Differences between a GED and a high school diploma?

This topic is locked from further discussion.

#1 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

I was at a friend's house last night and GED was a topic. Personally I always viewed them as being the same and I pretty much didn't put to much stock in it. But I just did a quick google research and it seem people/employers may have a negative view on a person with a GED. So I'm curious to see other's people thoughts on it.

#2 Posted by Brain_Duster (403 posts) -

Someone with a GED is technically not what we call a "human".

#3 Posted by -ParaNormaN- (794 posts) -

It's the same thing when it comes to educational standards but a high school diploma makes you looks better. I've heard teachers and other people talk about it a lot and what I remember out of it all is that a HSD is higher quality than a GED even though it's ultimately the same thing. The order for the 3 education levels for high school is the HSD, Certificate of Completion, and the GED.

#4 Edited by LexLas (4237 posts) -

If anyone tries to prove otherwise they will fail. A GED allows you to continue to through college, at a level of a normal high school student. It will also have the exact benefits any where else, especially employment.

#5 Posted by ad1x2 (5562 posts) -

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

#6 Edited by Fightingfan (38011 posts) -

@ad1x2 said:

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

I believe to join the military with a GED you're REQUIRED to have a minimum of 15 college credits (Might vary depending on faction/branch).

Even with 15 college credit you're education is equivalent to a high school kid, according to uncle sam.

Regarding the thread; most jobs won't look at your GED/High school diploma if your education/skills exceed a GED/high school diploma.

"College jobs" probably don't even care.

#7 Posted by Fightingfan (38011 posts) -

@LexLas said:

If anyone tries to prove otherwise they will fail. A GED allows you to continue to through college, at a level of a normal high school student. It will also have the exact benefits any where else, especially employment.

GED is stigmatized with laziness. It's not the same thing as a high school diploma - socially speaking.

#8 Edited by ad1x2 (5562 posts) -

@ad1x2 said:

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

I believe to join the military with a GED you're REQUIRED to have a minimum of 15 college credits (Might vary depending on faction/branch).

Even with 15 college credit you're education is equivalent to a high school kid, according to uncle sam.

Regarding the thread; most jobs won't look at your GED/High school diploma if your education/skills exceed a GED/high school diploma.

"College jobs" probably don't even care.

The 15 semester hour requirement (some people get confused since if you just say credits they may come up to you with 15 clock hours or something similar that isn't the same) isn't required all of the time. It depends on the needs of the military; each branch is authorized a certain percentage of GED holders without the credit. The Army, for example took GEDs for almost a year straight in 2011 while not taking any at all the previous year.

In terms of accessions of total troops for each fiscal year, the Air Force is allowed one percent of them to be made of GED holders and the Army is allowed ten percent. The branch is free to take less than what they are allowed, which is frequently happening right now with the drawdown in place.

As for the military considering your education the same as a kid in high school, that isn't entirely true. According to studies the military did a person with a "Tier 2" education (Tier 1 is a high school diploma/high school senior on track to graduate or better, Tier 2 is a GED or high school certificate of completion, and Tier 3 is a dropout with nothing at all) is more likely to get discharged before completing their enlistment. As a result they are granted less slots. The 15 semester hours simply elevate the GED into Tier 1 status.

It's not like having college automatically gives you extra authority in the military anyway. A 20-year old sergeant with a GED will outrank a 28-year old specialist with a bachelor's degree any day of the week. Of course, the specialist can always apply for OCS if they are eligible to attend and be an officer.

#9 Edited by Serraph105 (27944 posts) -

@LexLas
said:

If anyone tries to prove otherwise they will fail. A GED allows you to continue to through college, at a level of a normal high school student. It will also have the exact benefits any where else, especially employment.

Not true, employers tend to view people with only GEDs as those who lack the commitment it takes to get a high school diploma. Now that might be different if you used that GED to go get a college degree, but I have flat out heard people say they would rather higher a person with a HS diploma over someone with a GED.

#10 Posted by Fightingfan (38011 posts) -

@ad1x2 said:

@Fightingfan said:

@ad1x2 said:

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

I believe to join the military with a GED you're REQUIRED to have a minimum of 15 college credits (Might vary depending on faction/branch).

Even with 15 college credit you're education is equivalent to a high school kid, according to uncle sam.

Regarding the thread; most jobs won't look at your GED/High school diploma if your education/skills exceed a GED/high school diploma.

"College jobs" probably don't even care.

A 20-year old sergeant with a GED will outrank a 28-year old specialist with a bachelor's degree any day of the week. Of course, the specialist can always apply for OCS if they are eligible to attend and be an officer.

Wouldn't an officer automatically be superior to any enlisty?

There's educated people in the military that want to stay as an enlisty, and not an officer? Sounds like an idiot move to have a bacholors, and not be an officer. Officers make almost 2/3 more.

#11 Posted by osirisx3 (1772 posts) -

I heard the GED is not used in many nations mostly just in north america meaning if you want to go over seas they may not consider you a high school grad.

#12 Edited by Zelda187 (757 posts) -

@Brain_Duster said:

Someone with a GED is technically not what we call a "human".

Really? LOL

I had a kid when I was 17, had to take some time off to provide, ended up getting my GED and getting a bachelors from Old Dominion 5 years later.

Yeah, a diploma is sooo much better than a GED. LOL

Newsflash, neither one means dick unless you either go through college afterwards or get into an apprenticeship in one of the construction trades. Unless you're totally comfortable with making no more than $15 an hour for the rest of your life.

#13 Edited by 4myAmuzumament (1749 posts) -

it's just a diploma that's good enough

#14 Edited by ad1x2 (5562 posts) -

@ad1x2 said:

@Fightingfan said:

@ad1x2 said:

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

I believe to join the military with a GED you're REQUIRED to have a minimum of 15 college credits (Might vary depending on faction/branch).

Even with 15 college credit you're education is equivalent to a high school kid, according to uncle sam.

Regarding the thread; most jobs won't look at your GED/High school diploma if your education/skills exceed a GED/high school diploma.

"College jobs" probably don't even care.

A 20-year old sergeant with a GED will outrank a 28-year old specialist with a bachelor's degree any day of the week. Of course, the specialist can always apply for OCS if they are eligible to attend and be an officer.

Wouldn't an officer automatically be superior to any enlisty?

There's educated people in the military that want to stay as an enlisty, and not an officer? Sounds like an idiot move to have a bacholors, and not be an officer. Officers make almost 2/3 more.

A bachelor's degree isn't an automatic commission. You need at least a secret clearance in order to commission as an officer. People who are eligible to enlist but not eligible to get a secret clearance, such as people who only have a Green Card, people with horrible credit, or people who have certain criminal charges, won't be commissioning even if they have a PhD. Even with all of that you still have to pass OCS or ROTC.

With that, fact of the matter is the guy who has a bachelor's but can't commission because his credit is horrible is going to be taking orders from the sergeant who barely finished high school or has a GED but was competent enough to be promoted to his current rank. That is just how things work in the military.

#15 Posted by lamprey263 (23515 posts) -

people with GEDs are probably assumed to be high school dropouts, so there's social prejudices to take into consideration in their value, I'd imagine people with a high school diploma excel in some area in their electives and do sports, take AP courses, join clubs, and overall is a much better experience

then again I'm sure some people want to accelerate their education, maybe take the GED early to enter college at a younger age

looking back on options other people used in college, it might be better for some high school people to do (if available to them) one of those programs that allows students in high school to take college classes free for both high school and college credit, and as long as long as they're under a certain age or high school grade they'll keep paying their college tuition, that way they can get through half of college free and have their associates by the time they're done

#16 Posted by Fightingfan (38011 posts) -

@ad1x2 said:

@Fightingfan said:

@ad1x2 said:

@Fightingfan said:

@ad1x2 said:

In theory, a GED is supposed to be the same as a high school diploma. However, when it comes down to it not all theories are the same and GED holders are legally discriminated against in many ways. Some colleges flat out will not accept a GED holder no matter how well you scored on the test. The military frequently rejects GED holders who don't have at least a semester of college and the few times they do accept an applicant with a GED they frequently offer them less options for training or less waivers.

There are people who look at GED holders as quitters because they failed to finish high school, usually not taking into consideration the reason they dropped out (pregnancy, major problems at home, etc, not all GED holders were too lazy or dumb to graduate). In many cases those shortcomings can be overcame by successfully going to college for a little while. For example, a GED holder who then spends a year or two in community college may be able to transfer to school that won't accept a GED alone if their grades are good enough.

The GED was originally made in the 1940s so military veterans could get an equivalent to a high school diploma after returning from war and use it to move on to further schooling or jobs and be successful in civilian life. Ironically, over 70 years later they are a big discriminator of GED holders.

I believe to join the military with a GED you're REQUIRED to have a minimum of 15 college credits (Might vary depending on faction/branch).

Even with 15 college credit you're education is equivalent to a high school kid, according to uncle sam.

Regarding the thread; most jobs won't look at your GED/High school diploma if your education/skills exceed a GED/high school diploma.

"College jobs" probably don't even care.

A 20-year old sergeant with a GED will outrank a 28-year old specialist with a bachelor's degree any day of the week. Of course, the specialist can always apply for OCS if they are eligible to attend and be an officer.

Wouldn't an officer automatically be superior to any enlisty?

There's educated people in the military that want to stay as an enlisty, and not an officer? Sounds like an idiot move to have a bacholors, and not be an officer. Officers make almost 2/3 more.

A bachelor's degree isn't an automatic commission. You need at least a secret clearance in order to commission as an officer. People who are eligible to enlist but not eligible to get a secret clearance, such as people who only have a Green Card, people with horrible credit, or people who have certain criminal charges, won't be commissioning even if they have a PhD. Even with all of that you still have to pass OCS or ROTC.

With that, fact of the matter is the guy who has a bachelor's but can't commission because his credit is horrible is going to be taking orders from the sergeant who barely finished high school or has a GED but was competent enough to be promoted to his current rank. That is just how things work in the military.

Yeah, that last part came to mind retrospectively.

I always found it weird when I see my buddy Lawrence (Colonel in the AirForce) show more admiration/respect towards Mr. Brown another family friend - who was simply a sergeant Major.

I was under the impression you could simply join without being an enlisty via simply joining as an officer (Assuming you have a bachelors prior to joining).

#17 Posted by Toxic-Seahorse (4125 posts) -

The way I see it, if you don't have enough discipline to complete High School, you're going to have a really tough time with real life. Of course this excludes those that have to drop out of school due to family problems and stuff like that. A GED is most likely seen as not having enough discipline to get through High School by employers.

#18 Posted by TwistedShade (3164 posts) -

The way I see it, if you don't have enough discipline to complete High School, you're going to have a really tough time with real life. Of course this excludes those that have to drop out of school due to family problems and stuff like that. A GED is most likely seen as not having enough discipline to get through High School by employers.

I got my GED, and it's not that I'm not "disciplined" I was just home schooled.

#19 Posted by LJS9502_basic (150710 posts) -

They are not the same. A high school diploma is a much more positive document than a GED in regard to further endeavors.

#20 Posted by Brain_Duster (403 posts) -

@Zelda187 said:

@Brain_Duster said:

Someone with a GED is technically not what we call a "human".

Really? LOL

I had a kid when I was 17, had to take some time off to provide, ended up getting my GED and getting a bachelors from Old Dominion 5 years later.

Yeah, a diploma is sooo much better than a GED. LOL

Newsflash, neither one means dick unless you either go through college afterwards or get into an apprenticeship in one of the construction trades. Unless you're totally comfortable with making no more than $15 an hour for the rest of your life.

Wow.

You sure proved me wrong.

#21 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

They are not the same. A high school diploma is a much more positive document than a GED in regard to further endeavors.

But wouldn't that cross out once he/she takes his GED to junior college and eventually 4 year University?

#22 Posted by LJS9502_basic (150710 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@LJS9502_basic said:

They are not the same. A high school diploma is a much more positive document than a GED in regard to further endeavors.

But wouldn't that cross out once he/she takes his GED to junior college and eventually 4 year University?

Nothing stops you but you yourself. You can always work to achieve.

#23 Posted by vl4d_l3nin (920 posts) -

No real difference, only a stigmatized one. People associate it with people who've gone to jail, gotten kicked out of the house, laziness, and stupidity. But in many cases, a GED is held by people who wanted to join the workforce at a younger age.

#24 Edited by Dogswithguns (10737 posts) -

They can look down on you however they want. it's up to you to do yourself good things in life.. proof them wrong.

#25 Edited by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@LJS9502_basic said:

They are not the same. A high school diploma is a much more positive document than a GED in regard to further endeavors.

But wouldn't that cross out once he/she takes his GED to junior college and eventually 4 year University?

Nothing stops you but you yourself. You can always work to achieve.

I guess what am I saying is, once he or she gets a 2-4 year degree, the GED/HS Diploma becomes irrelevant. Employers will looked at the most recent highest education.

#26 Edited by foxhound_fox (88053 posts) -

It's too bad most employers these days hire based on education rather than actual ability.

And Gamespot chopped off 95% of my post. Thanks.

There are many uneducated people with great ability that they have gained from experience. It's a shame that a government document is "required" to get a job despite possibly having more real world experience than people with the document.

#27 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

It's too bad most employers these days hire based on education rather than actual ability.

And Gamespot chopped off 95% of my post. Thanks.

There are many uneducated people with great ability that they have gained from experience. It's a shame that a government document is "required" to get a job despite possibly having more real world experience than people with the document.

Are your saying education is overrated?

#28 Edited by foxhound_fox (88053 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

Are your saying education is overrated?

No, I'm saying advanced levels of education don't necessarily make someone more qualified for a particular position for employment (as experience plays an important role as well). If you read what I wrote, you would might have realized that.

#29 Edited by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

Are your saying education is overrated?

No, I'm saying advanced levels of education don't necessarily make someone more qualified for a particular position for employment (as experience plays an important role as well). If you read what I wrote, you would might have realized that.

I got what you said. I was just asking a question. But someone can view your comment and say educated might be overrated.

#30 Posted by HuggyBear1020 (456 posts) -

Literally any community college will accept a GED for admission purposes. If someone is truly a serious student, they can spend a year or two making good grades at the community college and then transfer to a state school.

#31 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

Literally any community college will accept a GED for admission purposes. If someone is truly a serious student, they can spend a year or two making good grades at the community college and then transfer to a state school.

Yeah there is always a story to GED holders.

#32 Posted by slipknot0129 (5490 posts) -

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

#33 Edited by Gaming-Planet (14021 posts) -

I have a GED and it's rather pointless since I go to a community college. No need to show them unless I had an actual HS transcript and a Diploma to skip pre-reqs. I did the placement test instead and that felt a bit more accurate to me than some transcript that means nothing.

I dropped out for various reasons and it was better for me in the long run. If you're in HS, I would try to get into College ASAP and save yourself some years. You need to be committed and mature about your career path.

#34 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

No need to share but what reasons you and your cousin drop out of HS?

#35 Posted by slipknot0129 (5490 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

No need to share but what reasons you and your cousin drop out of HS?

So I could become a Pokemon trainer.

#36 Edited by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

No need to share but what reasons you and your cousin drop out of HS?

So I could become a Pokemon trainer.

Was it worth it?

#37 Edited by slipknot0129 (5490 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

No need to share but what reasons you and your cousin drop out of HS?

So I could become a Pokemon trainer.

Was it worth it?

Yeah it was worth it.

#38 Posted by PSP107 (11894 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

@PSP107 said:

@slipknot0129 said:

Once you go to college, you have no limits with a GED. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself. I have a GED and when I'm finished with my 4 years, I'm going to law school so I can become a lawyer. My cousin has a GED and she is a doctor.

No need to share but what reasons you and your cousin drop out of HS?

So I could become a Pokemon trainer.

Was it worth it?

Yeah it was worth it.

How many you caught? How many of them are good fighters?