College/School GPA and future career?

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#51 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

This topic is eerily similar to a paper/presentation I'm writing for publication at the moment. 

GPAs are barriers to entry for few, but sometimes significant, educational and professional opportunities in life:

Academic Programs:

  • For many competitive academic programs - whether undergraduate, graduate or post-graduate - your GPA will be one of many factors that determine your eligibility.
  • Depending on the institution, your GPA will either hold great or very little significance in determining your admittance, but there will very likely be a minimum threshold that you must satisfy in combination with the other criteria.

Internships:

  • Same as academic programs, with the exception that for most, you MUST satisfy a minimum before the other criteria will be considered for your admittance.

Profession:

  • Your GPA may be used in the same way that both internships and academic programs factor into your admittance.
    • Q: Why does this matter for a recent graduate?
      • A: Because in spite of the fact that you have a degree, the employer has few, if any, objective means of determining the rigor of your curriculum and your academic honesty. Few of us are "smart" (in quotes, because to be honest, intelligence is NOT always the golden ticket to an Ivy League school) enough to get into Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Stanford or any number of other Ivy League schools -- schools that, by their reputation alone, grant you access to opportunities others may never have. With that said, however, even those of you who are so fortunate (again, this isn't to say that you didn't earn it), the work you did in school is a subjective measure of our aptitude, which does very little to prove that you actually know what you purport to.
        • Note: Google "Who has gone to Harvard Law school and failed the bar exam?" and you'll be surprised to see that, despite having gone to the "best" law school in the country, quite a few of their students somehow couldn't pass the very same exam that their lessor counterparts have.
    • Q: How do I avoid being judged solely by my GPA when applying for my first job?
      • A: Provide objective evidence of your competence/mastery of your craft.
    • Q: Like what?
      • A: Regardless of your field of study, it would benefit you greatly to acquire professional certifications in and around your area of study/expertise.
        • Ex: Want to be an accountant?
          • A: A CPA will go a long way to show that you're not only committed to your craft, but you will have also shown - by an indisputable, objective degree of measure - that you have a competency, if not a mastery of the subjects covered by the CPA exam.
        • Ex: Want to break into the fascinating world of Information Security right after you're freshly minted with your fancy Computer Science degree? (I have a bias here)
          • A: Ok -- get your CISSP, CISM, CISA, CEH or, at the very least, your Security+ and we'll see if you're a good "fit."
    • Q: But what if I don't meet the professional experience requirements for the certification?
      • A: Take it anyway, because if you pass it, you'll not only be able to claim that you're an "associate" of "xyz" certification, but you'll be able to show your employer that ALL YOU NEED is the experience you're asking for.

Put it this way, when I'm done with law school in the foreseeable future, I won't be under the illusion that by the mere fact that I got a JD, I'll be entitled to a lucrative position as an attorney for any number of private enterprises. No, while the rest of my cohorts are toiling away at one-upping each other in class, I'm growing my business, my brand, my publications (no, I'm not talking about some silly school journal either) and my professional certifications (CISSP, CISA, Security+ and hopefully the PMP and CEH by the end of the summer). Why? Because employers, especially those who privately own their enterprise, care about the "bottom-line," which as you all know, is your ability to net them a profit.

So, the question you may be asking yourself is "what can I do to overcome my GPA hurdle?" If you ask me, I think you should remember that it really is a subjective measure of your performance in school, which is also littered with subjective means of testing your aptitude. Love them or hate them, standard tests are one way, but achieving or creating other objective measurements of your skills and education are available, such as starting a business, acquiring professional certifications (guess how many people with high GPAs DON'T have these?), creating a product or developing a series of services. Either way, your "poor" GPA can either be a speed bump or a roadblock, depending on how YOU handle it.

Could I be wrong? Sure, but we all have to make our bets ;)

 

Just my take, y'all :)

#53 Posted by BluRayHiDef (10838 posts) -

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

#54 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

BluRayHiDef

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

#55 Posted by BluRayHiDef (10838 posts) -

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

Ernesto_basic

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

I chose those fields of study because they typically garner large salaries, not because I liked them. I found them to be boring AND  difficult.

#56 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

BluRayHiDef

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

I chose those fields of study because they typically garner large salaries, not because I liked themm I found them to be boring AND  difficult.

Ah, that explains it. Why didn't you pursue something that you have some passion for?

#57 Posted by BluRayHiDef (10838 posts) -

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

Ernesto_basic

I chose those fields of study because they typically garner large salaries, not because I liked themm I found them to be boring AND  difficult.

Ah, that explains it. Why didn't you pursue something that you have some passion for?

I didn't have a passion at the time, and I still don't. The closest thing to a passion I have is writing, but I don't have the patience to write a full novel, and writers don't make much.

#58 Posted by lo_Pine (5048 posts) -

[QUOTE="lo_Pine"][QUOTE="lo_Pine"] Nice. chessmaster1989

Chessmaster, If you did double major did you get a job in either field?

I did double major, right now I'm working as a research assistant to a few economics professors to get a bit more experience and a couple more letters of recommendation for PhD.

Well the main reason I did math is because I like math a lot. :P But math is also crucial to economics (economics is more applied math than social science). Unfortunate that your school doesn't offer past Calc 1, but if you're interested in econ you should definitely try to pick up as much math as you can. At least try to pick up multivariable calc and linear algebra, but if you can pick up real analysis and beyond that's great (real analysis will cover topics in multivariable calc as well, just at a higher level).

I love math too. They do offer calc 2 and I'm thinking about pursuing a double major with computer science and you have to take calc 2, discrete math and algorithm analysis there so ill get some good math from that. Depending on if I like intro to computer programming ill do computer science as my second major. If not, math will be my second major. I might go for a Phd too but I'm a junior right now who took a year break cause I was a biochem major but realized I hated working in labs so I dropped out. Now I gotta take the GE classes I didn't take cause I took chem and bio classes instead. I figure if I double major ill be out at age 26 and then go for my Phd if I want to. I feel like that's kind of old but maybe only by a year or so. But yeah, math is the most powerful major IMO because companies will pay well for those who have great analytical skills, plus, I love math too.
#59 Posted by wellbigd (240 posts) -
Question for Cs majors I'm a jr in poly sci but I'm looking to take CS as well, I already Took up to calc 1, are the classes easy or is something thats very hard/ demanding? Also do you have to be a speedy typer?
#60 Posted by SaudiFury (8707 posts) -
TwistedShade
mechanical engineering. i've had 3 interviews, 1 came back no, the other two still waiting.
#61 Posted by brucewayne69 (2859 posts) -
4.45 and I would like to be a lawyer.
#62 Posted by Wolfetan (7522 posts) -

3.0... 2.978. Only because I got a D in Art History, a class I completely ignored and hated. I even paid someone on WoW 200 gold for their essay.lo_Pine
:lol: And I think I'm at a 3.6 right now:D Better then 2nd quater, not as good as 1st.. And I want to be an Audio Engineer, like a studio guy that works for bands, and does the speaker placement for bands for concerts..

#63 Posted by cain006 (8625 posts) -

mechanical engineering. i've had 3 interviews, 1 came back no, the other two still waiting.SaudiFury
Did you go to a school where you could co op? I imagine it would be way harder to get a job out of school without doing something like that.

#64 Posted by dodgerblue13 (20836 posts) -
Core: 3.972. Overall: 3.899. Hopefully can go to grad school for public health.
#65 Posted by CongressManStan (918 posts) -
3.95, Electrical Engineering at Michigan Technological University.
#66 Posted by Pittfan666 (8532 posts) -
Clinical lab science after the biology degree turned out to be a waste.
#67 Posted by Optical_Order (5100 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

BluRayHiDef

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

I chose those fields of study because they typically garner large salaries, not because I liked them. I found them to be boring AND  difficult.

Therein lies your problem. 

Assess what you're actually good at and pick a career from there. Usually what you're good at you tend to like more, and you have the ability to become more proficient in that area and therefore make more money. 

#68 Posted by Guppy507 (17395 posts) -
I failed a class last semester, and it brought my GPA down to 2.89. After this semester it will be over 3.0 again I hope. It really sucks because I don't qualify for an internship this summer from a local company. Future career? Software developer of some kind no doubt.
#69 Posted by SaudiFury (8707 posts) -

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"] mechanical engineering. i've had 3 interviews, 1 came back no, the other two still waiting.cain006

Did you go to a school where you could co op? I imagine it would be way harder to get a job out of school without doing something like that.

college never required it, and i was really tied down studying making sure i got through the program. It was partly the school i was going at, and good chunk my own fault in not planning ahead. When i did my master's it was required to do a summer internship which i did do. the issue is though that i'm not looking at just jobs that say mechanical engineering, but also internships, traineeships, co-ops, assistants, all sorts of lower entry points and gettin' nowhere most of the time. I wonder if I should physically show my face up at their office.
#70 Posted by cain006 (8625 posts) -

[QUOTE="cain006"]

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"] mechanical engineering. i've had 3 interviews, 1 came back no, the other two still waiting.SaudiFury

Did you go to a school where you could co op? I imagine it would be way harder to get a job out of school without doing something like that.

college never required it, and i was really tied down studying making sure i got through the program. It was partly the school i was going at, and good chunk my own fault in not planning ahead. When i did my master's it was required to do a summer internship which i did do. the issue is though that i'm not looking at just jobs that say mechanical engineering, but also internships, traineeships, co-ops, assistants, all sorts of lower entry points and gettin' nowhere most of the time. I wonder if I should physically show my face up at their office.

My school requires it and I can see how you could get bogged with all the other stuff going on and not do it. It's difficult enough to take hard classes, but on top of that having to look for a job? It's a real pain.

#71 Posted by TwistedShade (3149 posts) -

Between the Economic's degree's and the Engineer's GS has alot of freaking smart people here. :o

#72 Posted by brucewayne69 (2859 posts) -

Between the Economic's degree's and the Engineer's GS has alot of freaking smart people here. :o

TwistedShade
Please We also have laihendi
#73 Posted by GreySeal9 (24054 posts) -

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am currently in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

#74 Posted by MrPraline (21308 posts) -
BBA (specialization accountancy), might go through with the MBA or a masters in Economics or accounting if I can be f*cked, but not entirely sure which, if any, master degree I'm going to pursue.
#75 Posted by SaudiFury (8707 posts) -

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

GreySeal9
i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.
#76 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

SaudiFury

i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.

For you, your GRE and GMAT scores are going to be supremely important, depending on the research requirements of your program. If you're going into a Ph.D., program that requires empirical, quantitative and model-based research, your admittance will depend greatly on 1) the level of math courses you've completed prior to application; 2) a nearly flawless GRE/GMAT quantitative score; and 3) recommendations from reputable persons.

Also, from experience, be sure to apply to no less than 15 programs -- Ph.D., progams (again, depending on the field of study/research) can be HIGHLY competetive for Tier 1 & 2 research institutions (both public and private).

#77 Posted by MrPraline (21308 posts) -

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

Ernesto_basic

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

This is a genuinely nice and kind post. +1
#78 Posted by chessmaster1989 (29099 posts) -

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"][QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

Ernesto_basic

i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.

For you, your GRE and GMAT scores are going to be supremely important, depending on the research requirements of your program. If you're going into a Ph.D., program that requires empirical, quantitative and model-based research, your admittance will depend greatly on 1) the level of math courses you've completed prior to application; 2) a nearly flawless GRE/GMAT quantitative score; and 3) recommendations from reputable persons.

Also, from experience, be sure to apply to no less than 15 programs -- Ph.D., progams (again, depending on the field of study/research) can be HIGHLY competetive for Tier 1 & 2 research institutions (both public and private).

GRE score is more of a first screen from what I hear. e.g. for any quantitative/math-intensive PhD, you'd better have at least a 780 quantitative score.

#79 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"] i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward. chessmaster1989

For you, your GRE and GMAT scores are going to be supremely important, depending on the research requirements of your program. If you're going into a Ph.D., program that requires empirical, quantitative and model-based research, your admittance will depend greatly on 1) the level of math courses you've completed prior to application; 2) a nearly flawless GRE/GMAT quantitative score; and 3) recommendations from reputable persons.

Also, from experience, be sure to apply to no less than 15 programs -- Ph.D., progams (again, depending on the field of study/research) can be HIGHLY competetive for Tier 1 & 2 research institutions (both public and private).

GRE score is more of a first screen from what I hear. e.g. for any quantitative/math-intensive PhD, you'd better have at least a 780 quantitative score.

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

#80 Posted by achilles614 (4847 posts) -
3.88, but that's because I'm in a community college...I mean "state" college. I want to transfer to the university of central Florida or the University of Florida for Electrical Engineering. Hoping I can keep my GPA up, I'm taking calc 2 this semester and while it's not exactly hard it does take some studying...especially in the context of 17 credit hours and two clubs.
#81 Posted by Jazz_Fan (29516 posts) -

Averaged a 3.6 in highschool; currently have a 4.0 in Community College after one semester. Done all this with the least amount of effort and motivation possible.

Will try to transfer to either Stanford or Berkeley in two years (assuming I'm still alive). Could prob get into Stanford because of nepotism.

#82 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

Averaged a 3.6 in highschool; currently have a 4.0 in Community College after one semester. Done all this with the least amount of effort and motivation possible.

Will try to transfer to either Stanford or Berkeley in two years (assuming I'm still alive). Could prob get into Stanford because of nepotism.

Jazz_Fan

LOL, I appreciate your candor, bud :)

#83 Posted by chessmaster1989 (29099 posts) -

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"]

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

For you, your GRE and GMAT scores are going to be supremely important, depending on the research requirements of your program. If you're going into a Ph.D., program that requires empirical, quantitative and model-based research, your admittance will depend greatly on 1) the level of math courses you've completed prior to application; 2) a nearly flawless GRE/GMAT quantitative score; and 3) recommendations from reputable persons.

Also, from experience, be sure to apply to no less than 15 programs -- Ph.D., progams (again, depending on the field of study/research) can be HIGHLY competetive for Tier 1 & 2 research institutions (both public and private).

Ernesto_basic

GRE score is more of a first screen from what I hear. e.g. for any quantitative/math-intensive PhD, you'd better have at least a 780 quantitative score.

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.
#84 Posted by GreySeal9 (24054 posts) -

[QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

SaudiFury

i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.

I feel you.

#85 Posted by chessmaster1989 (29099 posts) -

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"][QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

GreySeal9

i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.

I feel you.

Good luck with English teacher man, from what I hear it's a tough job market. (also good luck with Masters)!
#86 Posted by GreySeal9 (24054 posts) -

[QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"] i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward. chessmaster1989

I feel you.

Good luck with English teacher man, from what I hear it's a tough job market. (also good luck with Masters)!

Thanks a bunch!

Thinking about doing some tutoring/substitute work to build up my resume.

#87 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"] GRE score is more of a first screen from what I hear. e.g. for any quantitative/math-intensive PhD, you'd better have at least a 780 quantitative score.

chessmaster1989

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.

Awesome choices!

As you probably already know, Ph.D., programs for finance & economics are some of the most competitive (well, they are the MOST for business schools) programs to get into. I'm sure you've done your homework and you'll no doubt find the right program for your needs, but it would be wise to apply to as many programs as you can (we'd all love to get into the top 10 tier 1 programs, but there are plenty of great tier 2 & 3 programs with much higher rates of success in terms of dissertation defense), just in case you don't get into the ones you have your heart set on. As far as professor's go, I have found that the more research-oriented they are, the more self-important and pedantic they tend to be, whereas their teaching-oriented counterparts are generally more inclined to, you know, act like a decent human being; my friends and I fall into the second category.

One more thing: A Ph.D., in either of those fields you mentioned are some of the very few that translate well into the private and public sector, so kuddos to you! I'm sure you've figured this out by now, but most economists that are worth a damn have their doctorates ;)

Good luck!

#88 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="BluRayHiDef"]

GPA: Abysmal. Somewhere between a 2.0 and a 2.5.

Future Career: Don't know. Currently work at a warehouse for a lingere company making a whopping $9.00 per hour.

Dropped out of college back in May of 2012 after earning 80 credits. Majored in Civil Engineering, then switched to Computer Science. Have lost ambition. 

MrPraline

The areas of study you pursued are notoriously challenging, so don't be so down on yourself. Besides, you should remember why you chose to pursue them in the first place, which I assume, is because you like to create, design and/or build things/solutions. Want to know what the nice thing is about computer science? You don't really need that degree to do what one with that degree aspires to do. If you like to code, then by all means, start coding, buddy! If I were hiring a coder, I could give two sh*ts about what he got in his classes -- I want to know if he can build what I'm wanting!

If I were you, I'd create a portfolio of applications/programs ;)

This is a genuinely nice and kind post. +1

Thanks, buddy -- I'm opinionated as hell, but I try my best to encourage and help others where I can ;)

#89 Posted by chessmaster1989 (29099 posts) -

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"][QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

Ernesto_basic

Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.

Awesome! As you probably already know, Ph.D., programs for finance & economics are some of the most competitive (well, they are the MOST for business schools) programs to get into. I'm sure you've done your homework and you'll no doubt find the right program for your needs, but it would be wise to apply to as many programs as you can, just in case you don't get into the ones you have your heart set on. As far as professor's go, I have found that the more research-oriented they are, the more self-important and pedantic they tend to be, whereas their teaching-oriented counterparts are generally more inclined to, you know, act like a decent human being.

One more thing: A Ph.D., in either of those fields you mentioned are some of the very few that translate well into the private and public sector, so kuddos to you! I'm sure you've figured this out by now, but most economists that are worth a damn have their doctorates ;)

Good luck!

Yeah I'm aware of everything you're advising there, but thanks all the same. Probably going to be applying to 10-12 programs, maybe a couple more. And I definitely have heard some horror stories about working with certain professors. I know a couple of people who RA'd for James Heckman, and by all accounts that's a f*cking nightmare.
#90 Posted by Ernesto_basic (2123 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"] Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.chessmaster1989

Awesome! As you probably already know, Ph.D., programs for finance & economics are some of the most competitive (well, they are the MOST for business schools) programs to get into. I'm sure you've done your homework and you'll no doubt find the right program for your needs, but it would be wise to apply to as many programs as you can, just in case you don't get into the ones you have your heart set on. As far as professor's go, I have found that the more research-oriented they are, the more self-important and pedantic they tend to be, whereas their teaching-oriented counterparts are generally more inclined to, you know, act like a decent human being.

One more thing: A Ph.D., in either of those fields you mentioned are some of the very few that translate well into the private and public sector, so kuddos to you! I'm sure you've figured this out by now, but most economists that are worth a damn have their doctorates ;)

Good luck!

Yeah I'm aware of everything you're advising there, but thanks all the same. Probably going to be applying to 10-12 programs, maybe a couple more. And I definitely have heard some horror stories about working with certain professors. I know a couple of people who RA'd for James Heckman, and by all accounts that's a f*cking nightmare.

Yep, I've met a few tenured "geniuses" in the University of Texas system who treat their RAs like slaves... worse-yet, I've been told that they often (and I'm sure this is across the board in Academe) take full credit for any novel ideas discovered by their RAs, giving them a mere co-authorship instead of the due deference and credit they deserve.

I'm excited to head back into Academe when I'm done with my JD, but this time, I'm not putting all of my eggs in the same basket. I've known quite a few Ph.Ds who have had to literally travel the armpits of the country, just to find a job to feed their family, when they're either cut for political reasons (I've witnessed this many times) or because of their failure to meet their publication quota. No, this time, I'm going back in to teach, sell my books and find any bright students that I can afford to hire on as employees for my business.

Moreover, with the way education is shifting to a distance-learning model that's heavily reliant on adjunct support, I'm weary of comitting 100% of my professional endeavours to any institution.

#91 Posted by SaudiFury (8707 posts) -

[QUOTE="SaudiFury"][QUOTE="GreySeal9"]

I had a 3.5 when I graduated and I am current in the application process for my Masters. I've sent in all the materials they need, so now I have to wait until March or April to know if I've been accepted.

I'm planning to become an English teacher, either high school or university.

Ernesto_basic

i'm actually right now in the process of sending applications of PhD at the moment. trying to cover all my basis, life has been in limbo for me for almost a year and crushingly depressing not being able to move forward.

For you, your GRE and GMAT scores are going to be supremely important, depending on the research requirements of your program. If you're going into a Ph.D., program that requires empirical, quantitative and model-based research, your admittance will depend greatly on 1) the level of math courses you've completed prior to application; 2) a nearly flawless GRE/GMAT quantitative score; and 3) recommendations from reputable persons.

Also, from experience, be sure to apply to no less than 15 programs -- Ph.D., progams (again, depending on the field of study/research) can be HIGHLY competetive for Tier 1 & 2 research institutions (both public and private).

yeah, i think i can get recommendations from my engineering professors. I have right now a total of 5 programs right now i'm persuing. 1 college has been taking a very long time to come to a decision, and it seems like i gotta keep 'checking' on it for it to move anywhere. I've taken the GRE, didn't do as spectacularly as i could of done, but i do meet the requirements. I did find it odd that they don't seem to care about what you did during your masters, and alot of the focus is on what you did during your bachelor, which could be trouble for me. because my final GPA is not so great.. at 2.45. but hopefully if they see transcript they'll see the grades rise dramatically in my last two years there..
#92 Posted by MathMattS (4002 posts) -

I finished undergrad with a 3.0 GPA and finished graduate school with a 3.3 GPA. I have an M.S. in Mathematics and I'm a professor of mathematics.

#93 Posted by xdude85 (4339 posts) -
Currently at a 3.1 GPA, I want to do something in the English department, but I'm not sure what specifically.
#94 Posted by Mochyc (4421 posts) -
I'm in my last semester double majoring in economics and finance, minoring in math. Around 3.85 GPA. For the most competitive lines of work, they do care about your GPA (more specifically if you got honors or not). I currently have little clue on what I want to do. I want to work in finance, that I know. However, I'm not sure in what kind of company (investment bank, hedge fund, private bank, etc...) or which position (economist, analyst in mergers & acquisitions, corporate finance, etc...). Most probably the decision will be made for me depending on where I can get a job, but right now I'm hoping for a job as an economist. Other than the math behind the finance, I find most parts of finance rather boring.
#95 Posted by SpartanMSU (3440 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"] GRE score is more of a first screen from what I hear. e.g. for any quantitative/math-intensive PhD, you'd better have at least a 780 quantitative score.

chessmaster1989

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.

Have you taken the CFA at all?

#96 Posted by chessmaster1989 (29099 posts) -

[QUOTE="chessmaster1989"][QUOTE="Ernesto_basic"]

Yeah, again -- from experience -- that score is a deal-breaker if it's too low. Aside from that, they're going to consider the number and types of math courses you took during your undergraduate education (crappy thing is, most Ph.D., programs could care less what you did in your graduate degree). If, however, the program you're looking into is more qualitative, then these criterion will be of lessor importance.

Note: If anyone ever wants to get into law school for patent law, do yourself a favor and review the undergraduate requirements to sit for the patent bar exam... you can have undergraduate AND graduate degrees in computer science, software engineering and other "engineering" areas and STILL fall short of their silly pre-requisites. (Can you tell this happened to me?)

What kind of Ph.D., are you looking to get? Also, what are your reasons for pursuing this kind of doctorate? There are few reasons to spend 5 years of your life (2 of which will be dedicated to statistical research courses, while the remainder are your "ABD" years, dedicated to developing your dissertation) on something that:

1) limits your career prospects (you're either going to research for private/public industry, or you're going to be a professor, where you'll be REQUIRED to publish in peer-reviewed journals, just to keep your job);

2) isn't guaranteed (for your programs of choice, be sure to investigate how many people spend those 5 years passing their courses, publishing and yet are STILL denied in their dissertation defense -- they kick you out with a mere master's degree in these cases); and

3) may preclude you from enjoying life (also of note, your advisors -- again, depending on the program -- often treat you like crap, because they were treated the same and know no better. Honestly, coming from a 4 year stint as a professor, I can tell you that professors (lawyers and doctors are the same) are some of the least professional people to deal with when it comes to the workplace... I've seen some say things to each other that would merit no less than an a$$ kicking anywhere else beyond a faculty meeting.)

Just something to consider :)

SpartanMSU

Hoping to do economics PhD (or possibly finance, likely I'll be applying to economics PhDs as well as finance PhDs through business schools). I just enjoy research, worked for a professor for two years as an undergraduate and am working right now as a full-time research assistant (applying for PhD programs for entry in Fall 2014). Maybe I've just had a good experience, but all five professors I've worked for have been great to work for.

Have you taken the CFA at all?

Nope
#97 Posted by pie-junior (2821 posts) -
[QUOTE="lo_Pine"] You an Econ major? I am too and the highest math we have to take is calculus 1.

Never heard of an econ program that doesn't require calc 2.
#98 Posted by mrbojangles25 (31985 posts) -

graduated a few years ago.  Scraped by with a 2.15 cumulative (though, to my credit, my major GPA was like a 3.5) :P

current career is brewer...future career is...brewer :D

#99 Posted by GeneralMufinMan (368 posts) -
graduated architectural technology program with a 3.8 but went back fro computer networking, currently have a 3.8 in that as well. Hoping to finish college, go to Unniversity and eventually wind up as a software engineer.
#100 Posted by Aquat1cF1sh (10862 posts) -
2.69 right now, will probably get it to an official 2.7 before I graduate in May. Majoring in Biology. Will probably work in a lab somewhere.