#1 Edited by turtlethetaffer (16672 posts) -

What are the point of these? I've seen a few movies that are considered Art House Films and I gotta say, I don't get it. Two of the ones that I've seen are German (Solo Sunny and Barbara). During their run times, I was thinking "Okay, when are they going to get to the point?" Then, when the "point" came, I thought "That's it?"I researched the movies after the fact and discovered that they are both very well received (especially Barbara). But the majority of the movie was nothing but silence, and what dialogue was there felt trite and pointless. I didn't feel like I got anything out of them, yet they are generally considered to be great movies. I also saw a more recent movie called We Are What We Are and, again, it was boring as hell up until the ending and the ending was hardly worth the wait. But I researched it and, again, found that it was generally well received by critics.

I will say that I enjoyed Drive a lot, though, but that's because, even though it was slow in the beginning, there was a cool story and things actually happened.

I'm not somebody who needs constant explosions or anything like that and I can enjoy slow paced movies if done right. But in my experience wit "art house" films, I can't understand the appeal or the point of them. Anyone care to explain?

#2 Edited by SaintLeonidas (26038 posts) -

"We Are What We Are" is terrible. Haven't seen the other two you mentioned. But I could ask the point of pretty much any "genre" or type of film. It is all about preference; and it isn't like they are all well received. In many cases when an "art house" film fails, it fails hard. Those who do enjoy them, like myself, usually do because they tend to be visually unlike most releases; and they tackle themes that other films are unwilling to touch. Most do move slowly and have minimal dialogue, and rely on imagery and atmosphere to get their themes across. I think what makes them least accessible to casual film watchers is that they do often require extra effort to truly appreciate. They are like the books you get in school that you don't quite understand the point until you have to research, write or discuss them with others. Some hate having to put extra thought into art house films, for me it is the best part about them.

#3 Edited by turtlethetaffer (16672 posts) -

@SaintLeonidas: I can appreciate visual storytelling (I enjoy a few of David Lynch's movies like Eraserhead and Lost Highway) but from what I've seen this particular brand consists a lot of staring off into space and long pauses in the dialogue. To reference Drive again, there were a lot of visuals and the music also really helped suck you into the movie but I have yet to see that in the other ones I've watched.

And I'm glad you agree with me on We Are What We Are. Critics generally liked it and it almost put me to sleep. No idea how anybody can enjoy it.

#4 Edited by one_plum (6344 posts) -

@SaintLeonidas: I can appreciate visual storytelling (I enjoy a few of David Lynch's movies like Eraserhead and Lost Highway) but from what I've seen this particular brand consists a lot of staring off into space and long pauses in the dialogue. To reference Drive again, there were a lot of visuals and the music also really helped suck you into the movie but I have yet to see that in the other ones I've watched.

And I'm glad you agree with me on We Are What We Are. Critics generally liked it and it almost put me to sleep. No idea how anybody can enjoy it.

Coming from someone who probably have never seen such movies, I can understand the appeal of those long pauses. I think it would make it look more realistic. Most movies have a pacing and dialogue that go with the plot so conveniently that they probably don't feel as natural/realistic.