Should game developer's listen to gamers feedback?

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#1 Posted by Ar54ad (22 posts) -

I know there are some that do and some that don't, but overall should they and would it benefit them?

Give your answer and reason.

#2 Posted by Jacanuk (3470 posts) -

Hmm, did you miss there is a identical thread just with a different headline....

So perhaps we should stick with that and not start here also.

#3 Posted by Ar54ad (22 posts) -

@Jacanuk: Sorry, didn't realise there was another thread. I take this one down.

Thanks for letting me know.

#4 Edited by PinchySkree (43 posts) -

Should publishers listen to developers feedback?

#5 Posted by blamix99 (1499 posts) -

i wish Square Enix did

#6 Posted by Mesomorphin (670 posts) -

In terms of bugs/glitches/online yes! In terms of single player campaign/story/voice actors, no. Its their vision and their adaptation to do what they want, not ours. Imagine leonardo da vinci was told how to paint his paintings....like wtf. Its their art, let them do as they please. If you dont like it then dont invest into it, simple.

#7 Posted by IncisionX (157 posts) -

Of course!

Customer feedback in any line of work is absolutely essential, if you're creating an RPG surely you need to discuss with fans what aspect of an Rpg they enjoy the most to ensure your game has those features? What don't people like? Etc etc

#8 Posted by osan0 (12521 posts) -

its a balancing act and can really depend on the game. that can be said for all industries really.

if you just keep giving people what they say they want then people will become board.

but completely ignoring them can also be a problem.

project cars is going to be interesting. its all based on player feedback. the devs release a build...players (who paid not so small monies to get in early on in development so are probably more serious virtual petrol heads) let them know what they like and they dont like and changes are implemented.

i think if you are making a competative game like a racing sim or even something like trackmania (which is used in gaming tournaments) then player feedback should be gospel. when i say player feedback i dont just mean what they say though but what they are doing also. so if someone is exploiting an imbalance then it gets patched. the players may complain but its an imbalance...tough.

but then we take something like mario kart. for the longest time gamers have been shouting "take out the blue shell"!. but mario kart is built for local MP family fun. take out the blue shell and the more experienced gamer is always going to win that not fun for everyone else. so whould they really take it ouy if their mission is to build a game that offers great local MP family fun?

with kickstarter this may become more of an issue too. personally i dont want pillars of eternity, star citizen or elite dangerous to be built almost entirely on player feedback. for the MP side an analysis of the data (rather than what the players say on forums) would be prudent but not much more than that. i am a pillars of eternity but i dont read the updates or join in the forums. i dont want to know anything about them. i paid obsidian to make the game they want to make becuase they have a great track record (including black isle) of delivering excellence. buggy excellence (thouygh they are getting better in fairness) but excellence none the less.

its always a fine balancing act. i think its important to have a clear objective for the game. an immersive SP RPG (so those looking for MP can take a hike). a sporting game focused on copetative MP (player feedback far more important....but still dont just do what you are told). its hard to call.

obviously feedback based on bugs should always be taken seriosuly though. thats not a game design or content thing...thats a product not working thing. but the negativity also needs to be filtered out. gamers are the worst for that. ranging from the unhelpful "you game crashes. fix it" to death threats. it gets a bit silly.

#9 Posted by Ish_basic (3863 posts) -

Most criticism is just conjecture, with the person raising the objection having no knowledge of whether the changes they propose would actually work. They can be honest and fair-minded, but it's still just a guess and so listening to that criticism can be risky. You also have no clue how common these criticisms you're getting actually are. Obnoxious people are louder and can seem like the majority when they are in fact not.

Devs should get in the habit of providing toolsets to players and then providing an easy to use environment for these player created works to be accessed, downloaded and voted on. Then you get a sense for what your fans really want by taking note of what sorts of mods are most created and used, while also seeing in practice how such tweaks actually work for or against your game. It's also a great way to recruit talent.

#10 Posted by The_Last_Ride (68569 posts) -

Hell yeah they should

#11 Posted by stizzal13 (542 posts) -

Of course they should. Why would they not listen to customer feedback (which comes is many forms)? If your goal is to deliver a valuable good or service, then would you not want more insight into what your customer views as valuable?

The above questions are rhetorical.

#12 Posted by Kevlar101 (5963 posts) -

Only the smart ones.

#13 Posted by Ish_basic (3863 posts) -

@stizzal13: Of course they should. Why would they not listen to customer feedback (which comes is many forms)? If your goal is to deliver a valuable good or service, then would you not want more insight into what your customer views as valuable?

Because the people talking might not represent a large enough portion of your consumer base to warrant making changes. In fact just the act of listening can create a skewed sense of what your players are actually thinking...happens all the time in politics; people mistake the obnoxious for the majority. Companies should and often do initiate their own campaigns to gather feedback, but listening to the kinds of things people say at place like this or in email...terrible idea.

Also, you should know better than to ask rhetorical questions on the internet.

#14 Posted by stizzal13 (542 posts) -

@stizzal13: Of course they should. Why would they not listen to customer feedback (which comes is many forms)? If your goal is to deliver a valuable good or service, then would you not want more insight into what your customer views as valuable?

Because the people talking might not represent a large enough portion of your consumer base to warrant making changes. In fact just the act of listening can create a skewed sense of what your players are actually thinking...happens all the time in politics; people mistake the obnoxious for the majority. Companies should and often do initiate their own campaigns to gather feedback, but listening to the kinds of things people say at place like this or in email...terrible idea.

Also, you should know better than to ask rhetorical questions on the internet.

I do not know any better...unfortunately...

I am sure most companies would know the dangers of listening to a small sample of their customers. Also, feedback comes in many forms, especially in our data driven society. Feedback can be verbal, written, from sales figures, the use of certain features of a game, competitors' actions, clicks on a website, etc.

#15 Posted by TheDarkWolf86 (217 posts) -

I think developers should listen to constructive feedback...ONLY. A lot of developers are recently in the habit of listening to a minority (with a large voice) affect the way the game is utilized. Too many times have I seen games go from an experience to a pile of crap because developers wanted to do what everyone else is doing. The major issue isn't really with the developers listening to the gamers. It stems more towards their unwillingness to trust the gamers and do what everyone else is doing to earn a few bucks. If developers went back to creating new concepts, styles of gaming, story lines, etc. then we will go back to an age of gaming where the gamers are happy and not upset with playing the same thing over and over again.

@Ar54ad said:

I know there are some that do and some that don't, but overall should they and would it benefit them?

Give your answer and reason.

#16 Edited by DJ-Lafleur (34055 posts) -

To some extent yes.

#17 Posted by JO-B-ONE (17 posts) -

To a certain extent. When there are issues with a game such as glitches, bugs, can't connect to server. Even suggestions for making a game experience better. The are some occasions when you read reviews buy gamers that want you to change the whole game and I don't think that is a good idea, they should not play it, if there is that much they would change. Titainfall for instance, I would like to think that with the next gen technology that it could do a lot more and have more then 6vs6, but there may be a reason why they can't or maybe it would compromise a aspect of the game we are unaware of.

#18 Posted by udUbdaWgz1 (330 posts) -

in most instances, NO.

the superficial aspects that many gamers clamor for are usually meaningless additions. and, if the devs need to seriously overhaul their product then they shouldn't have to get that from gamers.

sure, add the fluff that gamers often want (however, it better not take away from the core game.), but, to think devs listen to the complex and more meaningful concepts that lots of us gamers ask for is, in my estimation, way too much to ask.

and, if they do then why the heck are they devs for in the first place? it's hard to change a dev teams overarching philosophy and THAT is real change.

I guess I look at it as a catch-22.

#19 Edited by wiouds (4957 posts) -

They should keep respect the customer while making the product know as a game but not all feedback is from those customers. Squire Enix have been chancing not JRPG fan and take their feedback to make game like FF13. It should be a balance between listening and not taking a important notice.

#20 Edited by Randolph (10325 posts) -

So long as they listen to the right gamers, sure. Square-Enix shouldn't take into account, for instance, people who don't even play Final Fantasy games. Why should they take into account the feedback of someone who mostly plays Madden and Call of Duty? Or someone who exclusively plays fighting games?

For instance, Capcom listened to feedback from people who don't like Devil May Cry when they made the second , made all kinds of concessions for them, and those people still didn't buy DMC2, but all the concessions caused a lot of the people who played and loved the first game to also not buy it.

JRPGs began falling to the wayside not because they couldn't capture the COD crowd, but because they couldn't keep the JRPG crowd.

#21 Edited by RageQuitter69 (1295 posts) -

Since the only thing anyone cares about nowadays is the story and no one cares about the gameplay (which is obviously the most important aspect of a game), no, developers should not listen to gamers feedback, before the release of GTA V, I would have said the opposite, after the release of GTA V, it's very easy to see how much no one can appreciate good gameplay.

#22 Posted by udUbdaWgz1 (330 posts) -

Since the only thing anyone cares about nowadays is the story and no one cares about the gameplay (which is obviously the most important aspect of a game), no, developers should not listen to gamers feedback, before the release of GTA V, I would have said the opposite, after the release of GTA V, it's very easy to see how much no one can appreciate good gameplay.

lol, what do you know: my all-time overrated games are gta4, tlou and gta5 :)

#23 Edited by RageQuitter69 (1295 posts) -

@udubdawgz1 said:

@RageQuitter69 said:

Since the only thing anyone cares about nowadays is the story and no one cares about the gameplay (which is obviously the most important aspect of a game), no, developers should not listen to gamers feedback, before the release of GTA V, I would have said the opposite, after the release of GTA V, it's very easy to see how much no one can appreciate good gameplay.

lol, what do you know: my all-time overrated games are gta4, tlou and gta5 :)

I consider GTA V to be very underrated by gamers (source: http://gtaforums.com/).

#24 Edited by Articuno76 (18635 posts) -

Of course they should. Why would they not listen to customer feedback (which comes is many forms)? If your goal is to deliver a valuable good or service, then would you not want more insight into what your customer views as valuable?

The above questions are rhetorical.

Oftentimes player complaints only point to a superficial (easily identifiable) problem without addressing the core problem.

If you take the player complaints as they are you may well end up with players complaining even when you make the exact changes they asked for.

#25 Posted by bowchicka07 (1064 posts) -

The customer is always right... unless it's different from my opinion.