13 Skills Your Grandparents Had That You Don’t

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#51 Posted by XenoLair (4755 posts) -

What an incredibly dull and utterly useless list.

#52 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -
#53 Posted by The_Gaming_Baby (6335 posts) -

Oh well. They were a product of their environment, and I am a product of mine

#54 Posted by foxhound_fox (87327 posts) -

Have:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 (I can socialize, but I dislike large groups), 12

Could easily learn:

7, 10 (beyond a backyard garden), 13 (I don't like to dance and have never learned)

#55 Posted by GamingTitan (505 posts) -

I can and do all of those things on a regular basis.

I can't dance though. Never learned.

#56 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

@WhiteKnight77: point being that the livestock and crops thing is like the only one that I think most people under the age of 30 would have trouble with. And even at that it's probs less of a age thing and just a skill that a lot of people probes don't have no matter if you 80 or 8.

It just seems like an poor list is all.

Explain all the girl help threads on OT that have been a staple since i don't know when if people know how to socialize. When I go out, I always see groups with their face in their phones instead of talking with each other. And yes, there is more to talk about than the weather, school or whatnot.

People don't know how to change a tire or read a map? Seriously?

Yes, I seriously doubt anyone has actively looked to see if they have a spare tire in the trunk, much less insure that it is properly filled with air or how long they are good for or even if they have a jack or know where the lifting point is. Look at how many cars sit by the side of the road on flat tires. All too often in the Atlanta area, people are sitting in their car waiting on a HERO to come by and change it for them instead of doing it themselves. This is especially true of women.

That people cannot read a map is very apparent with cars stuffed with GPSs on the window and turned on even if they are driving around town. People are spending more for a Garmin or TomTom than they would for a map book. The funny thing is, it takes just as long to find a place on a map as it does to plug in an address into a GPS.

#57 Edited by deeliman (2340 posts) -

@dave123321 said:

@WhiteKnight77: point being that the livestock and crops thing is like the only one that I think most people under the age of 30 would have trouble with. And even at that it's probs less of a age thing and just a skill that a lot of people probes don't have no matter if you 80 or 8.

It just seems like an poor list is all.

Explain all the girl help threads on OT that have been a staple since i don't know when if people know how to socialize. When I go out, I always see groups with their face in their phones instead of talking with each other. And yes, there is more to talk about than the weather, school or whatnot.

@chaplainDMK said:

People don't know how to change a tire or read a map? Seriously?

Yes, I seriously doubt anyone has actively looked to see if they have a spare tire in the trunk, much less insure that it is properly filled with air or how long they are good for or even if they have a jack or know where the lifting point is. Look at how many cars sit by the side of the road on flat tires. All too often in the Atlanta area, people are sitting in their car waiting on a HERO to come by and change it for them instead of doing it themselves. This is especially true of women.

That people cannot read a map is very apparent with cars stuffed with GPSs on the window and turned on even if they are driving around town. People are spending more for a Garmin or TomTom than they would for a map book. The funny thing is, it takes just as long to find a place on a map as it does to plug in an address into a GPS.

Using GPS is just more convenient, that doesn't mean they can't read a map. Also it takes longer to use a map in certain cases. For example, if I wanted to go to a hotel in Rome for the holidays, it would be faster to type the address of that hotel in my tomtom than it would be to use a map.

#58 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

I have a more complete perspective of how my age group acts.

#59 Posted by deeliman (2340 posts) -

I have a more complete perspective of how my age group acts.

What is your age group?

#60 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

Also get over the fact that maps are obsolete for certain uses. Just because they are not being used doesn't mean they aren't able to use them. It's like a phonebook. You are making it seem like using a map is so damn hard that the young ins can't use it.

Now granted, there are some that will fall into some of the stuff on the list. But you just seem to have this really ignorant base of knowledge where you seem to think that they apply to just about everyone.

#61 Edited by GreySeal9 (23974 posts) -

What a dumb list. The "being creative" item was especially silly. Actually, most of the "creative" people I know are fairly young.

#62 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

@deeliman: what ever group that the mid 20ers are part of

#63 Edited by GreySeal9 (23974 posts) -

@dave123321 said:

Hope the tc intended this to be a laugh at the shitty list thread

Knowing WhiteKnight77's usual condescending (and slightly embarrassing) "you young whippersnappers!" attitude, I wouldn't at all be surprised if he means us to take it seriously.

#64 Posted by HoolaHoopMan (7719 posts) -

Oh look a Buzzfeed list. Haven't seen one of these before.

#65 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

I just hope that given the average age of the users in this thread and the response that the list has gotten here makes the tc realize that perhaps he is off base with his mostly outside perspective.

#66 Edited by GreySeal9 (23974 posts) -

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@dave123321 said:

@WhiteKnight77: point being that the livestock and crops thing is like the only one that I think most people under the age of 30 would have trouble with. And even at that it's probs less of a age thing and just a skill that a lot of people probes don't have no matter if you 80 or 8.

It just seems like an poor list is all.

Explain all the girl help threads on OT that have been a staple since i don't know when if people know how to socialize. When I go out, I always see groups with their face in their phones instead of talking with each other. And yes, there is more to talk about than the weather, school or whatnot.

lol at you thinking that somehow girl help threads on a video game forum with maybe a hundred something regular users (if we're being generous) is at all representative of the younger generation in general. Perhaps you should think about the points you're making before hitting the submit button.

Also, if you think that all people do is mess around on their phones and don't talk to each other, you simply haven't gotten out much.

#67 Edited by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

Greyseal speaks the truth

#68 Posted by AmazonTreeBoa (16747 posts) -

Maybe it is my age, but I have all those skills. Well except the dancing. But I can't dance at all, so...

#69 Edited by MrGeezer (56016 posts) -

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

#70 Edited by chaplainDMK (6667 posts) -

@dave123321 said:

@WhiteKnight77: point being that the livestock and crops thing is like the only one that I think most people under the age of 30 would have trouble with. And even at that it's probs less of a age thing and just a skill that a lot of people probes don't have no matter if you 80 or 8.

It just seems like an poor list is all.

Explain all the girl help threads on OT that have been a staple since i don't know when if people know how to socialize. When I go out, I always see groups with their face in their phones instead of talking with each other. And yes, there is more to talk about than the weather, school or whatnot.

@chaplainDMK said:

People don't know how to change a tire or read a map? Seriously?

Yes, I seriously doubt anyone has actively looked to see if they have a spare tire in the trunk, much less insure that it is properly filled with air or how long they are good for or even if they have a jack or know where the lifting point is. Look at how many cars sit by the side of the road on flat tires. All too often in the Atlanta area, people are sitting in their car waiting on a HERO to come by and change it for them instead of doing it themselves. This is especially true of women.

That people cannot read a map is very apparent with cars stuffed with GPSs on the window and turned on even if they are driving around town. People are spending more for a Garmin or TomTom than they would for a map book. The funny thing is, it takes just as long to find a place on a map as it does to plug in an address into a GPS.

I mean changing a tire isn't rocket science, even if you never did it before you can figure it out quickly. You have a lifting jack and the wrench in the tool set with the spare tire, or if you have a new fancier car you probably have a set of gap filler or however is it called and a pump. In any case you probably don't need to call anyone for that.

As for the map, there's no excuses. If someone can't orient themselves on a map they should be pronounced clinically brain dead.

#71 Posted by the_ChEeSe_mAn2 (8464 posts) -

I can do a majority of those things. Change a tired? I don't have a car so I wouldn't know how (not yet at least).

Tie many knots? Why?

Raising crops/lifestock? I've been on my grandmother's farm twice in my life. So no I never had the need to.

Memorizing phone numbers? Why? If I got multiple tools to look up phone numbers, I don't see the need to remember more than 2.

Only ones I admittedly would have real trouble (that I should know how to do) doing is sewing a button (lack of experience) and home maintenance (again. not enough experience.

Rest is fairly straightforward to me.

#72 Posted by tocool340 (20447 posts) -

The only things I don't know how to do on that list are tying the many variant forms of knots and sewing...

#73 Posted by comp_atkins (31180 posts) -

@xdude85 said:

That article is what I like to call bullshit wrapped in crap.

well, look where it came from...

#74 Posted by XVision84 (13626 posts) -

Lol this article is terrible, pretty much designed to get hits off of making fun of the current generation of youth. Not like we haven't seen that before.

#75 Posted by -TheSecondSign- (9179 posts) -

Knew it was bullshit the second I saw Buzzfeed.

None of these are difficult except maintaining crops and I seriously doubt every old person knows how to do that.

My grandparents don't know shit about crops. None of the old people I know do. Because they live in a fucking city.

This article is stupid.

#76 Posted by caseystryker (5405 posts) -

Well, I can do everything on that list besides raise crops because guess what, I'm not a farmer. None of the old people I know were either. Pretty stupid list.

#77 Posted by Shottayouth13- (6721 posts) -

I wrote like crap (or so they say) long before the computing revolution came about.

And I can do most of the things on that list. For the stuff that I can't, I haven't been in a situation that required me to do them.

#78 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

#79 Edited by deeliman (2340 posts) -

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

#80 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

One or two of those flashlights will go back into my work bags. I lived through the Cold War and I also know that there are entities that are wanting to do everything they can to remove the US from the face of the planet though if that happens, more will also disappear from the Earth too. Nuclear destruction still can happen even today. Hard to say what will happen after I am dead and buried.

#81 Posted by deeliman (2340 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

One or two of those flashlights will go back into my work bags. I lived through the Cold War and I also know that there are entities that are wanting to do everything they can to remove the US from the face of the planet though if that happens, more will also disappear from the Earth too. Nuclear destruction still can happen even today. Hard to say what will happen after I am dead and buried.

Wouldn't worry about it. You need multiple nukes to get through the anti ballistic missile shield of the US, and the only entities that are capable of doing so are afraid of retaliation.

Don't you guys still have a lot of bunkers left from the cold war though? Couldn't you just stay in there?

#82 Edited by Nibroc420 (13567 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

One or two of those flashlights will go back into my work bags. I lived through the Cold War and I also know that there are entities that are wanting to do everything they can to remove the US from the face of the planet though if that happens, more will also disappear from the Earth too. Nuclear destruction still can happen even today. Hard to say what will happen after I am dead and buried.

Wouldn't worry about it. You need multiple nukes to get through the anti ballistic missile shield of the US, and the only entities that are capable of doing so are afraid of retaliation.

Don't you guys still have a lot of bunkers left from the cold war though? Couldn't you just stay in there?

Vault-Tec is great.

#83 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

One or two of those flashlights will go back into my work bags. I lived through the Cold War and I also know that there are entities that are wanting to do everything they can to remove the US from the face of the planet though if that happens, more will also disappear from the Earth too. Nuclear destruction still can happen even today. Hard to say what will happen after I am dead and buried.

Wouldn't worry about it. You need multiple nukes to get through the anti ballistic missile shield of the US, and the only entities that are capable of doing so are afraid of retaliation.

Don't you guys still have a lot of bunkers left from the cold war though? Couldn't you just stay in there?

It does not have to be nukes. Look at the damage done when a hurricane, tornado or even bad winter storms come through. Power can be lost for days or worse, weeks. Even if your home isn't damaged and still livable, you will not be charging your phone to use that app.

Also, who said anything about using a ballistic missile against the US. Nukes could be brought in other ways.

#84 Posted by deeliman (2340 posts) -

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@deeliman said:

@WhiteKnight77 said:

@MrGeezer said:

I'll admit that the list is crappy, but I think there's a point to be had here. That in many cases "doing" is being phased out in favour of "buying something (like an app) that does that for you." It's not gonna be an overnight thing, but at least from my perspective in the USA, there is a BIG shift towards "why bother making it when you can just buy what other people make."That's not inherently bad. As someone else noticed, our granparents didn't have anything remotely like modern cell phones. It's just a tool, and they're useful enough to have been embraced by both the young and old.

But making and selling go hand in hand. That is, in the sense that comparisons are f***ing important. In many cases, if people could MAKE, then they'd have a point of reference, something to compare to. They could be told to buy a $hitty product and then say "I know that's $hit, because I make it myself. And this is worse than what I would do. F*** you, I'm not giving you my money, I'm better off making it myself.

I'm not saying that this is a new thing at all, but I absolutely see things (at least where I live) shifting towards consumerism rather than productivity. Once there's an increased means of getting anything anywhere almost immediately, there is absolutely going to be an inherent shift away from teaching people how to do things themselves. And while the changes involved are not necedssarily bad, that DOES result in information and skills being lost. The list was bad, but the point was totally f***ing valid and is something that people should absolutely f***ing remember.

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

6 different ones seems way overkill. Also, are you really worried someone will nuke the us? Seriously? And Most people will probably die from the fallout, so why bother anyways.

One or two of those flashlights will go back into my work bags. I lived through the Cold War and I also know that there are entities that are wanting to do everything they can to remove the US from the face of the planet though if that happens, more will also disappear from the Earth too. Nuclear destruction still can happen even today. Hard to say what will happen after I am dead and buried.

Wouldn't worry about it. You need multiple nukes to get through the anti ballistic missile shield of the US, and the only entities that are capable of doing so are afraid of retaliation.

Don't you guys still have a lot of bunkers left from the cold war though? Couldn't you just stay in there?

It does not have to be nukes. Look at the damage done when a hurricane, tornado or even bad winter storms come through. Power can be lost for days or worse, weeks. Even if your home isn't damaged and still livable, you will not be charging your phone to use that app.

Also, who said anything about using a ballistic missile against the US. Nukes could be brought in other ways.

If you live in an area where natural disasters happen then yes, it makes sense to always be prepared. And ICBM's are probably the only viable way to nuke the us for terrorist organisations, and if it's a country than they simply won't do it, because they're afraid of retaliation.

#85 Edited by theone86 (20555 posts) -

I can do everything on the list. Well, I can't dance at all, if that affects number 13, but everything else I have some proficiency at. I also know how to get down off a high horse, so I guess I'm one up on TC.

#86 Edited by comp_atkins (31180 posts) -

one could just as easily name 13 skills they have that their grandparents do not. or 13 skills their grandparent's grandparents had that their grandparents did not have. the point? this is a stupid list.

#87 Posted by MrGeezer (56016 posts) -

I think you are onto something there. People download apps to their smartphones all the time and many people download a flashlight app to use the LEDs used for a flash as their flashlight, but how many of them actually own a real flashlight. What would those very people do if the power went out and their phone died and they cannot recharge it? I have 6 different flashlights in my living room alone even though I too have an app for that yet I still own probably a dozen flashlights total with batteries for all of them.

As far as growing things, yes, I can grow things (I am currently growing oregano, basil and thyme). I can feed myself if I need to (I love to fish) so I will not go hungry. How many on OT either hunt or fish instead of just going to the grocery store or fast food joint? People are willing to say that they will just go buy what they need, but fail to look at it from a different way. We in the US still have to worry about a nuke being used on our soil even though the Cold War is over. What happens when the EMP shuts down the electrical grid? What are people going to do for sustenance once the stuff in their refrigerators spoil and the supermarket shelves are empty? No one thinks about what ifs. Will what ifs happen? No one can answer that in either the affirmative or negative. Knowing how to do things in a basic way is always an important knowledge.

Just taking the flashlights as an example: I'm not necessarily even against stuff like that. I mean, hey...I understand the appeal. If I can have a flashlight app in my phone instead of having to carry around a separate flashlight, then that saves space. It's a bonus.

However, here's the thing...if someone has spent their entire life using flashlight apps, and has never used a real flashlight, then all point of comparison is sort of lost. They're not gonna be in any position to judge the benefits and weaknesses of the flashlight app, because they've got nothing to compare it to. Maybe it's better and maybe it's worse, but how the hell are they gonna know? In certain cases, this can actually result in mediocrity becoming the norm.

So yeah, change is gonna happen. Some useful skills die over time and then people suffer for it, meanwhile there are always new skills getting recognition that our grandparents would have been ecstatic to have had access to. Some stuff gets better and some stuff gets worse, I'm not one of those people who bashes change. I just think people should pay attention to WHICH skills and abilities are being phased out, and then sort of ask if that's really a skill which is no longer relevant.

#89 Edited by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

Tcs flashlight example is one of the examples of his lost grip on reality

#90 Posted by Detroit222 (5279 posts) -

I can do it all except:

1. auto maintenance - cars were a lot easier to repair 'back in the day'. Nowadays you need a master's degree in electronics.

2. killing farm animals - this is rather silly. Even 'back in the day' how many people kept and killed their own farm animals in the city? I do take care of my pets and keep them fed and from harm. I also grow flowers and vegetables.

3. home maintenance - I know how to change the furnace filter, trip the fuses when they go off, change a light bulb, paint a room. Everything else I leave to professionals.

#91 Posted by WhiteKnight77 (12018 posts) -

Tcs flashlight example is one of the examples of his lost grip on reality

Is that so Dave? Maybe you will be lucky and never need a flashlight, then again, you may and due to not having at least one, you stumble around in the dark when you really need one due to your phone not being charged.

#92 Edited by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

I have a few flashlights all set plus extra batteries.

#93 Posted by dave123321 (33569 posts) -

I can grow stuff but I see that as having a pet compared to raising livestock in relation to crop growing