Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) 4 months, 9 days ago

Poll: Hot of mild (14 votes)

Hot 71%
Mild 21%

For those that eat Chips and salsa, do you like it hot or mild?

What chip and what salsa do you normally eat?

I normally eat these chips

They have enough salt to taste good by themselves.

And this is the salsa I normally eat. Has a great taste with enough heat to make me happy.

#1 Edited by Master_Live (14860 posts) -

I prefer these:

I like my nacho cheese hot.

#2 Edited by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@Master_Live said:

I prefer these:

I like my nacho cheese hot.

Which nacho cheese do you use? I have a hard time ever finding a hot nacho cheese dip.

#3 Edited by Master_Live (14860 posts) -

Wooops, I guess I like it mild:

I thought somehow you were asking whether people liked their dip actually hot or with a more tepid temperature.

#4 Edited by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@Master_Live said:

Wooops, I guess I like it mild:

I thought somehow you were asking whether people liked their dip actually hot or with a more tepid temperature.

HAHA...Oh.

#5 Edited by BranKetra (48785 posts) -

Chips and hummus are healthier and they taste better. If salsa is the only choice, hot is chosen.

#6 Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@BranKetra said:

Chips and hummus are healthier and they taste better. If salsa is the only choice, hot is chosen.

Wouldn't that really depend on the ingredients in the salsa? I have never even seen hummus in the store here, let alone tasted it. I just looked it up and it sounds good based off the ingredients. I will try to remember to actively look for it this week when I shop.

#7 Posted by solidruss (23752 posts) -

@BranKetra said:

Chips and hummus are healthier and they taste better. If salsa is the only choice, hot is chosen.

I would agree with this as well. I love me some hummus! Especially when it's freshly made!

#8 Edited by BranKetra (48785 posts) -

@AmazonTreeBoa said:

@BranKetra said:

Chips and hummus are healthier and they taste better. If salsa is the only choice, hot is chosen.

Wouldn't that really depend on the ingredients in the salsa? I have never even seen hummus in the store here, let alone tasted it. I just looked it up and it sounds good based off the ingredients. I will try to remember to actively look for it this week when I shop.

Sure. Homemade pico de gallo is in some ways healthier than store-purchased hummus especially for men since tomato is an ingredient, but I was referring to canned and bottled salsas similar to the canned cheese dip posted in this thread before I first entered it and likely the salsa you posted a picture of. Hummus is primarily chickpeas. I occasionally get roasted red pepper hummus from Target, if any kind, yet I would recommend normal hummus as well.

#9 Posted by playmynutz (6076 posts) -

Tortilla chips and ceviche what chu kno

#10 Posted by BranKetra (48785 posts) -

@solidruss said:

@BranKetra said:

Chips and hummus are healthier and they taste better. If salsa is the only choice, hot is chosen.

I would agree with this as well. I love me some hummus! Especially when it's freshly made!

*Brofist*

#11 Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

Lol wow I just noticed the title. I clearly did something wrong as well as the "of" instead of "or" typo. The title should of been "Chips N Salsa". Sadly I can't fix the title at this point.

#12 Posted by BranKetra (48785 posts) -

For some reason, I am unable to edit it, either.

#13 Edited by lamprey263 (24236 posts) -

I'm a fan of taking hot to its limits... but, there's a lot of things in such pursuits that ruin what I aim for. One thing is that the hottest sauces can achieve hot easy but lack the ability to find a way to make it flavorful. I personally like anything that can make good use of habaneros or ghost peppers. I'm growing my own ghost peppers now and recently had someone make some salsa from just one pepper and it was pretty darn good, and that was just one mature ghost pepper, I got like a dozen full grown peppers waiting to mature and another dozen more just fruiting on one plant. I'm pretty satisfied with it. I now wanna go out an get another plus two habanero plants, so I can regularly make salsa from them.

#14 Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@lamprey263 said:

I'm a fan of taking hot to its limits... but, there's a lot of things in such pursuits that ruin what I aim for. One thing is that the hottest sauces can achieve hot easy but lack the ability to find a way to make it flavorful. I personally like anything that can make good use of habaneros or ghost peppers. I'm growing my own ghost peppers now and recently had someone make some salsa from just one pepper and it was pretty darn good, and that was just one mature ghost pepper, I got like a dozen full grown peppers waiting to mature and another dozen more just fruiting on one plant. I'm pretty satisfied with it. I now wanna go out an get another plus two habanero plants, so I can regularly make salsa from them.

I am growing orange sweet bell peppers, black hungarian peppers, yellow cayenne pepper, and red habanero pepper. Next year I plan on adding Bhut Jolokia to the menu. Might also add Trinidad Scorpion too.

#15 Posted by lamprey263 (24236 posts) -

@AmazonTreeBoa said:

@lamprey263 said:

I'm a fan of taking hot to its limits... but, there's a lot of things in such pursuits that ruin what I aim for. One thing is that the hottest sauces can achieve hot easy but lack the ability to find a way to make it flavorful. I personally like anything that can make good use of habaneros or ghost peppers. I'm growing my own ghost peppers now and recently had someone make some salsa from just one pepper and it was pretty darn good, and that was just one mature ghost pepper, I got like a dozen full grown peppers waiting to mature and another dozen more just fruiting on one plant. I'm pretty satisfied with it. I now wanna go out an get another plus two habanero plants, so I can regularly make salsa from them.

I am growing orange sweet bell peppers, black hungarian peppers, yellow cayenne pepper, and red habanero pepper. Next year I plan on adding Bhut Jolokia to the menu. Might also add Trinidad Scorpion too.

Cool. You make me want to get a wider diversity of peppers going. Hmmm, Trinidad Scorpion, never heard of it (or I have but forgot about it), just Google'd it and sounds like my cup of tea, said to be hotter than the Bhut Jolokia. Unfortunately I don't think plant nurseries in my area carry them. There's a website I found while Google'ing is said to sell a variety of really hot ones of all types of colors and was derived form Trinidad related to the Trinidad Scorpion, which they sell by it's name of the "7 Pot Pepper". They even sell seeds for a variety known as the "Carolina Reaper" that made the last record for world's hottest pepper. The Habanero, Trinidad Scorpion, the 7-Pot, Bhut Jolokia, and the Carolina Reaper, among another, all actually all varieties of Capsicum chinense. Anyhow, check out the links above, they sell seeds, which sounds like the route I might have to go for some of the more hardcore stuff. Checked some videos out and they can get a decent sized starter plant going in about three months months from seeds. In the meantime I'll get some Habanero Peppers because I know the nurseries here have those, maybe some Wax Peppers and Thai Peppers or whatever else they might have left.

#16 Edited by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@lamprey263 said:

@AmazonTreeBoa said:

@lamprey263 said:

I'm a fan of taking hot to its limits... but, there's a lot of things in such pursuits that ruin what I aim for. One thing is that the hottest sauces can achieve hot easy but lack the ability to find a way to make it flavorful. I personally like anything that can make good use of habaneros or ghost peppers. I'm growing my own ghost peppers now and recently had someone make some salsa from just one pepper and it was pretty darn good, and that was just one mature ghost pepper, I got like a dozen full grown peppers waiting to mature and another dozen more just fruiting on one plant. I'm pretty satisfied with it. I now wanna go out an get another plus two habanero plants, so I can regularly make salsa from them.

I am growing orange sweet bell peppers, black hungarian peppers, yellow cayenne pepper, and red habanero pepper. Next year I plan on adding Bhut Jolokia to the menu. Might also add Trinidad Scorpion too.

Cool. You make me want to get a wider diversity of peppers going. Hmmm, Trinidad Scorpion, never heard of it (or I have but forgot about it), just Google'd it and sounds like my cup of tea, said to be hotter than the Bhut Jolokia. Unfortunately I don't think plant nurseries in my area carry them. There's a website I found while Google'ing is said to sell a variety of really hot ones of all types of colors and was derived form Trinidad related to the Trinidad Scorpion, which they sell by it's name of the "7 Pot Pepper". They even sell seeds for a variety known as the "Carolina Reaper" that made the last record for world's hottest pepper. The Habanero, Trinidad Scorpion, the 7-Pot, Bhut Jolokia, and the Carolina Reaper, among another, all actually all varieties of Capsicum chinense. Anyhow, check out the links above, they sell seeds, which sounds like the route I might have to go for some of the more hardcore stuff. Checked some videos out and they can get a decent sized starter plant going in about three months months from seeds. In the meantime I'll get some Habanero Peppers because I know the nurseries here have those, maybe some Wax Peppers and Thai Peppers or whatever else they might have left.

The Carolina Reaper is the hottest pepper on record, but not the actual hottest pepper. The Chocolate Bhutlah is one that is hotter for example.

#17 Posted by lamprey263 (24236 posts) -

@AmazonTreeBoa:

Pretty cool. Too bad they don't have seeds for sale for it though, but I'll keep my eye open in case they stabilize it. Good thing I've no plans to eat them straight like these guys did, I don't really feel like puking my guts out like these guys. Anyhow, this summer has been the only time I've grown peppers, and my plant has matured quite a bit. Do you know if they'll keep growing year round, or will they only produce in the warmer seasons?

I'm reading up on planting seeds and I hear you need between 2 and 3 months between growing from seeds and transplanting and from what I read this usually starts just after the cold season peaks. Anyhow, that's for planting new stuff, I was just wondering if my current mature plant will keep producing peppers year round, do you know from your experience with peppers? It's usually mild here in winters, usually averaging between mid 60s and 50s, but sometimes peaking in the 70s, if that helps making any determination.

#18 Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16745 posts) -

@lamprey263 said:

@AmazonTreeBoa:

Pretty cool. Too bad they don't have seeds for sale for it though, but I'll keep my eye open in case they stabilize it. Good thing I've no plans to eat them straight like these guys did, I don't really feel like puking my guts out like these guys. Anyhow, this summer has been the only time I've grown peppers, and my plant has matured quite a bit. Do you know if they'll keep growing year round, or will they only produce in the warmer seasons?

I'm reading up on planting seeds and I hear you need between 2 and 3 months between growing from seeds and transplanting and from what I read this usually starts just after the cold season peaks. Anyhow, that's for planting new stuff, I was just wondering if my current mature plant will keep producing peppers year round, do you know from your experience with peppers? It's usually mild here in winters, usually averaging between mid 60s and 50s, but sometimes peaking in the 70s, if that helps making any determination.

No they don't grow all year around unless you live some place that is warm all year long. You can put them in pots and over winter them indoors. I started my seeds indoors about two months before putting them outside. If you take it inside during the winter, you can have a pepper plant that looks like this...

Yeah I know, huge right. I have one of each one of my peppers in a pot to over winter this winter to see how well I can do.