Is it easier to get a job when you have a job?

#1 Posted by jasean79 (2398 posts) -

I've heard people tell me this over the years that it's much easier to find new work when you already have an existing job. In my experience, they're both difficult and require a lot of luck and good timing.

What do you think?

#2 Edited by Korvus (8231 posts) -

I can see how you might do better during job interviews if you're not desperate for money. Plus, having a job hopefully increases your connections in the business making it more likely that you will be contacted by someone interested in hiring you.

That being said, easier doesn't necessarily mean easy.

#3 Posted by thegerg (16107 posts) -

yes

#4 Posted by hippiesanta (9992 posts) -

It's easier to get a job if you are good looking and likeable attitude. That's the real fact.

#5 Posted by indzman (19986 posts) -

@hippiesanta said:

It's easier to get a job if you are good looking and likeable attitude. That's the real fact.

Seems you have never worked in your life =P

#6 Edited by indzman (19986 posts) -

To OP, its easier to get a job on a particular feild if you are working on that feild for another company for some time or got job experience in past. Companies looks out for people like promising freshers or people with experience already. Looks , Smartness are all secondary unless you going for sales job. Degrees, experience comes first.

#7 Edited by joehult (382 posts) -

Depends, I've received a few unsolicited offers from other companies. But anytime I've sent out resumes, the rejection rate is about the same. It is always who you know, until we get back to the late 90s unemployment rate.

#8 Posted by jasean79 (2398 posts) -

@indzman:

I agree with that. In your opinion, does a degree outweigh experience?

#9 Posted by indzman (19986 posts) -

@jasean79 said:

@indzman:

I agree with that. In your opinion, does a degree outweigh experience?

Ummm experience counts most but in todays world of competition its best to've a few good degrees also. If you are busy working in day time , you can obtain essential extra degrees ( Say MBA or SAP for example ) through correspondents or night classes :)

#10 Edited by Boddicker (3134 posts) -

Yes.

#11 Edited by thehig1 (3367 posts) -

Its not always easier, when you have a job your less motivated to find another job.

#12 Posted by Sword-Demon (7001 posts) -

Someone who works is more appealing than someone who doesn't.

If you were an employer during an interview, and you were to ask, "What have you been doing for the past few months?" would you rather hear "Working full time," or "sitting on my ass"?

plus, if you're a good worker, your supervisor should give a good recommendation if they were to ask about you. you don't have that benefit if you're not working.

#13 Posted by jasean79 (2398 posts) -

@Sword-Demon said:

Someone who works is more appealing than someone who doesn't.

If you were an employer during an interview, and you were to ask, "What have you been doing for the past few months?" would you rather hear "Working full time," or "sitting on my ass"?

plus, if you're a good worker, your supervisor should give a good recommendation if they were to ask about you. you don't have that benefit if you're not working.

I don't entirely agree with this. I'm currently unemployed (hence the question), but I don't "sit on my ass" all day waiting for work to come to me. I've been applying like a mad man since I lost my job a couple of months ago. I've had a few interviews here and there, sure, but I think the bunch that actually reap the system for UE benefits give a bad rep for those of us who want to work. We're not all lazy bastards!

#14 Posted by magicalclick (23987 posts) -

Yes, it is like credit card. When you have one, everyone wants to give you one. When you don't, no one cares about you.

#15 Edited by THE_DRUGGIE (24989 posts) -

You just gotta play the nepotism game right!

#16 Posted by ferrari2001 (17325 posts) -

It definitely helps if you are currently employed and have work experience. It's also very helpful if you know someone in the industry that you are trying to enter. Who you know and how you know them is in fact important for getting a job. Experience is key though. If you have experience you are most likely to get the job.

#17 Edited by one_plum (6364 posts) -

@jasean79 said:

@Sword-Demon said:

Someone who works is more appealing than someone who doesn't.

If you were an employer during an interview, and you were to ask, "What have you been doing for the past few months?" would you rather hear "Working full time," or "sitting on my ass"?

plus, if you're a good worker, your supervisor should give a good recommendation if they were to ask about you. you don't have that benefit if you're not working.

I don't entirely agree with this. I'm currently unemployed (hence the question), but I don't "sit on my ass" all day waiting for work to come to me. I've been applying like a mad man since I lost my job a couple of months ago. I've had a few interviews here and there, sure, but I think the bunch that actually reap the system for UE benefits give a bad rep for those of us who want to work. We're not all lazy bastards!

If you're busy with volunteer work at the moment, you can put more emphasis on your volunteering experience.

#18 Posted by BluRayHiDef (10839 posts) -

it's interesting that you made this thread today, because I got fired from my job yesterday. I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day. I'm now waiting for the agency to call me back with another position. Hopefully everything turns out well. As a backup, I filed for unemployment benefits and can make my first claim next week; thank goodness for that.

#19 Posted by airshocker (31014 posts) -

Yes. It's a sad fact that most employers won't hire you unless you've already had experience from a similar job.

#20 Posted by airshocker (31014 posts) -
@hippiesanta said:

It's easier to get a job if you are good looking and likeable attitude. That's the real fact.

You're shit out of luck, then.

#21 Posted by Serraph105 (28571 posts) -

In my experience yes, when I have a job it's much easier to get interviews for more jobs. If I'm out of a job it's most likely going to take me a while to land a job or even get an interview. I feel lucky to have never become one of the long term unemployed people.

#22 Posted by plageus900 (1303 posts) -

@BluRayHiDef said:

it's interesting that you made this thread today, because I got fired from my job yesterday. I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day. I'm now waiting for the agency to call me back with another position. Hopefully everything turns out well. As a backup, I filed for unemployment benefits and can make my first claim next week; thank goodness for that.

Why were you fired?

#23 Edited by BluRayHiDef (10839 posts) -

@plageus900 said:

@BluRayHiDef said:

it's interesting that you made this thread today, because I got fired from my job yesterday. I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day. I'm now waiting for the agency to call me back with another position. Hopefully everything turns out well. As a backup, I filed for unemployment benefits and can make my first claim next week; thank goodness for that.

Why were you fired?

An accumulation of complaints made about me over the course of the past few months, which include the following:

1. During inventory season, a fellow employee threw two rolls of fabric into my face; I chased him through the warehouse but never caught him. A few days later, he said something that angered me, so I shoved a chair into him; a manager saw me do this, but I never reported the aforementioned incident nor did anyone witness it. Hence, it seemed as if I did it without reason.

2. During my first week there, an employee cursed me out without reason as I was walking by him; I looked at him for a second and then kept walking. Ever since that incident, he would mean-mugg me and scoff at me whenever I'd walk by. One day, after he scoffed at me yet again, I became so angry that I gave him the middle finger. I was reported for that.

3. A few days ago, I accidentally bumped a cart full of rolls of fabric into a fellow employee's desk. He reported it and the boss interpreted it as the final straw.

I'm at fault for retaliating, but I should have reported the incidents which caused me to retaliate in the first place. These incidents, without my perspective being understood, painted me as a trouble maker. Having said that, I'm not that bummed about it; I honestly hated the job and was miserable while there.

Please spare me of any criticism in regard to me supposedly being immature; there's only so much a person can take when they're being attacked from all sides. I'm the type of person that people look at and immediately dislike. No, I'm not being paranoid and bullshitting. Accept it or don't.

#24 Posted by themajormayor (24334 posts) -

Obviously.

#25 Posted by foxhound_fox (90891 posts) -

Considering a lot of employers look at job history as a major factor in determining who they hire I'd say yes.

@BluRayHiDef said:

I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day.

Boo hoo. I just worked a 13 hour day today, driving close to 1100km, and still had energy to come home and clean. If you are getting paid for every one of those hours, then there should be no reason to complain. Work is work and there are tons of people who would kill for any job, regardless of what it would take to get it.

Also, temper temper. Should pick up a couple hoodrats and blow off some steam.

#26 Edited by BluRayHiDef (10839 posts) -

@foxhound_fox said:

Considering a lot of employers look at job history as a major factor in determining who they hire I'd say yes.

@BluRayHiDef said:

I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day.

Boo hoo. I just worked a 13 hour day today, driving close to 1100km, and still had energy to come home and clean. If you are getting paid for every one of those hours, then there should be no reason to complain. Work is work and there are tons of people who would kill for any job, regardless of what it would take to get it.

Also, temper temper. Should pick up a couple hoodrats and blow off some steam.

Sorry, son. I'm not one of those people who lives to work. I'f I worked a twelve hour shift, I wouldn't get home until about 9:15 PM, which would leave me with only one hour to cook my breakfast and lunch for the following day. Also, I'd have no time to enjoy any part of my day (i.e. no video games, no working on my YouTube channels, etc). I don't want to be stuck with a schedule like that. If it works for you, that's great. However, I know it won't work for me; what's the point of making a living if you don't have enough time to live (i.e. enjoy life)?

#27 Edited by -Blasphemy- (3273 posts) -

@hippiesanta said:

It's easier to get a job if you are good looking and likeable attitude. That's the real fact.

so true. used to work with this girl, most loveable person ever and she would get job offers like everyday.

#28 Posted by Larchey (11 posts) -

Having spent about 4 years unemployed and getting no where, to then find employment and get a new job within a couple of weeks applying for one really does make me want to agree with this.

But, part of me is inclined to believe it's because 3 or the 4 years of my unemployment I was in college studying health and social care, and the second job I applied for is for private care work. That, and I currently work for Dominos and the businesses are about 45 miles apart, so I don't see those having much business interaction past "I'd like a pizza please".

Having a job already though gives you security if you don't get the one you are applying for. You aren't completely ballsed over if you don't get it, so you don't necessarily have to put all your hopes onto an interview.

#29 Edited by IMAHAPYHIPPO (2733 posts) -

People out looking to "get" a job won't get jobs. The people who get jobs are the ones who go out and take them. Sending in a resume seems to be the end point of most people's job pursuit, and that's exactly why many people don't even get a courtesy call. The people get jobs are the ones who walk into the building, ask to speak to the manager, shake his or her hand and say, "I'd like to set up an interview. How can we make that happen?" Those are the people who get jobs. The people who go the extra mile to get hired. It's not easier or harder based on whether you're currently employed, so long as you have a legitimate reason for the gap in your employment history.

#30 Edited by foxhound_fox (90891 posts) -

@BluRayHiDef said:

Sorry, son. I'm not one of those people who lives to work. I'f I worked a twelve hour shift, I wouldn't get home until about 9:15 PM, which would leave me with only one hour to cook my breakfast and lunch for the following day. Also, I'd have no time to enjoy any part of my day (i.e. no video games, no working on my YouTube channels, etc). I don't want to be stuck with a schedule like that. If it works for you, that's great. However, I know it won't work for me; what's the point of making a living if you don't have enough time to live (i.e. enjoy life)?

And? How are you going to pay the bills? If it's a temp job, might as well do it until you can find something more suitable.

Like I said already, people would kill for a job where they worked only 12 hours and got paid for all of them. Some people in the US work three full time jobs just to make it to the poverty line.

#31 Posted by Serraph105 (28571 posts) -

@BluRayHiDef said:

it's interesting that you made this thread today, because I got fired from my job yesterday. I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day. I'm now waiting for the agency to call me back with another position. Hopefully everything turns out well. As a backup, I filed for unemployment benefits and can make my first claim next week; thank goodness for that.

Sorry to hear that dude, and yeah 12 hour days would be a bitch. I'm honestly not sure how you would be able to search for other positions while on a job like that. Temp jobs are a good idea though while looking for full time work, and it's okay to turn down the ones that don't work for you. Just be sure to thank them for the opportunity.

#32 Posted by Serraph105 (28571 posts) -

@IMAHAPYHIPPO said:

People out looking to "get" a job won't get jobs. The people who get jobs are the ones who go out and take them. Sending in a resume seems to be the end point of most people's job pursuit, and that's exactly why many people don't even get a courtesy call. The people get jobs are the ones who walk into the building, ask to speak to the manager, shake his or her hand and say, "I'd like to set up an interview. How can we make that happen?" Those are the people who get jobs. The people who go the extra mile to get hired. It's not easier or harder based on whether you're currently employed, so long as you have a legitimate reason for the gap in your employment history.

I get the sense that this only applies to certain area's of work. For things like retail, the food industry, places where the manager works out on the floor, etc this makes sense. Generally for the IT field (my field) you really have no chance of meeting a manager, not to mention with more and more people putting their jobs up online they expect you to use apply that way so they don't have to deal with everyone knocking on their door.

#33 Edited by hippiesanta (9992 posts) -

@indzman said:

@hippiesanta said:

It's easier to get a job if you are good looking and likeable attitude. That's the real fact.

Seems you have never worked in your life =P

I went for a job interview (my first job ever at the age of 22) with bunch of hundred applicants .... and one of the most important requirement other than education and personality is your physical appearence. I go through every phase easily without trying to hard ... unlike some other guys who are older and think they are good looking (which is not) and have many working experience lol. and during courses ..... my instuctor explain to everyone of us who made the cut .... that "sex sales" no matter if you like it or not.

@airshocker said:

You're shit out of luck, then.

lol

@-Blasphemy- said:

so true. used to work with this girl, most loveable person ever and she would get job offers like everyday.

glad to know

#34 Posted by IMAHAPYHIPPO (2733 posts) -

@Serraph105 said:

@IMAHAPYHIPPO said:

People out looking to "get" a job won't get jobs. The people who get jobs are the ones who go out and take them. Sending in a resume seems to be the end point of most people's job pursuit, and that's exactly why many people don't even get a courtesy call. The people get jobs are the ones who walk into the building, ask to speak to the manager, shake his or her hand and say, "I'd like to set up an interview. How can we make that happen?" Those are the people who get jobs. The people who go the extra mile to get hired. It's not easier or harder based on whether you're currently employed, so long as you have a legitimate reason for the gap in your employment history.

I get the sense that this only applies to certain area's of work. For things like retail, the food industry, places where the manager works out on the floor, etc this makes sense. Generally for the IT field (my field) you really have no chance of meeting a manager, not to mention with more and more people putting their jobs up online they expect you to use apply that way so they don't have to deal with everyone knocking on their door.

As far as just walking in and asking, yes, but at the same time, I'd imagine in a field like IT, calling up the office and asking to set up an interview would get you a little more mileage than simply sending in a resume and waiting it out.

#35 Edited by lamprey263 (25647 posts) -

lots of factors for hiring preference, ones like your appearance, how you dress for your interview and whether you're good looking have weight, your previous work, maybe your age and sex and race as well, hell even the layout of your resume, timing might also be key, your name may even provoke prejudicial reactions from human resources, they may look at your credit, they may look you up on social network sites by name or the email you provide them, they may put more weight on your cover letter before looking at your qualifications

and hell, if there aren't even enough hurdles they may just hire someone who's a friend or family someone who works there

#36 Posted by jasean79 (2398 posts) -

@IMAHAPYHIPPO:

I agree with what you're saying. The success rate of finding a job purely on just sending in resumes via online job boards is like 5%. The biggest impact on landing a job is "networking" - finding first the type of place you'd like to work and then talking to friends, prior coworkers, family, etc. to get your name out there and hopefully find a company that someone can vouch for you. Employers are much more eager to hire someone that comes recommended than someone who they don't know.

The problem I'm facing is, "What do I want to do?" I have over 15 years working in the insurance industry and while I've become good at it and pretty much did well myself, I just don't know if this is something I really want to continue on with. The bigger problem then is lack of experience to up and change career fields. I jumped right into the working force out of high school in the 90's because I never had the money (or desire at the time) to attend college. Sure, people say I can go back to school now, but there's other risks associated with that too. School costs money. Assuming I were to find a job, at what I'm banking on will be a pay cut most likely, how will I continue to pay for school and my mortgage, car payment, etc. at the same time? My wife only works PT and we're barely making ends meet as it is with unemployment now. I'm between a rock and a hard place and I don't know what to do.

In all my years of working, I've never had to collect. The way the job market is now is a lot different than it was 20 years ago. It's tough finding work in any field, unless you don't mind taking those shit customer service jobs for $10/hr (which wouldn't be enough to cover my monthly expenses anyway). I empathize with people that are out of work or underemployed. It's not easy trying to make it. But, that doesn't stop me from trying. Like I said before, I think it's a lot of luck and good timing. I'm staying positive about the whole thing and I know I'll get back on my feet soon. It's just the waiting in limbo part that's killing me now.

#37 Posted by Korvus (8231 posts) -

@jasean79: Yeah, you're in a tough spot. I worked as a programmer/web developer/IT guy for over 10 years; between college, Microsoft courses and all that I had about 20 diplomas when I decided I really hated what I did, but the more I worked, the more courses I'd take and the more diplomas I'd get, so it got harder and harder to quit...at a point (and since I was on my own so no "have to take care of family" issue...my car was payed for, my rent was low, etc) I decided to study physical therapy.

After I finished it, my resume was pretty much worthless, since I was 26yo and with no previous experience in the area I wanted to get a job in. Eventually I managed to get a job in a PT clinic but about 2 years in I moved to a different country and back to the same situation...they couldn't care less here what job experience I had in a different country...

Now I ended up opening my own business and making due with that, although it's hard to keep regular clients in this area; you fix them, they're gone, so right now I have a lot of things to deal with but in about a month or so I'll start trying to find a job in the area, and will have to hope having my own business counts as "job experience" to them =)

I hope you figure it out and all goes well for you =)

#38 Posted by jasean79 (2398 posts) -

@korvus:

Thanks, I appreciate it. And good luck to you as well!

A little adage I like to live by: "Those who try at something and fail are infinitely better than those who do nothing and succeed."

#39 Edited by indzman (19986 posts) -

@BluRayHiDef said:

@plageus900 said:

@BluRayHiDef said:

it's interesting that you made this thread today, because I got fired from my job yesterday. I immediately called a temp agency, which was able to get a new job for me, but I turned it down because it required working twelve hours per day. I'm now waiting for the agency to call me back with another position. Hopefully everything turns out well. As a backup, I filed for unemployment benefits and can make my first claim next week; thank goodness for that.

Why were you fired?

An accumulation of complaints made about me over the course of the past few months, which include the following:

1. During inventory season, a fellow employee threw two rolls of fabric into my face; I chased him through the warehouse but never caught him. A few days later, he said something that angered me, so I shoved a chair into him; a manager saw me do this, but I never reported the aforementioned incident nor did anyone witness it. Hence, it seemed as if I did it without reason.

2. During my first week there, an employee cursed me out without reason as I was walking by him; I looked at him for a second and then kept walking. Ever since that incident, he would mean-mugg me and scoff at me whenever I'd walk by. One day, after he scoffed at me yet again, I became so angry that I gave him the middle finger. I was reported for that.

3. A few days ago, I accidentally bumped a cart full of rolls of fabric into a fellow employee's desk. He reported it and the boss interpreted it as the final straw.

I'm at fault for retaliating, but I should have reported the incidents which caused me to retaliate in the first place. These incidents, without my perspective being understood, painted me as a trouble maker. Having said that, I'm not that bummed about it; I honestly hated the job and was miserable while there.

Please spare me of any criticism in regard to me supposedly being immature; there's only so much a person can take when they're being attacked from all sides. I'm the type of person that people look at and immediately dislike. No, I'm not being paranoid and bullshitting. Accept it or don't.

In workplace you should take all negetivity towards you or office politics with a pinch of salt. Ignore and endure.

#40 Posted by Korvus (8231 posts) -

@jasean79: I do believe that half of what you accomplish in life is due to attitude, and you seem to have the right one so I'm sure you'll eventually end up where you want to be =D

#41 Posted by shellcase86 (2077 posts) -

Yes, it's easier to land a job when you have one versus those who are jobless. Employers are adverse to hiring the jobless, facts.

#42 Posted by Cyberdot (3925 posts) -

Yes.

Employers would prefer to hire working people.