Doing 40 LB dumbbells is equivalent to how much in terms of bench press?

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#1 Posted by dasupergoat777 (6 posts) -
Am just wondering, doing 40 LB dumbbells is equivalent to about how much weight in terms of bench press. I assume 80 pounds right?
#2 Posted by dagreenfish (1817 posts) -

A pound is a pound whether it's attached or not.

#3 Posted by wstfld (6376 posts) -
Its easier to bench a bar than the dumbbells.
#4 Posted by coolbeans90 (21305 posts) -

Its easier to bench a bar than the dumbbells. wstfld

Basically this. Not exactly sure that there is an exact numerical ratio of difficulty per pound though.

#5 Posted by Optical_Order (5100 posts) -

40 lb dumbells for flatbench press?

You can probably bench about 100 lbs.

#6 Posted by dagreenfish (1817 posts) -

[QUOTE="wstfld"]Its easier to bench a bar than the dumbbells. coolbeans90

Basically this. Not exactly sure that there is an exact numerical ratio of difficulty per pound though.

This isn't really true (not really wrong either). It depends on your technique and whether one side is stronger than the other.

#7 Posted by Ultimas_Blade (3671 posts) -

I thought 40lbs dumbbellswould translate to 120-140lbs??

#8 Posted by coolbeans90 (21305 posts) -

[QUOTE="coolbeans90"]

[QUOTE="wstfld"]Its easier to bench a bar than the dumbbells. dagreenfish

Basically this. Not exactly sure that there is an exact numerical ratio of difficulty per pound though.

This isn't really true (not really wrong either). It depends on your technique and whether one side is stronger than the other.

Actually, it is. Balance is practically done for you with a bar. Same can't be said for dumbells.

#9 Posted by dagreenfish (1817 posts) -

[QUOTE="dagreenfish"]

[QUOTE="coolbeans90"]

Basically this. Not exactly sure that there is an exact numerical ratio of difficulty per pound though.

coolbeans90

This isn't really true (not really wrong either). It depends on your technique and whether one side is stronger than the other.

Actually, it is. Balance is practically done for you with a bar. Same can't be said for dumbells.

I'm aware of this. But I still think it depends on your technique and balance. I rep 155lbs 4x12 on a bar. I can also do the same sets with 75lb dumbells. Yes there is a slight difference, but for most people it's not really going to be huge.

#10 Posted by coolbeans90 (21305 posts) -

[QUOTE="coolbeans90"]

[QUOTE="dagreenfish"]

This isn't really true (not really wrong either). It depends on your technique and whether one side is stronger than the other.

dagreenfish

Actually, it is. Balance is practically done for you with a bar. Same can't be said for dumbells.

I'm aware of this. But I still think it depends on your technique and balance. I rep 155lbs 4x12 on a bar. I can also do the same sets with 75lb dumbells. Yes there is a slight difference, but for most people it's not really going to be huge.

Yeah, it is a difference, but not as large as I would expect even for well developed technique. How hard are you pushing yourself with these sets? Do you feel a difference in difficulty with one over the other? I would imagine that your max bench would be well over double either of your individual arms.

#11 Posted by dagreenfish (1817 posts) -

[QUOTE="dagreenfish"]

[QUOTE="coolbeans90"]

[QUOTE="dagreenfish"]

coolbeans90

I'm aware of this. But I still think it depends on your technique and balance. I rep 155lbs 4x12 on a bar. I can also do the same sets with 75lb dumbells. Yes there is a slight difference, but for most people it's not really going to be huge.

Yeah, it is a difference, but not as large as I would expect even for well developed technique. How hard are you pushing yourself with these sets? Do you feel a difference in difficulty with one over the other? I would imagine that your max bench would be well over double either of your individual arms.

These are basically upper body burnout days. Honestly Dumbells tend to be more difficult because i usually go with more of a "fly" motion to get angles that a bar doesn't get. But that's kinda the point: people need to switch up exercises to get the most gains.

#12 Posted by coolbeans90 (21305 posts) -

[QUOTE="coolbeans90"]

[QUOTE="dagreenfish"]

I'm aware of this. But I still think it depends on your technique and balance. I rep 155lbs 4x12 on a bar. I can also do the same sets with 75lb dumbells. Yes there is a slight difference, but for most people it's not really going to be huge.

dagreenfish

Yeah, it is a difference, but not as large as I would expect even for well developed technique. How hard are you pushing yourself with these sets? Do you feel a difference in difficulty with one over the other? I would imagine that your max bench would be well over double either of your individual arms.

These are basically upper body burnout days. Honestly Dumbells tend to be more difficult because i usually go with more of a "fly" motion to get angles that a bar doesn't get. But that's kinda the point: people need to switch up exercises to get the most gains.

I agree entirely with the switching up.

#13 Posted by Human-after-all (2968 posts) -

Uh. Dumbbells aren't "harder" in terms of lb for lb weight. They are harder because you fatigue faster expending more energy setting the weights up, keeping the weight stabilized and balanced (more so when new to em). You can get used to it definitely but if you are newbie it won't be the weight that is the problem, its finishing your reps. Just do it for a week or 2 and you should be fine. Gains on dumbbells are superior to bars.

It's worse if you don't have a spotter because then you expend energy getting the weights just into position and then you end up doing less reps. But you aren't doing too heavy of weight it seems so shouldn't be much of an issue for awhile.

#14 Posted by ExoticAnimal (39796 posts) -

They don't equate to anything. It just depends on how strong your chest is and how strong your biceps are. I can bench over 200 but only do about 55 max on biceps but I've seen some people bench a little over 100 and do 50 on dumbells. It really varies with everyone.

#15 Posted by VisigothSaxon (3789 posts) -

You will do a lot more weight in bench press than dumbbell press.

#16 Posted by Human-after-all (2968 posts) -

They don't equate to anything. It just depends on how strong your chest is and how strong your biceps are. I can bench over 200 but only do about 55 max on biceps but I've seen some people bench a little over 100 and do 50 on dumbells. It really varies with everyone.

ExoticAnimal
I don't recall a bench being associated much with bicep It's tricep, delts and chest ...very little bicep (only long head) but not much at all.. I bet your tricep and delts are a stronger than a guy who can bench 100...or else you are doing something wrong, no offense.
#17 Posted by Frenzyd109 (2276 posts) -
Put some weight on a barbell and find out yourself.
#18 Posted by ExoticAnimal (39796 posts) -

[QUOTE="ExoticAnimal"]

They don't equate to anything. It just depends on how strong your chest is and how strong your biceps are. I can bench over 200 but only do about 55 max on biceps but I've seen some people bench a little over 100 and do 50 on dumbells. It really varies with everyone.

Human-after-all

I don't recall a bench being associated much with bicep It's tricep, delts and chest ...very little bicep (only long head) but not much at all.. I bet your tricep and delts are a stronger than a guy who can bench 100...or else you are doing something wrong, no offense.

I didn't say they were associated at all. :? My post may not have been clear but I kinda gave examples that disproved how they relate to one another.

#19 Posted by UT_Wrestler (16378 posts) -
I'd say the ratio is about 80%, in other words you can dumbbell press about 80% of the weight you can bench press. A person who can dumbbell press 80 lbs should be able to bench about 100.
#20 Posted by BigSexy63 (415 posts) -
I rep 245 on bench and rep 90 in each hand for dumbbell bench.
#21 Posted by rawsavon (40002 posts) -

A pound is a pound whether it's attached or not.

dagreenfish
...no, it's not. At least not as far as muscle growth and development. Dumbbells are much more difficult to lift (lack the bar to stabilize the weight and you can go lower). From my experience, I think a good 'rule' is that you just take the bar out of the equation...45lbs dumbbells = 45 lbs on each side of the bench...but that is nothing scientific...just how it 'feels' when I lift.