Another oil rig just exploded

This topic is locked from further discussion.

#1 Posted by br0kenrabbit (12686 posts) -

Story

And people wonder why so many are against doing this $hit in environmentally sensitive areas? Really?

#2 Posted by C2N2 (759 posts) -

Everywhere is an evironmentally sensitive area. Which is why I shun domestic drilling.

#3 Posted by KiIIyou (27112 posts) -
I call those explody rigs.
#4 Posted by Nuck81 (5783 posts) -
Well, gas prices were threatening to drop below $3 a gallon. Took care of that.
#5 Posted by Serraph105 (27586 posts) -

Well that sucks. I hope that they are able to clean it up fast, but given that it's winter we don't currently have nature on our side this time.

#6 Posted by airshocker (28347 posts) -

Not really concerned at the moment. We'll see what happens in a few hours, or a day or two from now.

#7 Posted by clyde46 (43685 posts) -
Great, more price increases.
#8 Posted by jeremiah06 (7169 posts) -

Not really concerned at the moment. We'll see what happens in a few hours, or a day or two from now.

airshocker
What the hell? What about the dead and injured?
#9 Posted by Serraph105 (27586 posts) -
[QUOTE="airshocker"]

Not really concerned at the moment. We'll see what happens in a few hours, or a day or two from now.

jeremiah06
What the hell? What about the dead and injured?

it's really all about the economy.....
#10 Posted by Pittfan666 (8532 posts) -
Time to go buy a bunch of gas.
#11 Posted by FrostyPhantasm (8521 posts) -
It really isn't the oil rigs that are failing, it's 100% the people working on them, some worker on those bad boys always do something really stupid and ruin the whole process.
#12 Posted by General_X (9023 posts) -
It does not appear the incident could lead to a major environmental disaster, Coast Guard Capt. Peter Gautier said.Article
Well it's sad for the people hurt or injured, but at least it doesn't appear that we'll have another BP disaster.
#13 Posted by Ballroompirate (21783 posts) -

It really isn't the oil rigs that are failing, it's 100% the people working on them, some worker on those bad boys always do something really stupid and ruin the whole process. FrostyPhantasm

Not really, as someone who worked in the oilfields in Wyoming it's usually poor equipment and the 14-20 hour work days that causes accidents.

#14 Posted by Storm_Marine (10766 posts) -

Everywhere is an evironmentally sensitive area. Which is why I shun domestic drilling.

C2N2

there is a slight irony to this

#15 Posted by Storm_Marine (10766 posts) -

Oil rigs are dangerous places. It's why the workers on them make so much money.

#16 Posted by megam (457 posts) -
I'll wait to see what happens, but it doesn't look like a major environmental disaster will ensue. Right now, it sounds like the maintenance worker who cut into a line made a mistake. Whether or not that's the truth, we'll find out in the coming days. I can only hope the workers are found, and I wish them all full and speedy recoveries.
#17 Posted by FrostyPhantasm (8521 posts) -

[QUOTE="FrostyPhantasm"]It really isn't the oil rigs that are failing, it's 100% the people working on them, some worker on those bad boys always do something really stupid and ruin the whole process. Ballroompirate

Not really, as someone who worked in the oilfields in Wyoming it's usually poor equipment and the 14-20 hour work days that causes accidents.

As someone who currently works in the oilfields in Canada, i've noticed 95% of the accidents are man-made from compliance or lack of proper duties/maintenance.
#18 Posted by Sphensen (708 posts) -

Oil spills are tragic. look up trash island and you will see what man has really done to the environment

#19 Posted by Ballroompirate (21783 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ballroompirate"]

[QUOTE="FrostyPhantasm"]It really isn't the oil rigs that are failing, it's 100% the people working on them, some worker on those bad boys always do something really stupid and ruin the whole process. FrostyPhantasm

Not really, as someone who worked in the oilfields in Wyoming it's usually poor equipment and the 14-20 hour work days that causes accidents.

As someone who currently works in the oilfields in Canada, i've noticed 95% of the accidents are man-made from compliance or lack of proper duties/maintenance.

It's a dangerous job, some mistakes are human made whether it's their fault or not, I had 14-15 hour shifts (nights) and I was popping caffeine pills and drinking red bulls for a few months (bad idea btw). With tools and such get worn down so fast most of the time combine that with long shifts it's a bad combination of epic proportions. I've witness a few rig blowouts and one was even less than 40 yards away from me (that was scary ***** seeing guys jump off a work over rig, luckily they had harnesses). I was so scared of going around the cam locks for some of our stuff cause they got so worn down, one even exploded.

Even lost a good friend up there while I was working, he was a trucker though.I feel for all the roughnecks out there, it's dirty and dangerous work, it's very hard to keep your "A game" every moment out there, specially the night crew.

#20 Posted by airshocker (28347 posts) -

What the hell? What about the dead and injured?jeremiah06

Was talking about with regards to the environmental impact, you sanctimonious dunderhead.

#21 Posted by Nibroc420 (13567 posts) -
explosion occurred when maintenance workers using a torch cut into a pipe with oil inside. Where do these people get certified??
#22 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

Well, gas prices were threatening to drop below $3 a gallon. Took care of that.Nuck81

What are you talking about. Prices in South Carolina alont I-85 were already under $3. I saw several at $2.92.9 a gallon this past Sunday on my way back from VA.

#23 Posted by Ballroompirate (21783 posts) -

explosion occurred when maintenance workers using a torch cut into a pipe with oil inside. Where do these people get certified??Nibroc420

It is actually pretty hard to clear out oil in a line, there will always be oil traces in a line if you just "blow out a line". Only real way is if the line was big enough to physically have a person inside cleaning it.

#24 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

[QUOTE="Nibroc420"]explosion occurred when maintenance workers using a torch cut into a pipe with oil inside. Where do these people get certified??Ballroompirate

It is actually pretty hard to clear out oil in a line, there will always be oil traces in a line if you just "blow out a line". Only real way is if the line was big enough to physically have a person inside cleaning it.

Nitrogen purges work wonders.

#25 Posted by dave123321 (33415 posts) -

[QUOTE="Nuck81"]Well, gas prices were threatening to drop below $3 a gallon. Took care of that.WhiteKnight77

What are you talking about. Prices in South Carolina alont I-85 were already under $3. I saw several at $2.92.9 a gallon this past Sunday on my way back from VA.

Not everyone knows everything
#26 Posted by dave123321 (33415 posts) -
Sorry for singling you out
#27 Posted by FrostyPhantasm (8521 posts) -

[QUOTE="FrostyPhantasm"][QUOTE="Ballroompirate"]

Not really, as someone who worked in the oilfields in Wyoming it's usually poor equipment and the 14-20 hour work days that causes accidents.

Ballroompirate

As someone who currently works in the oilfields in Canada, i've noticed 95% of the accidents are man-made from compliance or lack of proper duties/maintenance.

It's a dangerous job, some mistakes are human made whether it's their fault or not, I had 14-15 hour shifts (nights) and I was popping caffeine pills and drinking red bulls for a few months (bad idea btw). With tools and such get worn down so fast most of the time combine that with long shifts it's a bad combination of epic proportions. I've witness a few rig blowouts and one was even less than 40 yards away from me (that was scary ***** seeing guys jump off a work over rig, luckily they had harnesses). I was so scared of going around the cam locks for some of our stuff cause they got so worn down, one even exploded.

Even lost a good friend up there while I was working, he was a trucker though.I feel for all the roughnecks out there, it's dirty and dangerous work, it's very hard to keep your "A game" every moment out there, specially the night crew.

Fair enough, i do agree that shift work needs to be evaluated and people need at least a small nap time or something in all honesty. Also contractors need to be brought more up to speed on what kind of plant they are working in and how it operates because i've seen so many that are completely oblivious to the dangers around them. At the same time, building maintenance should be top priority among the plant operators, planners and mechanics departments. Even small things should be reported so they can be looked at, and it's lack of that which causes blow outs, explosions, implosions, leaks and the such except for in extreme cases.
#28 Posted by br0kenrabbit (12686 posts) -

It's a dangerous job, some mistakes are human made whether it's their fault or not, I had 14-15 hour shifts (nights) and I was popping caffeine pills and drinking red bulls for a few months (bad idea btw). With tools and such get worn down so fast most of the time combine that with long shifts it's a bad combination of epic proportions.

Ballroompirate

Of all the industries in the world, the oil industry can afford to hire an appropriate number of workers. Greedy fvcks.

#29 Posted by Storm_Marine (10766 posts) -

[QUOTE="Ballroompirate"]

It's a dangerous job, some mistakes are human made whether it's their fault or not, I had 14-15 hour shifts (nights) and I was popping caffeine pills and drinking red bulls for a few months (bad idea btw). With tools and such get worn down so fast most of the time combine that with long shifts it's a bad combination of epic proportions.

br0kenrabbit

Of all the industries in the world, the oil industry can afford to hire an appropriate number of workers. Greedy fvcks.

The industry, (at least in Canada and the other places I've worked) has huge manpower shortages and is also one of the highest paying. This has nothing to do with "corporate greed".

#30 Posted by mariokart64fan (19348 posts) -

who in their right mind uses a torch around gas lines /oil rigs

im not letting them check my gas heater lol

#31 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

who in their right mind uses a torch around gas lines /oil rigs

im not letting them check my gas heater lol

mariokart64fan

How else do you expect workers to cut out and replace parts of a pipeline made from steel? It's all part of working on pipelines and other associated parts of a rig or refinery. Just about everything is welded together (and that creates sparks in and of itself) and you have to use an oxy/acetelyene cutting torch to seperate it if a part needs replacing.

#32 Posted by shadowkiller11 (7948 posts) -
I call those explody rigs.KiIIyou
Such wisdom. Such knowledge.
#33 Posted by Ballroompirate (21783 posts) -

[QUOTE="br0kenrabbit"]

[QUOTE="Ballroompirate"]

It's a dangerous job, some mistakes are human made whether it's their fault or not, I had 14-15 hour shifts (nights) and I was popping caffeine pills and drinking red bulls for a few months (bad idea btw). With tools and such get worn down so fast most of the time combine that with long shifts it's a bad combination of epic proportions.

Storm_Marine

Of all the industries in the world, the oil industry can afford to hire an appropriate number of workers. Greedy fvcks.

The industry, (at least in Canada and the other places I've worked) has huge manpower shortages and is also one of the highest paying. This has nothing to do with "corporate greed".

Yes the oil industry can afford it but most of the work is done by other contractors (specially land based oiling), which a lot of them screw over their employees in a lot of ways. I was getting payed $16 an hour compared to other contract employees who were getting $33-$45 an hour.

Even here in the states some places are in huge demand for employment while other places it's at a slow stand still. A lot of contractors like Halliburton require at least 7 years experience, that's kind of a high asking price since working in the oil business is a tough job to stay in for over 2 years cause the strain that goes against you is insane

#34 Posted by FrostyPhantasm (8521 posts) -

[QUOTE="Storm_Marine"]

[QUOTE="br0kenrabbit"]

Of all the industries in the world, the oil industry can afford to hire an appropriate number of workers. Greedy fvcks.

Ballroompirate

The industry, (at least in Canada and the other places I've worked) has huge manpower shortages and is also one of the highest paying. This has nothing to do with "corporate greed".

Yes the oil industry can afford it but most of the work is done by other contractors (specially land based oiling), which a lot of them screw over their employees in a lot of ways. I was getting payed $16 an hour compared to other contract employees who were getting $33-$45 an hour.

Even here in the states some places are in huge demand for employment while other places it's at a slow stand still. A lot of contractors like Halliburton require at least 7 years experience, that's kind of a high asking price since working in the oil business is a tough job to stay in for over 2 years cause the strain that goes against you is insane

The contractors here get paid around $35 while my coworkers range from 50-70$ and once the major work is done, the contractors are out of the job and have to go somewhere else to get more work.
#35 Posted by GamerZem (539 posts) -

Not really concerned at the moment. We'll see what happens in a few hours, or a day or two from now.

airshocker

.

spider-meme-8.jpg

#36 Posted by gamerguru100 (10403 posts) -
[QUOTE="airshocker"]

Not really concerned at the moment. We'll see what happens in a few hours, or a day or two from now.

jeremiah06
What the hell? What about the dead and injured?

People die everyday, man. It's just the sad fact of life.