Why are some parents so against gaming?

#1 Edited by crazyman158 (49 posts) -

My mom absolutely hates that i play video games, and hates video games in general. But it makes me wonder, why do parents hate gaming? Now i know for sure i don't have the only mom (i don't have a dad but for you it could just both of your parents) in the world that hates gaming. It frustrates me how some parents think gaming is such a bad thing, but its not. And i will admit, i probably play video games way too much.

But the thing is, I don't act like a die hard no life gamer, and don't show the negative side effects of gaming. I'm a very smart kid (i just ended the grading period on high honor roll and I'm in the National Juniors Honor Society). On top of that I'm one of those kids that understand life very well for my age (I'm 14). Anyway back to the main topic. It boggles my mind how some parents are so against there kid playing video games.

Like i said before i always play video games. And I'm not one of those kids who sits at a tv scream and yells out "HACKER!" every time i get killed in COD (i don't even play COD now but i did when i was like 10 and still didn't yell at the screen and other things the childish kids do). I play games like CIV 5, Crusader Kings 2, Europa Universalis IV, Payday 2, and Arma 3. Now this doesn't apply to Payday 2, but these games can be pretty fucking hard to learn.

If you know these games you know you can't just turn on Crusader Kings 2 and start playing it. A little squeaker from COD wouldn't last 5 seconds in Arma 3. So really it's not like I physically annoy my family with yelling at screens or abruptly smashing buttons; I'm as quiet as a mouse when I play games. I mean i play them though because I have nothing else to do. It's been a long as 7 month winter.

Not like im going to go outside or anything. And even if it was warm outside it's not like I would have anything to do as all the kids in my neighborhood are either too young, too old, or have a totally different life style than me (and I'm NOT referring to them no liking gaming its very many other things too). When my mom asks me to do something i always do it also. I listen to my mom and do anything she asks me to. But apparently that's not enough for her to stop bitching at me to do something. Like i said before I play video games any chance i get. Which is practically right after school till about 10:30. But i play sports. I do wrestling, track, and football. (I'm very good at all 3 of them).

I don't it just gets very annoying how my mom won't leave me alone about it.

#2 Edited by ZZoMBiE13 (22911 posts) -

I never understood a parent who didn't embrace the hobby.

My parents were always supportive of my decision to spend time gaming. When I was young, they bought me an Atari. When I was in high school, I asked for a NES and they were happy to see me happy. I brought my friends over to play, played games in the arcade, and they'd often plunk a quarter in a Pac-Man machine and be my player 2 when I was first finding the hobby.

When I got older and had my own kid, gaming was often a bonding activity between my daughter and I. It still is.

I mean it just seems like such a silly thing to be bothered by. If a kid were a racist or a bully, that's when a parent should be upset. But a gamer? That's just not something I can't see how anyone has a problem with. I mean MAYBE if all your kid liked were hyper-violent games and to the detriment of all other activities it could be cause for alarm. But even then it's not worth dismissing the entire hobby over.

#3 Posted by hippiesanta (9884 posts) -

Most parents are douchey ..... and douchebags cant accept if their son or daughter are nerds (or they think gamers are all nerdy).

Parents want to see their children grow up becoming like Oprah or Larry King

#4 Posted by contracts420 (1956 posts) -

Most parents have this idea that it rots your brain, call them old fashioned. My parents were always happy to see me play video games as it was the only thing that kept me out of trouble. If I was out... I was most likely getting into fights or doing drugs or staying out late doing something else I shouldn't have been. Once I was released from jail and put on house arrest for 6 months gaming became my home away from home. It kept me from leaving and causing myself and others harm.

It helped me quit drinking when I was an alcoholic and it helped me realise my one true passion... gaming. I'd rather play games at home safe and sound than let myself become something else. Now I have a girlfriend, no drugs, I play games, have a job and I want to go back to school and finish up. Heck... I'd say gaming saved my life.

#5 Edited by Shmiity (5145 posts) -

There is a misconception that it rots your brain/is mind numbing, ect. It's all false. Video games are a billion dollar industry, and its about time all of you ass hole parents woke up and accepted them.

#6 Edited by outworld222 (2429 posts) -

Ignorance. That and the fact that having them never played real video games in their childhood means they understand next to nothing about it.

It's like me explaining quantum physics to a quantum physics professor.

#7 Posted by c_rakestraw (14712 posts) -

Same reason why some think watching too much television is bad for you. Could also be that they simply want their kids to be a more rounded individual by expanding their interests and not spending all day everyday in front of the TV playing videogames. In that case, I understand some of the opposition to it. Devoting your entire life to videogames alone is maybe not the best idea, after all. But if it's outright hatred for them for no good reason, then I don't get it either. They're no more harmful than any other form of entertainment. They're perfectly healthy in moderation, just like everything else in life.

I never had to worry about any of that growing up. My parents have always been fine with me playing games. They've always supported it however they could, never seeing it as a problem or detrimental toward my growth. Hell, they're the ones who suggested I start writing about them in the first place. Glad they did, too. Might not have ended up finding my true calling as a writer otherwise.

#8 Edited by jun_aka_pekto (16318 posts) -

I don't see any mention of you doing homework. Try to look like a bookworm right after getting home from school (finish your homework). Get your folks involved. They'll back off if they can't handle it. Then play video games.

And yes. I am an asshole if I see my kids' school grades suffering and they're just playing games. If they can keep their grades within my standards (no lower than a B), then they can game all they want....and they usually do.

#9 Posted by The_Last_Ride (72255 posts) -

@crazyman158: i had very understanding parents. They let me game as much as i wanted on my SNES and N64 as long as it didn't interfere with my grades and other activites like sports. You just have to educate her. Gaming is new, people are just ignorant. Like they were on music in the 90's like Rap and Rock for example

#11 Posted by Netret0120 (2197 posts) -

It's society dictating what is good and bad that makes them like that.

If i was a parent I would be happier to know my kid is in their room playing video games rather than out at parties getting sloshed every weekend.

It only becomes a problem when your child becomes antisocial but that is a parent's job to make sure that does not happen. I would play games with my kid and show an interest in their hobby and hopefully that rubs off on the kid too to be social with his friends.

#12 Posted by wiouds (5254 posts) -

Too much game is unhealthy and they need to get out and play and be kids in an structured setting.

#13 Posted by Randolph (10542 posts) -

@wiouds said:

Too much game is unhealthy and they need to get out and play and be kids in an structured setting.

Too much ANYTHING is unhealthy.

I never understood why so many of the adults in my family would march into the room and tell us to turn off the game system and go outside and do something "productive", then go back to the living room and slide back onto the couch and zone out in front of the TV for five plus hours. They tried to change me, I knew what I liked and I pursued it against their baseless ignorance, and all it did was drive wedges between us. They could have stopped being ignorant and just, oh I don't know, picked up a goddamn controller and tried to use it as a bonding experience?

My Grandmother of all people was the only to ever even try, she was terrible, but we had fun. She's an angel, and despite her age, she got it. The better chunk of this is just old people not liking something they don't understand/something that is different. As we get older and have more kids of our own, this will become less common.

#14 Posted by Blabadon (26562 posts) -

False stigmas and how, on its own, it doesn't seem to have any benefit for the uninitiated.

#15 Posted by 1PMrFister (3134 posts) -

@Randolph said:

@wiouds said:

Too much game is unhealthy and they need to get out and play and be kids in an structured setting.

Too much ANYTHING is unhealthy.

I never understood why so many of the adults in my family would march into the room and tell us to turn off the game system and go outside and do something "productive", then go back to the living room and slide back onto the couch and zone out in front of the TV for five plus hours. They tried to change me, I knew what I liked and I pursued it against their baseless ignorance, and all it did was drive wedges between us. They could have stopped being ignorant and just, oh I don't know, picked up a goddamn controller and tried to use it as a bonding experience?

My Grandmother of all people was the only to ever even try, she was terrible, but we had fun. She's an angel, and despite her age, she got it. The better chunk of this is just old people not liking something they don't understand/something that is different. As we get older and have more kids of our own, this will become less common.

This is true, although you have to wonder if one day some of us will end up doing the same exact thing our parents did, i.e. forcing our kids away from some new unknown entertainment medium that we have no idea what it could do to them.

#16 Edited by Treflis (11572 posts) -

Same reason their parents were so against Rock, Disco music and action movies like Lethal Weapon.

Same reason their parents again were against Jazz music and movies overall.

Generation Gap tends to play into effect along with lack of information and their own conviction that their days were better. Give it some years and we'll be in the same shoes.

#17 Posted by crazyman158 (49 posts) -

@jun_aka_pekto: I haven't ever gotten a C in my life and im in 7th grade

#18 Posted by geniobastardo (1294 posts) -

@crazyman158: Cuz they don't know games.

#19 Posted by turtlethetaffer (16788 posts) -

They'd rather have their kids do more productive things, like watch Teen Mom.

#20 Edited by jun_aka_pekto (16318 posts) -

@crazyman158 said:

@jun_aka_pekto: I haven't ever gotten a C in my life and im in 7th grade

I can't really gauge your parents without having seen or known them. I understand the winter part when you're stuck indoors. You should find out what your mom expect you to be doing outside of chores when you're stuck indoors. Also, what do your parents do outside of housework? Do they have any hobbies and other leisure activities? If they have their own indulgences, then I don't see why they can't let you have yours unless they're the rural, puritanical types who see any hobby as a waste of time. If they're the latter types, then there's not much you can do except wait it out until you're old enough to move out. My parents were sort of the same. I put up with it because they went through WW2 and know what real hardship is. I just waited until I was able to go out on my own. Once I moved out, they stopped grumbling about my hobbies even when I visited them and played games.

I'm usually strict when I notice deficiencies such as poor grades or getting in trouble. But, once I've done corrective action and I feel my kids are on the right path again, they get their privileges back (until they mess up again). Kind of a balancing act and I always keep an eye for bad trends. But, I also understand the need for kids to have their leisure time. Kids get burned out too.

Most parents I know and who I'm friends with are like me. We give some leeway to our kids and we compare notes sometimes. We've seen parents who are like yours and stricter. Well, we can't really tell other parents how to raise their kids.

#22 Posted by MasterTankallex (94 posts) -

It seems that many parents want their children to go out and have similar experiences that they themselves had as children. What those parents don't understand is that the world is a LOT different than when they were kids. Kids can't go play unsupervised as easily anymore due to things like gang violence, pedophiles/kidnappers, places that are safe or fun for kids to play are being shut down due to lack of funding, and most of their friends that COULD be outside playing football with them would rather stay in and play videogames.

#23 Edited by hrt_rulz01 (6205 posts) -

@outworld222 said:

Ignorance. That and the fact that having them never played real video games in their childhood means they understand next to nothing about it.

It's like me explaining quantum physics to a quantum physics professor.

Yeah exactly. My dad thinks I need to "grow up" and stop playing games... He has no idea what gaming is nowadays. He thinks it's for kids. But he's just ignorant. I tried to show him some Last of Us last year, but he wasn't interested.

But I don't really care what he thinks anyway. Lol.

#24 Posted by udUbdaWgz1 (631 posts) -

some of these comments are absolutely ridiculous. as a parent myself and passionate gamer there are many reasons why I won't allow my children to spend too much time playing video games (or, other wastes of times, as well) with a heavy emphasis on "TOO MUCH."

there are many other things a child or person, including, myself can do each day we are given on this earth than spend too much of that time playing games.

be realistic and show some thought about your gaming and possible children in your future. we all know when WE spend too much time playing video games. we can laugh about it, but, children must be taught many things in this life and wasting time through too much gaming or whatever is just that, wasting time.

#25 Posted by outworld222 (2429 posts) -

@udubdawgz1 said:

some of these comments are absolutely ridiculous. as a parent myself and passionate gamer there are many reasons why I won't allow my children to spend too much time playing video games (or, other wastes of times, as well) with a heavy emphasis on "TOO MUCH."

there are many other things a child or person, including, myself can do each day we are given on this earth than spend too much of that time playing games.

be realistic and show some thought about your gaming and possible children in your future. we all know when WE spend too much time playing video games. we can laugh about it, but, children must be taught many things in this life and wasting time through too much gaming or whatever is just that, wasting time.

We're not children dude or dudette, we're grown adults in our 20s, 30s, or 40s. And It's not "wasting time" as you claim, Your comment makes you look like the ridiculous one.

I'm not ridiculing you, as I understand where you're coming from, my Mom feels the same exact way about games too.

I know you sad too much time, and I know you said "child, or person", but we're free to give thought to whatever we want. Sure, children must be taught life lessons. Have you looked into how MOST video games teach things? Besides that fact, have you given any THOUGHT as to how video games give children critical thinking skills? From puzzle solving, to many other areas?

I suppose not. What about the countless scientific studied that say a reasonable amount of time gaming is healthy for you? Or do all these things also don't make sense...?

#26 Posted by Minishdriveby (10005 posts) -

@outworld222 said:

@udubdawgz1 said:

some of these comments are absolutely ridiculous. as a parent myself and passionate gamer there are many reasons why I won't allow my children to spend too much time playing video games (or, other wastes of times, as well) with a heavy emphasis on "TOO MUCH."

there are many other things a child or person, including, myself can do each day we are given on this earth than spend too much of that time playing games.

be realistic and show some thought about your gaming and possible children in your future. we all know when WE spend too much time playing video games. we can laugh about it, but, children must be taught many things in this life and wasting time through too much gaming or whatever is just that, wasting time.

We're not children dude or dudette, we're grown adults in our 20s, 30s, or 40s. And It's not "wasting time" as you claim, Your comment makes you look like the ridiculous one.

I'm not ridiculing you, as I understand where you're coming from, my Mom feels the same exact way about games too.

I know you sad too much time, and I know you said "child, or person", but we're free to give thought to whatever we want. Sure, children must be taught life lessons. Have you looked into how MOST video games teach things? Besides that fact, have you given any THOUGHT as to how video games give children critical thinking skills? From puzzle solving, to many other areas?

I suppose not. What about the countless scientific studied that say a reasonable amount of time gaming is healthy for you? Or do all these things also don't make sense...?

There are conflicting studies on the effects of video games. Could I read some of the scientific articles you're citing? Of course there have been correlations with critical thinking skills, and physicians have found benefits of using interactive games for health awareness, but there are have also been negative reported effects such as diminished school performance, depression and aggression (although there are conflicting studies on depression and aggression) when played in excess. Not to mention the board for the DSM-V were discussing whether or not to play video game addiction into the book.

I would have to agree with @udubdawgz1in this situation and @jun_aka_pekto, a reasonable amount of time for a hobby is fine. If they like to play video games then yes I'll be happy playing videogames, even with them, but I would want to expose them to many other things than just video games (as well as a variety of video games); the outdoors, education, books, films, etc. are also important/more important in our society. I want them to be well rounded, and cherish their younger years, instead of having them limit themselves to one thing all day every day and look back on it with possible regret. A lot of young teens in this thread are frustrated and lashing out in angst and I think both the parent and child could be causing that lack of communication. As much as kids don't like to be told to limit themselves, sometimes it's necessary.

#27 Posted by crewe8 (690 posts) -

Sorry if i seem to be the only person to point this out, but you was playing cod at the age of 10 , and cod is a 18 rating ? Though i respect people grow up and mature at different ages, i still think this wrong, games have age limits for a reason.

As people have mentioned people / parents are ignorant when it comes to gaming, gaming nearly always recieves bad press , remember when a few years back it was a " reason " why people murdered or comitted crimes...

It's all about moderation , 3 or 4 hours a night , cant see a problem ,as long as you still have friends, and a social life away from the tv screen.

#28 Edited by udUbdaWgz1 (631 posts) -

@outworld222: some of the comments, however, are juvenile.

I made a very simple point about how video games can be a waste of time when one plays too much, too long, etc. ANY activity that is done "too much" will be to ones own detriment. that shouldn't be a difficult concept to grasp or agree with. I was simply offering a perspective so many on this thread were neglecting.

like I said clearly- I am a gaming enthusiast. I let my children play BECAUSE I think it is a very worthy activity for them to do for a variety of reasons. but, to think that total play time should not be a huge consideration is ridiculous, especially, for younger children/adults.

#29 Edited by GiantAssPanda (1606 posts) -

Because there are tons of better, more productive hobbies than gaming. It's fun as hell but it doesn't exactly improve you or your skills. Imagine spending the time you spend on gaming learning to play the guitar or doing bench presses and deadlifts at the gym. Which will be more productive? Also, there's always the chance of ultraviolent games messing your psyche at a young age, especially if you play excessively. How much proly depends on the person.

So yeah. At the end of the day, gaming is kinda lousy hobby. But oh so addicting..

#30 Posted by TTUalumni13 (496 posts) -

She's probably just trying to keep you balanced out. You'll appreciate it when you're out of the house and have a social life because of it.

Lol at some of the comments in this thread, some of y'all should have been kicked off the controller and thrown outside every once and a while.

#31 Posted by Gallowhand (476 posts) -

As a pro-gaming parent, I can't really understand some people being against their children playing video games at all, unless it is apparent that playing video games is having some kind of obvious negative affect on their child in terms of health (eg., epilepsy), or something else. Admittedly there are some parents who buy into the notion of game violence instigating real world violence, so they may harbour some of those media-fueled fears. It's easier to dispel the more negative notions around 'gaming' when you invest some time to learn more about it, and engaging with it yourself.

I've always taken a more holistic view of games. They are a good source of interactive entertainment, and offer a lot of benefits, from education to improving hand-eye coordination, from improving reflexes to gaining better 3D spacial awareness, overcoming challenges and dealing with the disappointment of failure, and in some cases they can open up discussions on morality, and a whole lot of other issues. They are also a good way of attracting friends, and socialising with friends while playing games.

I never had a game console when I was growing up - I was born in the 1960s but a large chunk of my childhood was in the 1970s. I may have played some arcade games like Pac-Man in the late 1970s, but I didn't really get into gaming until my college years in the 1980s. So I can't really agree with the argument that it's some kind of a generational gap, where the parent didn't play video games as a child, so sees no value in them. Society as a whole may influence perception of video games, but that has also changed (mostly in a positive way) over the past thirty years, except perhaps for the news media which tries to demonize it at every opportunity (because their umbrella companies want to sell you more TV and movies instead).

I spent many happy hours playing video games with my sons, and yes, any common activity can help you to bond with your child. I guess some people still fail to see the benefits of video games, and would rather focus on some of the more negative aspects, which is a shame.

#32 Posted by udUbdaWgz1 (631 posts) -

@Gallowhand:

honestly, I would say the "against ALL video games" to be a VERY high minority. in fact, I've personally never known any parent ever to be against video gaming completely.

#33 Posted by outworld222 (2429 posts) -

@udubdawgz1 said:

@outworld222: some of the comments, however, are juvenile.

I made a very simple point about how video games can be a waste of time when one plays too much, too long, etc. ANY activity that is done "too much" will be to ones own detriment. that shouldn't be a difficult concept to grasp or agree with. I was simply offering a perspective so many on this thread were neglecting.

like I said clearly- I am a gaming enthusiast. I let my children play BECAUSE I think it is a very worthy activity for them to do for a variety of reasons. but, to think that total play time should not be a huge consideration is ridiculous, especially, for younger children/adults.

I happen to agree. I never touched a video game till I was 10 or 11 years old (depending on how you look at it)

But what I believe is is that the reason soooo many were neglecting, is because they feel as if they have come under attack from society, groups, whatever, who cannot possibly understand video gaming as they see it through they're eyes.

Have you seen that one California Representative who got arrested as of late? He was the most anti-video game state senators in the entire nation. Yet, he was busted for trading in guns and possibly being armed to the teeth. I wouldn't label most politicians as being brainwashed gun nuts, would I? Would it be safe to assume that I would be wrong should I make for the case?

Everything you say, you need evidence. You cannot just go on hearsay or "I think" alone.

@Minishdriveby: I happen to think that, in this instance, you happen to be over thinking your points. You mentioned some studies that are pro gaming, and some that are against. Surely, they both cannot conflict?? Or shall I say be right? Or possibly overlap each other?

#34 Posted by huerito323 (1377 posts) -

Because they're brainwashed by the media, and they want to feel like good parents by being against the thing that the media says is bad. Everything is about the media.

Media says middle eastern man with a beard is behind two buildings colliding, people believe it and accept that war is a great solution.

#35 Posted by Minishdriveby (10005 posts) -

@outworld222 said:

@udubdawgz1 said:

@outworld222: some of the comments, however, are juvenile.

I made a very simple point about how video games can be a waste of time when one plays too much, too long, etc. ANY activity that is done "too much" will be to ones own detriment. that shouldn't be a difficult concept to grasp or agree with. I was simply offering a perspective so many on this thread were neglecting.

like I said clearly- I am a gaming enthusiast. I let my children play BECAUSE I think it is a very worthy activity for them to do for a variety of reasons. but, to think that total play time should not be a huge consideration is ridiculous, especially, for younger children/adults.

I happen to agree. I never touched a video game till I was 10 or 11 years old (depending on how you look at it)

But what I believe is is that the reason soooo many were neglecting, is because they feel as if they have come under attack from society, groups, whatever, who cannot possibly understand video gaming as they see it through they're eyes.

Have you seen that one California Representative who got arrested as of late? He was the most anti-video game state senators in the entire nation. Yet, he was busted for trading in guns and possibly being armed to the teeth. I wouldn't label most politicians as being brainwashed gun nuts, would I? Would it be safe to assume that I would be wrong should I make for the case?

Everything you say, you need evidence. You cannot just go on hearsay or "I think" alone.

@Minishdriveby: I happen to think that, in this instance, you happen to be over thinking your points. You mentioned some studies that are pro gaming, and some that are against. Surely, they both cannot conflict?? Or shall I say be right? Or possibly overlap each other?

I don't think I'm over thinking the issue. There are a lot of ways to interpret data from scientific experiments, especially in a field such as social psychology. Conflicting reports just indicate that the area needs more studying, possibly by making experiments more specific; examine certain genres and if those genres have varying effects, most journals I've read lump everything under video game. Some of the contradictions do make sense when reasoned out, why would videogames boost critical thinking skills, yet show a decrease in grades? Because while critical thinking is increased pathological video game use has been seen in youth, meaning although you might have critical thinking skills they're not being put to use at school, as school disinterests them. Many studies also cite a specific game designed to treat depression and other health problems, these games were designed by psychologist/physicians not a random games. Play time also comes into play; casual video gaming, playing a couple minutes here and there, have been shown to decrease stress and anxiety; however, it would be more important to see if the effects are long lasting or only last for a short time after playing the videogame which could be caused by other neurological responses to video games. On the other hand pathological gaming has a linked to increase aggression and depression among adolescents.

Of course, social psychology tries to show mass results while individual effects will vary from person to person (I never liked social psychology classes in college where I was told to ignore that little sampling error that conflicted with the views of the study). While one person's anecdotal evidence is not worth much, I played an excessive amount of videogames (still do), but I also had the restraint to know when to stop and study, so I've never had a grade below a B+ in Highschool nor a grade below an A in University. At the same time I have experienced some anxiety and sadness (never diagnosed as depression so I do not like to throw that term around) occasionally caused by regrets from over thinking about how many video games I play or due to conflicitng time constraints/interests/plans.

Again I'm not saying video games should be avoided, especially as someone who overindulges in them, but constraints should be put in place if negative behaviors or effects are being seen in your child.

#36 Posted by Ryagan (490 posts) -

A lot of them probably think that the time spent playing video games could be spent doing something more productive. That said, my parents have never been against me being a gamer unless I let it get in the way of schoolwork. Other than that, my parents have had no problem with my hobby, which is funny because neither one of my parents has a nerdy bone in his or her body, yet they gladly buy me video games for Christmas and my birthday. That said, my mom does seem to feel bad for me because video games tend to replace my almost nonexistent social life...

#37 Posted by Black_Knight_00 (18507 posts) -

Because 1) they see it as a waste of time that will make you fat, asocial and nerdy, and 2) because they watch Fox News and think games will make you a psychopath.

#38 Posted by mikemiki (6 posts) -

I don't know but it's annoying and it's probably because they think it's waste of time...

#39 Edited by bfmv2007 (289 posts) -

My parents never really cared what I was playing. They knew the violent games I was playing wouldn't have any ill effect on me because they raised me better than that. They also knew as far as sex and language goes, I would hear ten times words things in school, which they were right. Video games aren't even a fraction as bad as some of the people you could get caught up with in school.

#40 Posted by shootinfool73 (15 posts) -

This is an interesting point. I am a 40 yr old parent, pro-gaming, play games myself, and I have 2 kids aged 11 and 13. I had an intellivision, and a commodore64 as a kid, and spent a lot of time on them. My parents never understood the video game thing, being born in 1922 and 1930 (so how could they?), but they didnt argue it either much...just went with the flow and wrote it off as "kids these days..." LOL.

My son spends a lot of time playing video games -- and like most kids today, plays console games (we have a PS3 now and we've had a Wii and WiiU) as well as a 3DS and sometimes mobile apps on an ipod touch or android tablet. I can see how as a parent I am allowing it, and encouraging, because I play games with him too sometimes (or we'll sit and watch each other sometimes if it's a campaign mode game we both enjoyed) -- it is bonding as some of you have said. He has seen me sit for a few hrs at a time playing myself. However, it IS also a social thing because sometimes he has friends over, or goes to their house and plays. Not ONLINE... that's not 'social' at all. But since he doesnt have an abundance of friends yet (he is a bit immature for his age of 11 and has a learning disability), I sometimes worry that he may not have enough alternative social activity too. Games definitely arent the only possible detraction, but probably the most detracting, and really most all consumer electronics pose a problem for true social interaction. That, IMO, is another primary reason why parents like the OP's can get that instinctive response. It's just that some of us are much worse than others because of a lack of experience with games.

Regardless, even assuming you have set appropriate and fair limits for your kids video game usage, parents always have to be aware of the content of the games. Parents are much more aware now that that this is no longer the age of Donkey Kong and PacMan, and that the "rating" on a game is important if they do no know a game. We're much more liberal these days with what we allow our kids to see and listen to, because of what's already out there on regular primetime TV, PG and PG-13 movies, let alone youtube content or the internet in general, but giving your 10 yr old GTA5 is the equivalent of putting a porno in front of your him/her and encouraging them to watch it.

#41 Posted by Korvus (3886 posts) -

After reading some of the answers in this thread, I now understand why parents are against video games; too bad they didn't succeed =P

#42 Posted by RyviusARC (4603 posts) -

Most people fear the unknown.

At one time parents thought comic books or Rock music were just as bad as video games.

Every generation has their scapegoat.

#43 Edited by RyviusARC (4603 posts) -

@shootinfool73 said:

This is an interesting point. I am a 40 yr old parent, pro-gaming, play games myself, and I have 2 kids aged 11 and 13. I had an intellivision, and a commodore64 as a kid, and spent a lot of time on them. My parents never understood the video game thing, being born in 1922 and 1930 (so how could they?), but they didnt argue it either much...just went with the flow and wrote it off as "kids these days..." LOL.

My son spends a lot of time playing video games -- and like most kids today, plays console games (we have a PS3 now and we've had a Wii and WiiU) as well as a 3DS and sometimes mobile apps on an ipod touch or android tablet. I can see how as a parent I am allowing it, and encouraging, because I play games with him too sometimes (or we'll sit and watch each other sometimes if it's a campaign mode game we both enjoyed) -- it is bonding as some of you have said. He has seen me sit for a few hrs at a time playing myself. However, it IS also a social thing because sometimes he has friends over, or goes to their house and plays. Not ONLINE... that's not 'social' at all. But since he doesnt have an abundance of friends yet (he is a bit immature for his age of 11 and has a learning disability), I sometimes worry that he may not have enough alternative social activity too. Games definitely arent the only possible detraction, but probably the most detracting, and really most all consumer electronics pose a problem for true social interaction. That, IMO, is another primary reason why parents like the OP's can get that instinctive response. It's just that some of us are much worse than others because of a lack of experience with games.

Regardless, even assuming you have set appropriate and fair limits for your kids video game usage, parents always have to be aware of the content of the games. Parents are much more aware now that that this is no longer the age of Donkey Kong and PacMan, and that the "rating" on a game is important if they do no know a game. We're much more liberal these days with what we allow our kids to see and listen to, because of what's already out there on regular primetime TV, PG and PG-13 movies, let alone youtube content or the internet in general, but giving your 10 yr old GTA5 is the equivalent of putting a porno in front of your him/her and encouraging them to watch it.

My parents were baby boomers and never played much of games but they let me and my brothers play on an NES as long as we did our homework and kept a good behavior. My father did have a job in the 70s building the cabinets for Pong though, which I thought was pretty cool as a kid.

I guess most parents think if their kid plays video games then they will be anti social which can happen but it can also help a kid socialize if used properly. My mother would let friends come over and play games with me and my brothers but she also limited our time and made us go outside and play as well. My brothers did fight over the NES a lot though. One day my mother had enough of it. She used to take away the console for weeks at a time but my brothers never learned so one day while my two brothers were arguing she just slammed the heel of her shoe into the NES and trashed it.

...If only the NES version of Double Dragon allowed for two player cooperative mode like the arcade version I think that NES would have been saved from the wrath of my mother....

#44 Edited by Gaming-Planet (14022 posts) -

It's pretty simple. Ignorance.

They have a different perspective of something they have never experienced. They can't recommend something they haven't grown up with and therefore can't share that experience with you. It's good to get away from gaming and do other things and take your parent's advice in trying what they recommend for you, but to shun you away from gaming out of pure ignorance is not okay.

#45 Edited by withe1982 (450 posts) -

I'm 33 and have children myself. I've been gaming since the age of 4 (ZX Spectrum) and understand the stigma attached to having video games as your favourite pass-time. I openly encourage my kids to play games whenever possible (after homework/chores etc... ) as I know, not only how much fun they are, but also how educational they can be.

Don't get me wrong I also push my kids to play sports and exercise but I just don't understand the parents who push their kids to be more "social" and go out with friends whenever possible instead of gaming. They have usually taken note of the media who portray gamers as either socially inept lock-ins or gun toting psychopaths. Truth be told I believe kids are much more at risk hanging around with friends outside where peer-pressure plays a massive role in kids trying smoking, drugs, alcohol and petty crime. Much more than video games ever have.

My honest opinion is that if a child is a violent sociopath it's generally down to some deep rooted psychological problem, not through playing a few hours on GTA. In my youth I've played games for days on end and never felt the need to hurt another human being nor have I become an emotional cripple. It's just too easy for people to point the finger at video games or movies, as the possibility that people are just inherently evil or socially incompatible is a hard truth to accept. It takes away any illusion of control we may have over our society.

The most important thing is that kids are raised in a loving and nurturing environment. Irrespective of the games they play or movies they watch.

#46 Posted by Lulu_Lulu (13600 posts) -

I read an Artical on The Escapist that says negativity towards games for parents specifically is not the same as the usual stigma against video games every other non gamer has. For parents, its different, theres just something not quit right about seeing your spawn fiddling with a piece of plastic in their hands front of a screen. In a way I sort of see it that way too... Like "He use to be so full of life and stuff, Now he just sits there.... Tempting epilepsy, I'm glad he doesn't do it for long but I'd be happier if he didn't play games at all" you know... Stuff like that.

It would help alot if you played local multiplayer games more often, perhaps even with your mom.

#47 Edited by RossRichard (2393 posts) -

Because video games have had a stigma to be 'just for kids' for the last 30 years or so. So a parent goes and buys their 9-year-old GTA5 for Christmas, and gets horrified by what little Jimmy is playing. Then some nutjob takes a military-grade assault rifle into a preschool, and the media and politicians blame videogames.

Basically, what I am saying is videogames are what is 'subversive' these days. In the 50s it was Rock and Roll and fast cars. In the 60s it was the hippies and the commies. In the 70s it was Dungeons and Dragons and disco. In the 80s it was heavy metal music/MTV. You get what I'm saying. Videogames are the new scapegoat.

#48 Posted by Glitter (353 posts) -

Parents do not realize that video gaming takes a timely commitment, especially depending on the game, but some parents are starting to realize how video gaming can be healthy in some ways.

#49 Posted by Demonjoe93 (9621 posts) -

Spreading of misconceptions.

#50 Posted by Behardy24 (4540 posts) -

Because it is a young hobby and parents grew up in a different generation that doesn't know much about the hobby. And people are scare of what they don't know.