Are Young people finally coming to their senses?

#1 Posted by loco145 (10755 posts) -

THE proportion of new American high school graduates who go on to college — a figure that rose regularly for decades — now appears to be declining.

Last October, just 65.9 percent of people who had graduated from high school the previous spring had enrolled in college, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said this week. That was down from 66.2 percent the previous year and was the lowest figure in a decade. The high point came in 2009, when 70.1 percent of new graduates had gone on to college.

Source.

65.9 percent is still too high, though.

#2 Posted by GazaAli (22492 posts) -

I came here expecting a topic about American high education; was not disappointed.

The decline is minuscule and from a statistical point of view its anecdotal so yea there isn't much to be said about it.

#3 Posted by lostrib (33450 posts) -

When will you come to your senses and stop making threads?

#4 Posted by loco145 (10755 posts) -
@lostrib said:

When will you come to your senses and stop making threads?

When the number is at the single digits, where it should be.

#5 Posted by ferrari2001 (16761 posts) -

@loco145 said:
@lostrib said:

When will you come to your senses and stop making threads?

When the number is at the single digits, where it should be.

lol what? I agree that college should not be necessary for proper employment but as humans we should be creatures who seek after knowledge and understanding. Colleges should be institutions that provide us with some of that knowledge. I believe that to not seek after knowledge is to make ourselves less human. Colleges should focus on providing a well rounded education and focus less on putting people into the work place. We've got a long way to go but the answer is a change in the education system, not the number of people going to school.

#6 Edited by thegerg (14708 posts) -

Why should "the number" be in single digits?

#7 Posted by jimkabrhel (15417 posts) -

Oh come on. In a society that is increasingly based on technology, we need scientists and engineers to be leading the forefront, rather than be depending on foreign countries.

I agree that not everyone should go to college, but there are tech schools and other programs that can provide great training for other very important jobs that don't require a college degree.

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

Are you upset by your college experience?

#8 Edited by chessmaster1989 (29082 posts) -

Keep crying because you didn't go to college TC.

#9 Posted by PSP107 (11700 posts) -

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

sadly a lot of employers still are interested in 4 year degrees.

#10 Edited by dave123321 (33647 posts) -

Tc, don't be bitter like the rest of us

#11 Edited by HoolaHoopMan (7723 posts) -

Still trying to justify not going to college, TC?

#12 Posted by jimkabrhel (15417 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

sadly a lot of employers still are interested in 4 year degrees.

Why is that sad, exactly?

#13 Posted by Kevlar101 (6010 posts) -

I'm beginning to realize just how unfriendly the GS community has become.

I am not necessarily referring to this thread specifically, just in general.

#14 Posted by lostrib (33450 posts) -

I'm beginning to realize just how unfriendly the GS community has become.

I am not necessarily referring to this thread specifically, just in general.

We're just tired of TC's constant crap

#15 Posted by Kevlar101 (6010 posts) -

@lostrib said:

@Kevlar101 said:

I'm beginning to realize just how unfriendly the GS community has become.

I am not necessarily referring to this thread specifically, just in general.

We're just tired of TC's constant crap

Do I need to highlight?

I said that I was not specifically referring to this thread. I just went into a randomly chosen thread to say that.

#16 Posted by lostrib (33450 posts) -

@lostrib said:

@Kevlar101 said:

I'm beginning to realize just how unfriendly the GS community has become.

I am not necessarily referring to this thread specifically, just in general.

We're just tired of TC's constant crap

Do I need to highlight?

I said that I was not specifically referring to this thread. I just went into a randomly chosen thread to say that.

Well when you have a bunch of dumb trolls continuously making topics like this one, you're not going to get very good responses

#17 Edited by one_plum (6332 posts) -

@Kevlar101 said:

@lostrib said:

We're just tired of TC's constant crap

Do I need to highlight?

I said that I was not specifically referring to this thread. I just went into a randomly chosen thread to say that.

It's always been this way, unless if you go far back when this place was under Gamestapo rules.

#18 Posted by IMAHAPYHIPPO (2560 posts) -

Oiy. These stupid threads. So many people go to college and get into the fields they desire. Sorry you didn't, but stop trying to ruin it for everybody.

#19 Posted by PSP107 (11700 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

sadly a lot of employers still are interested in 4 year degrees.

Why is that sad, exactly?

You said college degree isn't as powerful as it once was but I'm disagreeing. Companies still value education.

#20 Posted by jimkabrhel (15417 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

sadly a lot of employers still are interested in 4 year degrees.

Why is that sad, exactly?

You said college degree isn't as powerful as it once was but I'm disagreeing. Companies still value education.

Sorry I misunderstood you. I thought you were going in that other direction. I know that companies still value a degree, but students aren't often choosing the best degree to get them those jobs. Many students are going to college to party, and not focusing on the education part of it, which is sad. Or those students pick majors that are easy that have not applicability to the real world.

#21 Posted by PSP107 (11700 posts) -

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

@PSP107 said:

@jimkabrhel said:

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

sadly a lot of employers still are interested in 4 year degrees.

Why is that sad, exactly?

You said college degree isn't as powerful as it once was but I'm disagreeing. Companies still value education.

Sorry I misunderstood you. I thought you were going in that other direction. I know that companies still value a degree, but students aren't often choosing the best degree to get them those jobs. Many students are going to college to party, and not focusing on the education part of it, which is sad. Or those students pick majors that are easy that have not applicability to the real world.

You make a valid point here. Most people with certain degrees will get jobs that has nothing to do with their major concentration. Part of that is the economy though.

#22 Posted by xdude85 (4329 posts) -

I would ask if you have anything better to do, but since you clearly don't, then keep on bitching about the evil college agenda that you think exists.

#23 Posted by speedfreak48t5p (6663 posts) -

What a crappy thread.

#24 Edited by comp_atkins (31213 posts) -

obviously college is not for everyone and it would be better if people for whom it is not for to forgo going to college rather than wasting the expense of going, realizing it's not for them, and quitting before getting their degree. that being said, to suggest the % of people whom should continue to college ought to be in the single digits is ridiculous and was thrown in there simply to troll people.

#25 Posted by Master_Live (14051 posts) -

A tradition unlike any other...

#26 Posted by XilePrincess (13117 posts) -

It used to be affordable and worth it to go to college because it could actually get you somewhere in a career. People could work a summer job and pay for their tuition. Now you basically have to give up a kidney or your first born on the black market to pay down your loans.

College is a cash cow. I'm not saying it's useless, because it isn't, but it's becoming a little silly the lengths it's gotten to. For example:

-You need a degree for everything now, even the stuff the uneducated used to dominate. There are courses to teach you how to be a receptionist that are now required by many job openings, as if answering phones and balancing an appointment book is so hard you need a college degree to do it.

-Degrees for aforementioned "do you really need a degree for that?" jobs cost a ton of money, even through community college. Nothing is cheap. In my city here in Canada, for a school to teach you how to type and quiz you on some basic medical or legal terms (whether you're becoming a medical office receptionist or a law firm receptionist) it will cost you somewhere in the ballpark of $16,000. Just for a piece of paper to say you can type adequately and know terms you probably already knew from watching Grey's Anatomy and Law and Order.

-People who can't afford the equivalent of a down-payment on a house or the entire cost of a new car to be taught something stupid are pushed back down the ladder. You either find a niche where you can make money (lots of people heading to the oil patches because of that, it requires no education and little experience because it's such hard work) or you sink. The disadvantaged stay disadvantaged. If you can't afford college, you'll be stuck flipping burgers and living with your parents for a long time. That's why so many young people are still at home, because they can't even afford to move out, especially not with the costs of college on their shoulders. They take the charity where they can get it.

-College towns have sickeningly high rent. I live in one, and we get a LOT of rich kids from other countries, so 1k a month for a one-bedroom basement suite or apartment isn't unusual. If you're not a rich kid from somewhere, you're probably just a regular person far enough away from home that they can't stay with family, so they have to find a place with some roommates, and even split between 2 that's a lot on top of everything.

-If, by chance, you're given the blessing of being able to get into some kind of college program and can pay the startup fees, you'll probably have to take out loans. And that's where the real money suck begins. You might be stuck paying off those loans for decades, especially if, like many, you graduate and your degree takes you nowhere, and you end up being a fry cook beside the guy who never went to college because he couldn't afford it.


That was a bunch of rambling, but my TL;DR point is that I don't think it's that people are 'wising up', I just think the financial side of college has become so overwhelming that many people can't manage to do it, and that's why you're seeing that number drop.

#27 Posted by gamerguru100 (10463 posts) -

It used to be affordable and worth it to go to college because it could actually get you somewhere in a career. People could work a summer job and pay for their tuition. Now you basically have to give up a kidney or your first born on the black market to pay down your loans.

College is a cash cow. I'm not saying it's useless, because it isn't, but it's becoming a little silly the lengths it's gotten to. For example:

-You need a degree for everything now, even the stuff the uneducated used to dominate. There are courses to teach you how to be a receptionist that are now required by many job openings, as if answering phones and balancing an appointment book is so hard you need a college degree to do it.

-Degrees for aforementioned "do you really need a degree for that?" jobs cost a ton of money, even through community college. Nothing is cheap. In my city here in Canada, for a school to teach you how to type and quiz you on some basic medical or legal terms (whether you're becoming a medical office receptionist or a law firm receptionist) it will cost you somewhere in the ballpark of $16,000. Just for a piece of paper to say you can type adequately and know terms you probably already knew from watching Grey's Anatomy and Law and Order.

-People who can't afford the equivalent of a down-payment on a house or the entire cost of a new car to be taught something stupid are pushed back down the ladder. You either find a niche where you can make money (lots of people heading to the oil patches because of that, it requires no education and little experience because it's such hard work) or you sink. The disadvantaged stay disadvantaged. If you can't afford college, you'll be stuck flipping burgers and living with your parents for a long time. That's why so many young people are still at home, because they can't even afford to move out, especially not with the costs of college on their shoulders. They take the charity where they can get it.

-College towns have sickeningly high rent. I live in one, and we get a LOT of rich kids from other countries, so 1k a month for a one-bedroom basement suite or apartment isn't unusual. If you're not a rich kid from somewhere, you're probably just a regular person far enough away from home that they can't stay with family, so they have to find a place with some roommates, and even split between 2 that's a lot on top of everything.

-If, by chance, you're given the blessing of being able to get into some kind of college program and can pay the startup fees, you'll probably have to take out loans. And that's where the real money suck begins. You might be stuck paying off those loans for decades, especially if, like many, you graduate and your degree takes you nowhere, and you end up being a fry cook beside the guy who never went to college because he couldn't afford it.

That was a bunch of rambling, but my TL;DR point is that I don't think it's that people are 'wising up', I just think the financial side of college has become so overwhelming that many people can't manage to do it, and that's why you're seeing that number drop.

*standing ovation*

#28 Edited by CyberLips (1807 posts) -

@XilePrincess: I agree with everything. College tuitions are sickeningly high and not just in the US. That's the biggest problem i have right now, i don't want to be 40,000 euros in debt just because i want an education.

#29 Edited by MakeMeaSammitch (3753 posts) -

TC is bitter.

he's a failure and lashes out at the internets.

#30 Edited by WolfgarTheQuiet (199 posts) -

Thought this was about US being operated by world banking mobsters.

Anyways Education and Health system should be free for everyone. Our tax money covers that, no matter which country you from pays for that, to bad the corrupt governments use it for themselves and pointless wars for resources and initiation of the world bank into the particular country that does not have it, Only two left since 9/11, Iran and North Korea. Before 9/11 all the countries US attacked until now did not have world bank mobsters running things.

#31 Edited by thegerg (14708 posts) -

@WolfgarTheQuiet said:

Thought this was about US being operated by world banking mobsters.

Anyways Education and Health system should be free for everyone. Our tax money covers that, no matter which country you from pays for that, to bad the corrupt governments use it for themselves and pointless wars for resources and initiation of the world bank into the particular country that does not have it, Only two left since 9/11, Iran and North Korea. Before 9/11 all the countries US attacked until now did not have world bank mobsters running things.

"Anyways Education and Health system should be free for everyone."

Unfortunately, that's simply impossible. Doctors and educators have to put a lot of effort into their work. To expect them to work for free is just plain unrealistic.

#32 Posted by WolfgarTheQuiet (199 posts) -

@thegerg If you paid attention i specified that our tax money covers it, well if it was not wasted on bullshit :)

Well the world is upside down anyways, if this is what the existence is supposed to be, the way it has been since people got sucked into the Matrix, is all about, whats the point haha

#33 Posted by thegerg (14708 posts) -

@thegerg If you paid attention i specified that our tax money covers it, well if it was not wasted on bullshit :)

Well the world is upside down anyways, if this is what the existence is supposed to be, the way it has been since people got sucked into the Matrix, is all about, whats the point haha

I did pay attention. The fact that tax money pays for it has no bearing on the fact that the idea of free education and medical care is just plain silly.

If you would have paid attention you would have been able to see that.

#34 Edited by -ParaNormaN- (723 posts) -

Nah. College isn't for some people but a lot would still like to go and get degrees. My education pretty much ended after high school since I just wanted to go straight to work. I don't have any regrets because I haven't found something I'd like to do in college. If someday I do find something I want to major in, then I just might actually go. Doesn't matter if I'm in my 30's, 40's or 50's.

#35 Posted by byof_america (1341 posts) -

@one_plum said:

@Kevlar101 said:

@lostrib said:

We're just tired of TC's constant crap

Do I need to highlight?

I said that I was not specifically referring to this thread. I just went into a randomly chosen thread to say that.

It's always been this way, unless if you go far back when this place was under Gamestapo rules.

There were a select few awesome users who could get around the TOU during that era, namely Cyber. Always laughed when he decided it was time to destroy somebody. He was 'mean' in a funny way, which is what I think a lot of users try to do, but fail miserably.

#36 Posted by Minishdriveby (9633 posts) -

I would say to have a plan before going to college, and don't waste your time at college. I'm about to finish up, and I sort of wish I waited a year or two, took a technician test to work a little bit before going to college. I should have done more with labs and research too while here. A degree isn't worthless, especially in the Math or Science field... well a BS might be but it's required for even higher education. I guess one of the problems with a college degree now a days is it's not worth much if they hand them out like candy.

#37 Posted by 4myAmuzumament (1746 posts) -

community college is where it's at. learn what you need to learn and gtfo... degrees don't matter much either.

#38 Edited by theone86 (20555 posts) -

@loco145 said:
@lostrib said:

When will you come to your senses and stop making threads?

When the number is at the single digits, where it should be.

lol what? I agree that college should not be necessary for proper employment but as humans we should be creatures who seek after knowledge and understanding. Colleges should be institutions that provide us with some of that knowledge. I believe that to not seek after knowledge is to make ourselves less human. Colleges should focus on providing a well rounded education and focus less on putting people into the work place. We've got a long way to go but the answer is a change in the education system, not the number of people going to school.

Yeah, but at the same time are we ever going to achieve those sorts of goals by playing into the current college system? When college costs around twenty grand a year on the cheap end it can't be seen as anything but a career investment. Take someone who shares your perspective, goes to college in one of the majors where becoming a professor is their best bet at employment, let's do a low-end estimate and say they pay eighty-grand for undergrad and get a full ride for grad school through a doctoral program, they still end up coming out of college with some pretty significant debt. They then take on a job as a professor partly because it's one of the only jobs that will let them keep their head above water, and they're not really fighting the cost of college because the way they see it they're not doing horribly well. They may throw some shots at the administration, but at the end of the day they need their job. They do a bunch of busy-work and butt-kissing for tenure, they recruit as many students as they can because if they don't their department is going to lose money, and some of those students choose the major because they genuinely like it. They choose to go on to become university professors, and the cycle continues.

I'm like you, I value learning for the sake of learning, but I'm growing increasingly disenchanted with the college atmosphere. More and more college programs are veering away from learning for its own sake and towards justifying their expenses on the merit of future returns (It's actually slightly amusing for me watching Kantians trying to justify philosophy degrees on consequentialist grounds). If you want more of a focus on well-rounded education than on putting people in the workplace then the American college is the last place you should be defending. Really, I think the best answer would to be to start teaching college subjects earlier in the educational process, but American education system is moving away from that tout de suite.

#39 Edited by theone86 (20555 posts) -

community college is where it's at. learn what you need to learn and gtfo... degrees don't matter much either.

In my experience most community colleges tend to stop at the 200 level. Also, degrees are one of the prime selling points for bachelor's degrees and higher. Basically the higher you got he better your job prospects. An associate's is worth slightly more than a high school diploma.

#40 Posted by EPICCOMMANDER (426 posts) -

@XilePrincess said:

It used to be affordable and worth it to go to college because it could actually get you somewhere in a career. People could work a summer job and pay for their tuition. Now you basically have to give up a kidney or your first born on the black market to pay down your loans.

College is a cash cow. I'm not saying it's useless, because it isn't, but it's becoming a little silly the lengths it's gotten to. For example:

-You need a degree for everything now, even the stuff the uneducated used to dominate. There are courses to teach you how to be a receptionist that are now required by many job openings, as if answering phones and balancing an appointment book is so hard you need a college degree to do it.

-Degrees for aforementioned "do you really need a degree for that?" jobs cost a ton of money, even through community college. Nothing is cheap. In my city here in Canada, for a school to teach you how to type and quiz you on some basic medical or legal terms (whether you're becoming a medical office receptionist or a law firm receptionist) it will cost you somewhere in the ballpark of $16,000. Just for a piece of paper to say you can type adequately and know terms you probably already knew from watching Grey's Anatomy and Law and Order.

-People who can't afford the equivalent of a down-payment on a house or the entire cost of a new car to be taught something stupid are pushed back down the ladder. You either find a niche where you can make money (lots of people heading to the oil patches because of that, it requires no education and little experience because it's such hard work) or you sink. The disadvantaged stay disadvantaged. If you can't afford college, you'll be stuck flipping burgers and living with your parents for a long time. That's why so many young people are still at home, because they can't even afford to move out, especially not with the costs of college on their shoulders. They take the charity where they can get it.

-College towns have sickeningly high rent. I live in one, and we get a LOT of rich kids from other countries, so 1k a month for a one-bedroom basement suite or apartment isn't unusual. If you're not a rich kid from somewhere, you're probably just a regular person far enough away from home that they can't stay with family, so they have to find a place with some roommates, and even split between 2 that's a lot on top of everything.

-If, by chance, you're given the blessing of being able to get into some kind of college program and can pay the startup fees, you'll probably have to take out loans. And that's where the real money suck begins. You might be stuck paying off those loans for decades, especially if, like many, you graduate and your degree takes you nowhere, and you end up being a fry cook beside the guy who never went to college because he couldn't afford it.

That was a bunch of rambling, but my TL;DR point is that I don't think it's that people are 'wising up', I just think the financial side of college has become so overwhelming that many people can't manage to do it, and that's why you're seeing that number drop.

*standing ovation*

x2. That was great and highly accurate.

It's not all the university's fault though, people who get degrees in basket weaving are fucking idiots that deserve to be in debt and homeless for being an idiot and choosing a terrible degree. Well, maybe not homeless..

One of my friends graduated with a degree in criminal justice with the hopes he could be in the FBI (seriously), and he worked as a night shift security officer for three months out of college because that was literally the only job he could find. The FBI wants people like accountants (which like you mention, you also need a degree for) or a law-degree, and not criminal justice.

He realized his mistake and immediately went back to school to learn computer programming, and while he was in college he got a paying internship with Microsoft and gets a highly respectable amount of money.

Regardless I think a lot of people don't realize the difference between a trade school and college, and are pressured into going to college instead of going to a career-specific university or even community college where they might still get the education they want without spending tons and tons of money, or even better yet, waiting to see what they want to do instead of immediately jumping straight into college where they might not know what they want to do and don't graduate on time or even still worse, have to take another year.

#41 Posted by xxyetixx (1242 posts) -

Biggest problem with college is most degrees shouldn't require you to take all the bullshit that is suppose to make you more well rounded, (english, maths, etc...) Learn what the job requires and get on with it.

Also having a college degree use to mean something the more people that go out and get degrees just makes that achievment meaningless. Floods the work force and makes it harder to get employment in the feild you are trying to be in.

#42 Edited by theone86 (20555 posts) -

@gamerguru100 said:

@XilePrincess said:

It used to be affordable and worth it to go to college because it could actually get you somewhere in a career. People could work a summer job and pay for their tuition. Now you basically have to give up a kidney or your first born on the black market to pay down your loans.

College is a cash cow. I'm not saying it's useless, because it isn't, but it's becoming a little silly the lengths it's gotten to. For example:

-You need a degree for everything now, even the stuff the uneducated used to dominate. There are courses to teach you how to be a receptionist that are now required by many job openings, as if answering phones and balancing an appointment book is so hard you need a college degree to do it.

-Degrees for aforementioned "do you really need a degree for that?" jobs cost a ton of money, even through community college. Nothing is cheap. In my city here in Canada, for a school to teach you how to type and quiz you on some basic medical or legal terms (whether you're becoming a medical office receptionist or a law firm receptionist) it will cost you somewhere in the ballpark of $16,000. Just for a piece of paper to say you can type adequately and know terms you probably already knew from watching Grey's Anatomy and Law and Order.

-People who can't afford the equivalent of a down-payment on a house or the entire cost of a new car to be taught something stupid are pushed back down the ladder. You either find a niche where you can make money (lots of people heading to the oil patches because of that, it requires no education and little experience because it's such hard work) or you sink. The disadvantaged stay disadvantaged. If you can't afford college, you'll be stuck flipping burgers and living with your parents for a long time. That's why so many young people are still at home, because they can't even afford to move out, especially not with the costs of college on their shoulders. They take the charity where they can get it.

-College towns have sickeningly high rent. I live in one, and we get a LOT of rich kids from other countries, so 1k a month for a one-bedroom basement suite or apartment isn't unusual. If you're not a rich kid from somewhere, you're probably just a regular person far enough away from home that they can't stay with family, so they have to find a place with some roommates, and even split between 2 that's a lot on top of everything.

-If, by chance, you're given the blessing of being able to get into some kind of college program and can pay the startup fees, you'll probably have to take out loans. And that's where the real money suck begins. You might be stuck paying off those loans for decades, especially if, like many, you graduate and your degree takes you nowhere, and you end up being a fry cook beside the guy who never went to college because he couldn't afford it.

That was a bunch of rambling, but my TL;DR point is that I don't think it's that people are 'wising up', I just think the financial side of college has become so overwhelming that many people can't manage to do it, and that's why you're seeing that number drop.

*standing ovation*

x2. That was great and highly accurate.

It's not all the university's fault though, people who get degrees in basket weaving are fucking idiots that deserve to be in debt and homeless for being an idiot and choosing a terrible degree. Well, maybe not homeless..

One of my friends graduated with a degree in criminal justice with the hopes he could be in the FBI (seriously), and he worked as a night shift security officer for three months out of college because that was literally the only job he could find. The FBI wants people like accountants (which like you mention, you also need a degree for) or a law-degree, and not criminal justice.

He realized his mistake and immediately went back to school to learn computer programming, and while he was in college he got a paying internship with Microsoft and gets a highly respectable amount of money.

Regardless I think a lot of people don't realize the difference between a trade school and college, and are pressured into going to college instead of going to a career-specific university or even community college where they might still get the education they want without spending tons and tons of money, or even better yet, waiting to see what they want to do instead of immediately jumping straight into college where they might not know what they want to do and don't graduate on time or even still worse, have to take another year.

This attitude is part of the problem, though. Select groups of people go into majors that aren't going to earn them a ton of money, they don't bring a lot of prestige to their college, they certainly don't bring in the sorts of donations that wealthier alumni do, and the college pressures these departments to either market themselves better or fold. This means that departments are now operating according to the paradigm that job marketability is the primary service they're providing, and accordingly charge more. This also means that successful graduates will have paid more for their degree than what it has cost in the past, and therefore will have the added financial responsibility of justifying the cost of their own degrees. Colleges are stuck in this never-ending cycle where prestige justifies cost and cost breeds a demand for more prestige, and prestige is largely determined by recruitment and an institutional focus on generating prestige (read: advertising costs and cutting overhead). Part of the social benefits of colleges in the past have been that they've helped individuals to challenge the dominant paradigms of the past, to turn them into job factories is to rob them and the rest of society of that benefit. If that's now the point of a college degree than I'm going to jump on to loco's bandwagon all the way instead of part way. Don't go to college, save money and improve on your own life instead of relying on a flawed system on the off chance you're going to hit the lottery and end up on top.

#43 Posted by whipassmt (13960 posts) -

Oh come on. In a society that is increasingly based on technology, we need scientists and engineers to be leading the forefront, rather than be depending on foreign countries.

I agree that not everyone should go to college, but there are tech schools and other programs that can provide great training for other very important jobs that don't require a college degree.

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

Are you upset by your college experience?

I wonder, does the statistic mentioned by the tc count the people who go to tech schools and similar programs as going to college or as not going? I would consider it "higher education".

Although we could still be at the "forefront" on those things even if our own people are not going to college and pursuing them, sometimes a lot of people from overseas who are qualified come over here. I think a lot of doctors from India come to the U.S. to work, although I don't think the U.S. should want to be taking all these doctors and scientists, etc. from overseas and leaving their home countries with a shortage.

#44 Posted by jimkabrhel (15417 posts) -

@jimkabrhel said:

Oh come on. In a society that is increasingly based on technology, we need scientists and engineers to be leading the forefront, rather than be depending on foreign countries.

I agree that not everyone should go to college, but there are tech schools and other programs that can provide great training for other very important jobs that don't require a college degree.

A college degree isn't the golden egg that it once was, but those degrees are still important for many people.

Are you upset by your college experience?

I wonder, does the statistic mentioned by the tc count the people who go to tech schools and similar programs as going to college or as not going? I would consider it "higher education".

Although we could still be at the "forefront" on those things even if our own people are not going to college and pursuing them, sometimes a lot of people from overseas who are qualified come over here. I think a lot of doctors from India come to the U.S. to work, although I don't think the U.S. should want to be taking all these doctors and scientists, etc. from overseas and leaving their home countries with a shortage.

This isn't about the US "taking" these doctors and other educated people from other countries. They often leave to get a better education here, or find a more stable job and better life here.

This issue is that many of those people are getting their education here and returning to their own countries. This should mean more opportunities for educated people from this country to fill those holes. This is happening, but many Americans are now going overseas too.

#45 Edited by whipassmt (13960 posts) -

Hey jim, i'm seeing a notification that you mentioned me, but when I click it or go onto this thread I can't see your post. Maybe once I post this I'll be able to see it.

#46 Edited by whipassmt (13960 posts) -

@jimkabrhel:

Finally I can see you're post. I swear Slade Wilson and Nick Fury could see better things better with a swollen eye than we can see our posts on this site.

#47 Posted by jimkabrhel (15417 posts) -

The forum system is pretty shitty. I've been having trouble too.

#48 Edited by bowchicka07 (1073 posts) -

I'll just assume this thread is trolly; saying college enrollment going down is a good thing? Seriously?

Everyone seems to be taking him seriously but I just can't.