I felt like I could get over it and eventually I did. Now if it's not 100% gone, it's at least 99% and there's still one or 2 situations where I have to remind myself to ignore compulsion but that happens only in times of great stress and I manage to take a deep breath and be ok =) Apparently my case was much more severe than yours, so if I could do it, you can too! =D

I sent you a PM. Looking forward to continuing this conversation in private :D

#31 Posted by bowchicka07 (1069 posts) -

@Wopps said:

@korvus said:

@Wopps: It's fine, I don't need to know specifics in order to wish you good luck. Just remember that chemical imbalance or not, you're still in control of your brain and even if it's harder for us than for "normal people", it's not much different than any other skill...practice it enough and you'll be good at it =)

When my OCD was really bad I could not leave my room or touch anything, I was pretty much "in jail"; all my waking moments were filled with agony and worry/self-doubt, and my dreams were no different...it was physically and mentally scarring.

The day I started regaining control of my life I felt like I could get over it and eventually I did. Now if it's not 100% gone, it's at least 99% and there's still one or 2 situations where I have to remind myself to ignore compulsion but that happens only in times of great stress and I manage to take a deep breath and be ok =) Apparently my case was much more severe than yours, so if I could do it, you can too! =D

I sent you a PM. Looking forward to continuing this conversation in private :D

Dang. It was just getting good too. :). I have found talking about things is a really therapeutic way of handling stress, definitely with matters of the mind.

I'd feel lost if I didn't have friends and family to share my OCD , relationship, and general life problems with.

Good luck to both of you.

#32 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -
#33 Posted by lightleggy (15836 posts) -

@korvus said:

Not really anymore but used to have really bad OCD a few years back; quite damaging as well =)

EDIT: Just watched the video; it's actually quite beautiful if you truly understand how he feels, not just the words coming out of his mouth =)

I honestly hate that video, everyone says how touching it is and how cool and how much of a bitch the girl was for leaving him...but people fail to see things from the girl's perspective: Dealing with someone who has OCD (especially a guy like him who appears to have a rather severe case) is extremely hard and exhausting, I do not blame her at all for dumping him because I can understand that sometimes the burden can simply feel as too much.

#34 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

I honestly hate that video, everyone says how touching it is and how cool and how much of a bitch the girl was for leaving him...but people fail to see things from the girl's perspective: Dealing with someone who has OCD (especially a guy like him who appears to have a rather severe case) is extremely hard and exhausting, I do not blame her at all for dumping him because I can understand that sometimes the burden can simply feel as too much.

I think you misunderstood my post. I said nothing about the girl nor do I have an opinion on whether she should have stayed with him. I understand very well how hard it is to live with someone with OCD, and if people think OCD sufferers aren't aware of that you're kidding yourselves; we know, if nothing else because we hate being around ourselves and that's one of the reasons I isolated myself until I got over my OCD, because I didn't want to subject others to it (although isolating yourself makes OCD worse).

Actually, to be quite honest I think she did the right thing leaving him. When you don't want to stay, you don't do anybody any favours by staying, whether your partner has OCD or any sort of disability. My message was purely related to him, not her. Seeing somebody that is so deep into their OCD being able to do such major leaps out of their comfort zone for someone they love is nothing short of amazing.

You say "I hate that video" and "people fail to see things from the girl's perspective" but I think you're guilty of the same thing. There's nothing to hate about that video, he's talking about the girl he loves and what he's willing to do for her. You're putting yourself in her shoes, therefore failing to see things from his perspective as well. Nobody's perfect, I guess ;)

#35 Posted by TacticalDesire (10713 posts) -

I used to have some pretty decent OCD when I was a kid. I would have to do weird movements with my hands, and I have to place things a certain way, and sometimes I would have to touch things. It's not damn near as bad anymore, though I can still be fidgety occassionally, especially with the sheets on my bed (which could just be more of a preference thing). In any event imo, germaphobes and neat-freaks who claim they have OCD don't really understand what the disorder is.

#36 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

I used to have some pretty decent OCD when I was a kid. I would have to do weird movements with my hands, and I have to place things a certain way, and sometimes I would have to touch things. It's not damn near as bad anymore, though I can still be fidgety occassionally, especially with the sheets on my bed (which could just be more of a preference thing). In any event imo, germaphobes and neat-freaks who claim they have OCD don't really understand what the disorder is.

And what do you base this on? The illness is about compulsions and doubts, both germaphobes and severe neat-freaks have it too because normally those conditions don't exist in a vacuum. (I'm not talking about people who like to have a clean house, I'm talking about those people who spend their entire day in agony over leaving their chair out of place before leaving the house)

#37 Posted by indzman (16397 posts) -

Whats OCD ? Some kind of mental problem ?

#38 Edited by Korvus (2342 posts) -
#39 Posted by indzman (16397 posts) -

@korvus said:

@indzman: OCD stands for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and it's an anxiety related mental illness. Wikipedia link for convenience.

Hmmm Like what leonardo di caprio had in the movie The aviators ? i mean cleanliness freak ? I've anxiety disorder , i tend to smoke more during anxiety :(

#40 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@indzman: Best movie example I can give you is As Good as It Gets with Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt.

Examples of OCD behaviour (do note that these are several different types of OCD) would be, washing your hands non-stop every time you touch something, counting things over and over again, needing to have everything lined up just right, being afraid of stepping on sidewalk cracks, etc.

#41 Posted by indzman (16397 posts) -

@korvus said:

@indzman: Best movie example I can give you is As Good as It Gets with Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt.

Examples of OCD behaviour (do note that these are several different types of OCD) would be, washing your hands non-stop every time you touch something, counting things over and over again, needing to have everything lined up just right, being afraid of stepping on sidewalk cracks, etc.

Yeah, seen that movie. Leo is same in The Aviator. Thanks for the references Korvus, i understand OCD now :)

#42 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@indzman: No problem =) Just couldn't recall The Aviator all that well, so didn't want to give you the wrong answer XD

#43 Edited by indzman (16397 posts) -

@korvus said:

@indzman: No problem =) Just couldn't recall The Aviator all that well, so didn't want to give you the wrong answer XD

You are welcome :) Leo is same in the movie The Aviator as real life producer Howard Huges, a millonaire , a genius , a womaniser yet turns insane as he ages for OCD sysmptoms as you stated. Closes himself in a room naked for days , incase bacteria or virus from outside infects him.

#44 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@indzman: Oh yeah. Germaphobia is f'ed up...I laugh about it now but back when I had it my life was so miserable...I remember once as a teenager I locked myself in my room not to be disturbed and accidentally dropped the key on the floor and couldn't pick it up because it was on the floor so spent most of the day locked inside my own room. And that was a good day on a scale from 1 to "I want to kill myself" =P

It's so ridiculous what your mind can do to you =P

Oh, and to be noted, I mentioned As Good As it Gets but do realise Jack's character has 5 or 6 types of OCD. Most people have only 1 or 2...I wouldn't want to be like him...then again, when I did have OCD I didn't want to be like me either XD

#45 Edited by indzman (16397 posts) -

@korvus said:

@indzman: Oh yeah. Germaphobia is f'ed up...I laugh about it now but back when I had it my life was so miserable...I remember once as a teenager I locked myself in my room not to be disturbed and accidentally dropped the key on the floor and couldn't pick it up because it was on the floor so spent most of the day locked inside my own room. And that was a good day on a scale from 1 to "I want to kill myself" =P

It's so ridiculous what your mind can do to you =P

Oh, and to be noted, I mentioned As Good As it Gets but do realise Jack's character has 5 or 6 types of OCD. Most people have only 1 or 2...I wouldn't want to be like him...then again, when I did have OCD I didn't want to be like me either XD

HeHe , glad you got better . If only i can cure myself of anxiety also ( Lose sleep, starts chain smoking ETC ) i'd be happy too lol. You reminded me well, i need to see As good as its gets soon again , been ages seen that movie. Will check the movie more minutely now for jacks OCD symptoms :)

#46 Posted by Korvus (2342 posts) -

@indzman: Great, I'll tell Jack to give me my share of the profits for advertisement =P

#47 Edited by indzman (16397 posts) -

@korvus said:

@indzman: Great, I'll tell Jack to give me my share of the profits for advertisement =P

And tell Helen Hunt to 'thank me personally' for rewatching the movie , wait shes old now. Don't bother HeHe

#48 Posted by Assassin_87 (2294 posts) -

OCD is in some cases crippling and such a weird disorder. I hate when people say they're OCD because they like things clean and excessively organized. That's called not being disgusting.

#49 Posted by foxhound_fox (86840 posts) -

No. I know a lot of people who use the term very liberally and think them being organized is "obsessive compulsive" but I have not known anyone with it as a diagnosed illness.