Back in the old days...

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#1 Posted by dvader654 (44752 posts) -

Lets face it, many of us gaming verterans are old farts now. We started gaming when it was at it's infancy, we have grown up along side it and seen all the changes first hand. If you take a kid that started gaming in the PS2 era and tell them the stuff we had to go through back in our day to play games what do you think they would say. What are the biggest changes from the old school days to today's modern monster machines.

BTW I am an NES era guy so that is what I will reference. If you are a dinosaur and go further back then do so.

There were only face two buttons and a d-pad - No analog stick, omg. No sholder buttons? How did we play?Back then all we needed to do was run and jump. Two buttons and it was enough to give us some of the best games of all time. When I played Zelda I could only carry one item at a time. Games needed to use the select button as a action button at times. But thank god we moved on, I am not one of these "gaming is too complicated" guys. I think the PS model is the limit for buttons, they got it right, that should be the standard.

Cartridges - CDs bah, we had big fat hard plastic covered carts as our games. I have to say it was a lot more fun to hold them. You can throw them across the roomwhen the game pissed you off. Just stack them out of their box without worry. The boxes for the games were almost useless cause the carts themselves were like covers. I had my carts handing out, some on their small black sleeves. Oh and there is a whole other situation that went along with the carts, specifically NES ones...

We had to blow our games - That didn't come out right. Back in the day when you put a game into the NES it did not mean it was going to work. Oh no, trying to get a game to start was a game all of its own. I don't know how everyone came up with the same method (remember kids no internet back then) but somehow we all did. Grab the cart and blow into it, back and forth, really hard. You also had toblow into the console cart slot. When you try to put the cart in sometimes leave a small piece out so that when you slam it in it smacks against the plastic. If that doesn't work keep pressing it up and down over and over. For serious emergencies we took out the q-tips. One time my brother came up with the idea to put the game in the freezer,I have no clue why. Power on, power off, power on, power off, as many times as it took until your damn game started. Sometimes it would start but it would be all screwed up, green lines and stuff all over the screen, man that sucked. Or the very worst, the title screen comes up, you think you finally got the game to work and then it freezes. NOOOOO. Starting our games was an adventure, an adventure I will NOT miss.

No online - Friend lists, online multiplayer, communication of any kind with the outside world was no possible. Why, well for one there was no internet yet or at least it wasn't available to us. When we played 2 player games that other person always had to be sitting next to us on the same console. You couldn't act like a moron cause the other person could reach over and punch you. In some ways this system was better.

All 2D - Yep there were no 3D games, no movement in free space. You had some top down games that allowed you to walk around a world but it was still limited. The majority of games were side scrollers, move from left to right. I love the switch but some games never translated well into the 3D realm. Some games should always stay in 2D and I am glad developers are started a 2D renaissance lately.

No such thing as First Person Shooters - This one would probably give some kids heart attacks. Yeah thats right, no FPSs. No Halos, no CoDs, no counterstrikes, not even Doom. It was a happier time when shooting was not needed in every game, bouncing on creatures heads was usually enough violence.

Now for the worst one, the one I feel that no kid could ever live without.

There was no saving -The biggie, no saving. When you started a game you were expected to play through the whole thing. You had lives, lose the lives and it was game over, START OVER. There was no going back to the point you left off, you had to fight your way through the game over and over and over and if you couldn't do it, too bad. Everytime you put a game in it was a challenge to see how far you can get. Some games found ways around this by offering passwords. Thank Zelda for being the first console game to save your game onto the cart, even though the tech was available early the majority of games didn't include saving. Obviously this aspect had to change, for one games couldn't be long without saving. Plus asking someone to play over and over just totry to see the ending would drive most people insane. Could you imagine that if you died three times in Halo the game would start you over from the beginning. Saving allowed games to evolve into the massive 10+ hour games we have now.

#2 Posted by Euaggelistes (1826 posts) -

You couldn't act like a moron cause the other person could reach over and punch you.

dvader654

Haha. Great line.

Glad you mentioned passwords towards the end there. That is where I was going to go. Fifty eight character passwords with no way to distinguish between O's and 0's or capital I's and lower case l's.

I would also like to nominate double stacking cartridges in an effort to get one to start. Insert the first cartridge. Push it down. Insert a second cartridge to keep the first one pushed down. I do not know why it worked but it did.

#3 Posted by SteelAttack (10520 posts) -

Fifty eight character passwords with no way to distinguish between O's and 0's or capital I's and lower case l's.Euaggelistes
OMG! The Faxanadu passwords! Or "Mantras" as the game called them. Godawfully long passwords with more characters than the actual code of the game. Bleh.

It's funny how even without knowing each other, people from different countries all reached the same pool of common knowledge, like blowing cartridges, stacking them or putting them inside the freezer. We gamers must share some kind of genetic memory.

#4 Posted by juradai (2783 posts) -

I started with the Atari and Colecovision so here is my take in bullet point form.

The Good:

• No Online play: meaning you didnt have to deal with jerks at all unless you were playing multi-player in the same room. In the case of someone talking smack really bad you could just challenge them to a gentleman's game of "I'm going to kick your ass" and physically do it.
• No moving parts which made for a less console failure rate, for the most part.
• You were forced to use your imagination unlike nowadays you just have everything spoon-fed to you.
• You had to be able to read to play RPGs which made for some push to get an education

rpg screen shot
• No sequels, prequels or trilogies. Just flat out rip-off copies of other successful games.

MArio bros rip off
• The term hardcore and casual did not exist. At all.

The Bad:


• Odd shaped game controllers (especially during the Atari and Colecovision days.)

controller
• "Beeps" and "Boops" that passed off as sound effects and music
• Not knowing where to go when you are stuck then having to call a hotline to speak to a "Gaming Pro" ( remember, the Internet wasn't available then)
• Massive plugs that took up two and a half outlets if you had the fortune of owning a power strip

Atari power supply
• Horrible box art
• Truly bad movie to video game adaptions; E.T. anyone?

et
• Blue triangles that served as good guy fighter planes to shoot down the red squares that served as bad guy fighter planes

colecovision screen shot
• Ridiculously long passwords in order to play where you left off if the game had any sort of saving feature

• No Online Play

The Ugly:


• You actually had to buy a game based on box art.

ninja golf
• You were considered a nerd if you played video games.
• The price of the systems and games in comparison to nowadays were very expensive


• Rare to find anyone to talk to about your hobbie during the Atari and Colecovision era

#5 Posted by whisperingmute (1116 posts) -

For somone who started in the "Bit Wars"(SNES/Sega Genisis), I still find it perplexing how so many people will do the same methods when a gaming cart will not work:Blow into the cart. It's like some sort of involuntary impulse that you're compelled to do when a cart will not work.

#6 Posted by Vexx88 (33342 posts) -
We didnt have no fancy HD in 1984!
#7 Posted by AtomicTangerine (4413 posts) -

Going through most of my NES games, there is one thing I noticed more than anything-these games don't exist to be an experience or anything like that, they exist soley to beat you down. When I ask myself why I beat Mega Man 2, the only reason I can think of was to get to the end. Sure, I love that game, but I can totally understand why people would have no interest in it or games like it.

Of course, that's also why many modern games fail to create the same sort of tension. I'm not trying to be one of those people who say everything was better way back, because it totally wasn't, but nothing feels as good as taking a game like Contra and giving it a good kidney punch.

#8 Posted by Gamefan1986 (1316 posts) -

I think you guys are all leaving some things out, mainly how RIDICLOUSLY HARD games were back in our day.

Not even challenging hard, cheap hard.

All these kids today just have AVGN to go by...I LIVED THAT CRAP, I owned a lot of the games he has made videos of, and it saddens me to remember all that stuff and makes me feel good to know that it wasn't just me, and even grown men can't do it. I have recently gone back and played some of those games and I STILL can't do it, and I'm old enough to know why now. Watching his T2 on the NES review made me recall the fact that I was never able to get past the second freaking level.

Couple all this with the no saving, and we shouldn't even call ourselves "Veteran Gamers", we should call ourselves "Battle-Hardened Electronic Warriors".

I even told my mom about and showed her the AVGN videos, if for no other reason then as a valid excuse of all those times between the ages of 5 and 10 that I screamed and got mad at those games.

Bad thing is games are too easy nowadays. I don't ever wanna go back to how things were, but I'd be happy if games were generally more challenging...just without the frustration.

#9 Posted by shocka-delica (245 posts) -

I still have to blow the damn DS cartridges sometimes

#10 Posted by JmanRBS (394 posts) -

Coming from the 8 bit era I can honestly say I am glad the password system for the most part is GONE. Saving was a godsend but I still do miss the simple times back then and not having FPS shooters flood the market. But to be honest, after playing with controllers from the ps1 era and forward...I can honestly say that I don't like the NES controller that much..its uncomfortable for me to hold now. I now try to keep an open mind and not just say "oh everything was better back then" Because honestly..not EVERYTHING was better..but some things were like you mentioned. I miss the fact that there no online..a lot of games these days seem to HAVE to have online or it gets a knock against it. I kind of wish online just stuck with PC gaming but what can you do? It's just going to suck that kids born in the late 90s till whenever will be spoiled by the nearly life like graphics and easy difficulty games seem to have these days. And after playing the new Prince of Persia on the PS3...I can tell one day all companies will probably make games where you can NEVER die in them..thus killing any sort of challenge.

And I have to say..I miss the goofy looking cover art that games had back then!

#11 Posted by LordAndrew (7355 posts) -

[QUOTE="Euaggelistes"]Fifty eight character passwords with no way to distinguish between O's and 0's or capital I's and lower case l's.SteelAttack

OMG! The Faxanadu passwords! Or "Mantras" as the game called them. Godawfully long passwords with more characters than the actual code of the game. Bleh.

It's funny how even without knowing each other, people from different countries all reached the same pool of common knowledge, like blowing cartridges, stacking them or putting them inside the freezer. We gamers must share some kind of genetic memory.

Man, I remember blowing in cartridges and stacking 'em too. We'd do anything to get games working. :)

Never tried the freezer one though. Was there ever any reason to think that it would work, or was it just one of those things people did just to be thorough?

#12 Posted by btaylor2404 (11353 posts) -

As a lifelong gamer (since Pong) you make some great points. We have a game I bought for our PC that has many of the old games on it to play for nostalgia's sake and my step-son laughs at the graphics, or insane difficulty. The major advance in my time gaming is memory cards/now HD's. Graphics were always on an uphill climb. You'd go to the arcade the next weekend to see what next years games might look like, but once they made a memory card everything changed. I no longer had to hope for a rainy Saturday to finish a game, or leave it on all night. Every new system I bought the controllers got a bit better, the graphics a bit better, but being able to save my game was the biggest of all to me.

#13 Posted by rragnaar (27023 posts) -

I remember having stacks and stacks of floppy discs for each game. Having a Final Fantasy game on four discs is nothing compared to this:

#14 Posted by Business_Fun (2281 posts) -

I started gaming on the Spectrum ZX, where games came not on cartridges but on cassette tapes. What this meant was that in order to start playing you had to rewind the tape, hit the play button, and then endure several minutes of garishly coloured screen effects and ear-splitting electronic noise while the game loaded, or not, depending on how cooperative it was feeling that day. How I put up with it I'll never know - upgrading to a Master System was like going from stone age to space age!

#15 Posted by dvader654 (44752 posts) -
Great stuff here, keep the stories coming. I also want to hear from the younger generation, what do you think about what we had to go through?
#16 Posted by kfjl (2467 posts) -
Even though the NES is what turned me into a hopeless addict, I go back a bit further than that. My memory sucks but let's see what I can remember from those days. --Back in the day, the main goal of any game was to get the high score and type in your initials as A-S-S --Back in the day, you had to somehow focus on getting that high score while a stranger or group of strangers was behind you looking over your shoulder --Back in the day, a multiplayer game meant that you ran the risk of some random stranger walking up, inserting a quarter in the slot next to you and playing with that person, whether you liked it or not

--Back in the day, you had to somehow play with this:

--Back in the day, text and an imagination was all you needed --Back in the day, you had to team up with a friend just to attempt figuring out what the hell was going on in this game: --Back in the day, real money just didn't seem to be as exciting as Chuck E. Cheese tokens
#17 Posted by Ngakor (38 posts) -

No such thing as First Person Shooters - This one would probably give some kids heart attacks. Yeah thats right, no FPSs. No Halos, no CoDs, no counterstrikes, not even Doom. It was a happier time when shooting was not needed in every game, bouncing on creatures heads was usually enough violence.

dvader654

There was Maze War.

#18 Posted by Jackc8 (8500 posts) -

Back in '82 when I started getting into video games, you actually had to go to the arcade to play them. You would meet people there, not just voices on a headset. There would be girls - some of them would even date you. It was a popular place to hang out.

#19 Posted by Gammit10 (2213 posts) -
back in my day, we only had one red button
#20 Posted by Teuf_ (30805 posts) -

My olden days of gaming mostly consisted of hopelessly tweaking my config.sys/autoexec.bat files or making boot discs in order to get enough free memory to load whatever new game my dad had bought me.

I did play a lot of NES/Sega Master System/Genesis/SNES too of course...you guys all had it easy with those. :P

#21 Posted by Blackguard7666 (37 posts) -

Lets face it, many of us gaming verterans are old farts now. We started gaming when it was at it's infancy, we have grown up along side it and seen all the changes first hand. If you take a kid that started gaming in the PS2 era and tell them the stuff we had to go through back in our day to play games what do you think they would say. What are the biggest changes from the old school days to today's modern monster machines.

BTW I am an NES era guy so that is what I will reference. If you are a dinosaur and go further back then do so.

There were only face two buttons and a d-pad - No analog stick, omg. No sholder buttons? How did we play?Back then all we needed to do was run and jump. Two buttons and it was enough to give us some of the best games of all time. When I played Zelda I could only carry one item at a time. Games needed to use the select button as a action button at times. But thank god we moved on, I am not one of these "gaming is too complicated" guys. I think the PS model is the limit for buttons, they got it right, that should be the standard.

Cartridges - CDs bah, we had big fat hard plastic covered carts as our games. I have to say it was a lot more fun to hold them. You can throw them across the roomwhen the game pissed you off. Just stack them out of their box without worry. The boxes for the games were almost useless cause the carts themselves were like covers. I had my carts handing out, some on their small black sleeves. Oh and there is a whole other situation that went along with the carts, specifically NES ones...

We had to blow our games - That didn't come out right. Back in the day when you put a game into the NES it did not mean it was going to work. Oh no, trying to get a game to start was a game all of its own. I don't know how everyone came up with the same method (remember kids no internet back then) but somehow we all did. Grab the cart and blow into it, back and forth, really hard. You also had toblow into the console cart slot. When you try to put the cart in sometimes leave a small piece out so that when you slam it in it smacks against the plastic. If that doesn't work keep pressing it up and down over and over. For serious emergencies we took out the q-tips. One time my brother came up with the idea to put the game in the freezer,I have no clue why. Power on, power off, power on, power off, as many times as it took until your damn game started. Sometimes it would start but it would be all screwed up, green lines and stuff all over the screen, man that sucked. Or the very worst, the title screen comes up, you think you finally got the game to work and then it freezes. NOOOOO. Starting our games was an adventure, an adventure I will NOT miss.

No online - Friend lists, online multiplayer, communication of any kind with the outside world was no possible. Why, well for one there was no internet yet or at least it wasn't available to us. When we played 2 player games that other person always had to be sitting next to us on the same console. You couldn't act like a moron cause the other person could reach over and punch you. In some ways this system was better.

All 2D - Yep there were no 3D games, no movement in free space. You had some top down games that allowed you to walk around a world but it was still limited. The majority of games were side scrollers, move from left to right. I love the switch but some games never translated well into the 3D realm. Some games should always stay in 2D and I am glad developers are started a 2D renaissance lately.

No such thing as First Person Shooters - This one would probably give some kids heart attacks. Yeah thats right, no FPSs. No Halos, no CoDs, no counterstrikes, not even Doom. It was a happier time when shooting was not needed in every game, bouncing on creatures heads was usually enough violence.

Now for the worst one, the one I feel that no kid could ever live without.

There was no saving -The biggie, no saving. When you started a game you were expected to play through the whole thing. You had lives, lose the lives and it was game over, START OVER. There was no going back to the point you left off, you had to fight your way through the game over and over and over and if you couldn't do it, too bad. Everytime you put a game in it was a challenge to see how far you can get. Some games found ways around this by offering passwords. Thank Zelda for being the first console game to save your game onto the cart, even though the tech was available early the majority of games didn't include saving. Obviously this aspect had to change, for one games couldn't be long without saving. Plus asking someone to play over and over just totry to see the ending would drive most people insane. Could you imagine that if you died three times in Halo the game would start you over from the beginning. Saving allowed games to evolve into the massive 10+ hour games we have now.

dvader654

Man, making me feel old!! lol. Yes, the old school gaming was something I will never forget. I remember my first console was Atarii/2600. My fave games were River Raid, Combat, and Pit Fall. Then came along the NES. I remember getting one for Christmas as soon as it came out, and I was excited. I played Super Mario Bros and Zelda for hours on end. Then, Ninja Gaiden...yah, the side view version! I remember the boss at the end of the train level would kick my arse several times before I finally figured out his strategy. Once I beat that a few times, Bionic Commando was my new fave. Then I got a Sega Genesis, and Mortal Kombat opened up. I remember it had no blood, but the real fatalities, haha. I figured out the blood code later on, anyhow. Think it was: Hold down A and B while pressing Select then Start...not sure. Yah, those were the good days.

#22 Posted by CrashMan09 (261 posts) -

I love this thread. :P

*wistfully wipes away a nostalgic tear*

#23 Posted by Gemini_Red (3290 posts) -

Oh, the things I'll never forget...

1. Battle of the blinking screen: Anyone who had the original NES KNOWS what I am talking about. Remember when your NES started to go bad? It was a minigame in it's own right trying to get that thing to work sometimes.

2. The difficulty: Not to sound elitist but there are times I do have to giggle when I hear about some of today's games being hard. Go back and play Mega Man 2...or even better Ninja Gaiden III on NES and beat them, then we'll talk about difficulty. Anyone who has beaten NGIII deserves a medal as far as I'm concerned. Also try completing Raiders of the Lost Ark on Atari....without help from gamefaq. What made that game difficult was trying to figure out what to do.

3. Everything was new: This is one area where I envy new gamers. After playing games for 25+ years there really isn't much I haven't seen. There are still a lot of games being made that are a blast but I very rarely get that "new" feel anymore, which is a bummer. Back then every new game was an adventure, even if it wasn't a very good one. Speaking of which....

4. Nintendo Power and EGM was our internet: For as great as the internet is for talking about games and finding out what is on the horizon, it also is a matter of information overload. That's more my fault than it is the internets, but back then the info was scarce. Our info was a couple pages in a magazine. With so little info to go on we had to wait more often than not to get our hands on it to actually know what it was like. Now with hands on videos, youtube, video conferences, and an endless amount of resources you can learn everything about a game before they can even get the shrink wrap on. Again it's more of a person's fault than it is the technology, but some of the excitement disappears.

#24 Posted by Smokescreened84 (2482 posts) -

Talk about feeling over the hill. The days before FPS took over and dumbed down gaming, feels like a life time ago. I don't miss things like cheap challenges, but I do miss simple, plain fun that didn't need guns and gore to make it good.

I miss the simple satisfaction of somehow getting that high score, even if other people got a better score somewhere else in the world, it wasn't like you knew unless you were able to get one of the old magazines that had high scores from somewhere else in the country you lived in. All you knew was that you got the score and you felt good about it, then your family or a friend would beat it and you would try even harder.
I don't miss the old Atari joysticks, evil things.

I miss how RPG's would require the player to read - yes whippersnappers, read, you know that delightful thing where you learn and enjoy yourself at the same time because back then patience was required, a gamer had to actually learn and improve if they hoped to do well at games, not pratically have it done for them.
I don't miss games like ET and other really badly done movie licences - not that much has changed in that area outside of a few exceptions.

I miss the challenge of having to work on reaction time to getting a jump right, learning the patterns of attackers, trial and error. These days there's not much trial and error, while there are some challenging games out, they are usually so short that you complete them without even realising that you've been playing.
I don't miss the old 2.5D istrometric games, those games were so annoying for trying to move around in. Some were great games, like Landstalker, but some were so horrible that it made you want to kill.

I miss the varity of games, now a lot of games are mostly FPS with anything with varity being shot down for not having guns and gore.
I don't miss the heavy amount of clones that for the most part were terrible - of course we still get those in the form of FPS games that are mostly the same game with a different name and slightly different visuals- that's how I regard them anyway.

I miss arcades, sure they were mostly scum pits, but it would be nice to play an arcade game sometimes.
I don't miss the image gamers had, at least with gaming we weren't, depending on the person, wrecking our bodies with smoking, drinking and drugs because of enforced peer pressure - though there were plenty of gamers who did as part of status and other meaningless nonsense - much like these days.

I miss games like Streets of Rage, the older 2D Sonics, some 2D games, the Strike series - EA's best in my own opinion, the old side scrolling shoot 'em ups like Thunderforce, non-fancy cut sceneoverloaded games.
I don't miss the old password system.

And most of all - I miss the sheer simple plain fun of gaming, when you didn't need real life graphics to wow you, when you didn't need some big brand name and heavy hype to play a game, you just played it because at the end of the day it was only a video game, not life and death.

R/T

#25 Posted by man_hammer (437 posts) -

Yeah, my first console was an Atari 2600.

I would play Donkey Kong and Mrs Pac Man over and over. The games didn't have endings. It would repeat until you died.

1 player or 2 player

You guys remember this right? That didn't mean 2 player cooperative play or PVP. It meant that you had to take turns every time you died.

#26 Posted by D0LEMITE (71 posts) -

One of my first video game systems was the Texas Instruments TI994a. Complete with voice synthesizer and a cassette tape deck to save games as well as general I/O. I played games that had english and german speech! Clocked in at a whopping 3 Mhz or so.

Pong, had that too.

C64...had it.

NES and Deadly Towers...that was hard game. The games today are easy, mostly eye candy.

#27 Posted by Microdevine (1126 posts) -

im loving this thread.really interesting to read.but seeing as how im only 16 i dont know alot about the older systems.my first system was the original playstation. i didnt have nearly as many problems as you guys but i do remember some things. like the black cds that could literally take a chainsaw and still work.they would still scratch but nvr not work because of them.so awesome.they make todays dvds seem like wimps.and i remember another madden game actually being exciting because it was like new.and not just another rehash.and i do remember not having online. it was sometimes really nice. but the thing i hated the most was trying to play a fps with those psone shoulder buttons and destroying your fingers.lol. and i always used to throw and article of clothing over the power light and turn the tv off so she didnt think i was still playing. good times. keep up the posts.best thread ive read in a while.

#28 Posted by CarnageHeart (18316 posts) -

The first system I ever played was the Odyssey. My dad was a gamer and my little brother and I found his old system in the closet. He had lost the plastic overlays one applied to the screen, so the game we played wasn't even as nice looking as what you see in the shot below (the maze below is a plastic overlay, multicolor graphics were beyond the Odyssey's capabilities IIRC). The only thing I recall about the game(s) my brother and I playedwere wowed by the concept of moving stuff around onscreen. We were really in love when my father brought home a 2600 (the games were a lot more fun and the fact it had color graphics was really amazing).

Gaming has seen a ton of innovations and improvements since then, but some things have remained the same. Companies still leaned heavily on successful franchises (Pac Man was followed by Ms Pacman, Baby Pacman, Super Pacman, and probably some other Pacmans I am forgetting about), licensed games were almost invariably garbage (ET scarred millions of children) and success fueled imitation.

One hears a lot about higher development costs limiting innovation, but in my experience that's more than countered by the amount of talent now floating around the industry. In the 2600 era there were a tiny, tiny, tiny handful of publishers who ocassionally offered quality games (the only names that spring to mind are Activision and Atari, though I'm sure there were others). Now since games have been around for so long there are more talented teams than were talented individual game makers in the 2600 days and as a result, more innovation and variety than there was in the old days.

#29 Posted by LiquidClear (356 posts) -

Ah, blowing in the cartridges is a lost art. The other day when my PS2 wasn't reading a disc, I got down on the ground and started blowing in the little disc holder... I know it serves no real purpose and I know how to open up a PS2 to clean it, but old habits die hard. My sister was just like "... what are you doing?" Some people just don't understand these days!

#30 Posted by edgewalker16 (2278 posts) -

I remember when playing on the Sega Genesis was the greatest thing ever. (Streets of Rage 2!!!!) I also remember blowing into those NES cartridges. The game I remember playing most on THAT system was something called Blades of Glory or something like that. It was a hockey game.

I'm not sold on all of the next-gen systems yet. I'm still finding games for the PS2 to play and I'm content with that. I'm no old-timer, but I do have some old-time memories.

#31 Posted by SteelAttack (10520 posts) -

The game I remember playing most on THAT system was something called Blades of Glory or something like that. It was a hockey game.

edgewalker16

Blades of steel probably. It always amazed me how they managed to put digitized voice in there for the title. Besides, you could fight!

Photobucket

#32 Posted by SteelAttack (10520 posts) -

Companies still leaned heavily on successful franchises (Pac Man was followed by Ms Pacman, Baby Pacman, Super Pacman, and probably some other Pacmans I am forgetting about).CarnageHeart

I thought you were joking about Baby Pacman. You were not.

Holy crap.

#33 Posted by man_hammer (437 posts) -

Yeah, I remember baby Pac Man.

It was at this bar & restaurant that my mom worked at.

It also had cocktail style Galaga and Space Invaders. I could play a game and put my soda on it.

#34 Posted by atm0073 (3069 posts) -
Very valid points. I started gaming during the 5th generation (PS, N64, et cetera), and had even played consoles such as the Sega Genesis and Super Nintendo numerous times during my childhood, so I know where you're coming from (especially the "blowing in cartridges" :lol: and "no online"... I didn't even start playing online games until the current generation, when I got my 360). There have been some very good and very bad evolutions as the generations have progressed, but overall, I would have to say the change has been for the better.
#35 Posted by firedonut (390 posts) -

Did anyone else have the problem with the NES where the locking mechanism for the cartridge slot no longer worked and the game would just pop back up once you pressed it down? What better way to solve this problem than...another cartridge! I remember using games to lock in my other games so I can play them. You haven't lived until you've used two games to play one!:)

#36 Posted by Gemini_Red (3290 posts) -

Did anyone else have the problem with the NES where the locking mechanism for the cartridge slot no longer worked and the game would just pop back up once you pressed it down? What better way to solve this problem than...another cartridge! I remember using games to lock in my other games so I can play them. You haven't lived until you've used two games to play one!:)

firedonut

That's the REAL magic of a game genie :) Whenever a game wouldn't work I'd just slap that on and(most times) I was ready to play.

#37 Posted by edgewalker16 (2278 posts) -
[QUOTE="SteelAttack"]

[QUOTE="edgewalker16"]

The game I remember playing most on THAT system was something called Blades of Glory or something like that. It was a hockey game.

Blades of steel probably. It always amazed me how they managed to put digitized voice in there for the title. Besides, you could fight!

Photobucket

Yeah, that's the one! Fighting was epic, my friend and I would play the game for the sole purpose of trying to fight as often as possible. To us, scoring goals was alot less important than winning fights. Although, we eventually had to score goals so the game would end.
#38 Posted by CarnageHeart (18316 posts) -

[QUOTE="CarnageHeart"] Companies still leaned heavily on successful franchises (Pac Man was followed by Ms Pacman, Baby Pacman, Super Pacman, and probably some other Pacmans I am forgetting about).SteelAttack

I thought you were joking about Baby Pacman. You were not.

Holy crap.

Yes, franchise milking is as old as the industry itself :P.

#39 Posted by CarnageHeart (18316 posts) -

[QUOTE="edgewalker16"]

The game I remember playing most on THAT system was something called Blades of Glory or something like that. It was a hockey game.

SteelAttack

Blades of steel probably. It always amazed me how they managed to put digitized voice in there for the title. Besides, you could fight!

Photobucket

Yeah, I remember when voice was the coolest thing in the world.

One time a buddy of ours and my brother got into an argument about the merits of next gen systems (at that point, the TG-16 and the Genesis). To demonstrate to the guy (who for some reason I can't remember, wasn't in the house but wasstanding on the ground outside of our second floor window shouting back and forth with us) the power of the next generation, my brother turned the volume all the way up on our tv and started up Altered Beast. When 'Wise from your gwave!' boomed out from the tv's speakers, my brother was like 'Yeah, there's your next gen' or something to that effect and the guy conceded the point :lol:.

#40 Posted by redfield_137 (2269 posts) -

Ah, this thread brings a tear to the eye...I remember when I was a wee lad and I played the Atari all day long. Just a joystick with a button or two....ahhh those were, indeed, THE days.

#41 Posted by MJoanne (878 posts) -

This thread brings back a lot of memories. I started gaming when Pong was an arcade game. My Atari 2600 is still around here somewhere. I remember my first computer game was Infidel, a text only game - no graphics!

infidel.jpg infidel picture by swerdnagrl22

#42 Posted by King9999 (11835 posts) -

There's no way I could ignore a thread like this. :P

You know what's weird? I've only had to blow NES carts, but never carts on other consoles. I never had issues with Master System carts. Maybe it has to do with the fact that the SMS was top-loading. I'm sure the top-loading NES doesn't have any issues playing carts.

#43 Posted by LordAndrew (7355 posts) -

There's no way I could ignore a thread like this. :P

You know what's weird? I've only had to blow NES carts, but never carts on other consoles. I never had issues with Master System carts. Maybe it has to do with the fact that the SMS was top-loading. I'm sure the top-loading NES doesn't have any issues playing carts.

King9999
I believe top-loaders are indeed more reliable.
#44 Posted by rragnaar (27023 posts) -

Yes, franchise milking is as old as the industry itself :P.

CarnageHeart

Baby Pac Mans need milk too.

#45 Posted by SemiMaster (19009 posts) -

Two comments :

1.) Multiplayer. Last night I tried to get split screen UT3 going with a friend. We had to go through logging in, then making sure I was on the network, and all this other crap. What happened to "2P press start" on the upper right hand corner? Simpler is better, I miss those days, now it's all XBox live 64 player etc...

2.) Blowing on the cartridges actually removes the dust but humans expel water along with air, that actually oxidized old NES connectors. It actually made the problem worse.

#46 Posted by dvader654 (44752 posts) -
[QUOTE="edgewalker16"][QUOTE="SteelAttack"]

[QUOTE="edgewalker16"]

The game I remember playing most on THAT system was something called Blades of Glory or something like that. It was a hockey game.

Blades of steel probably. It always amazed me how they managed to put digitized voice in there for the title. Besides, you could fight!

Photobucket

Yeah, that's the one! Fighting was epic, my friend and I would play the game for the sole purpose of trying to fight as often as possible. To us, scoring goals was alot less important than winning fights. Although, we eventually had to score goals so the game would end.

I love that game!!! Yeah fighting was the star, it was like its own game.
#47 Posted by Darkman2007 (17881 posts) -

as a person who started gaming in the very early 90s, I can just remember most of these things. FPS games were rare to non existant, most games had no save feature,lots of2D gaming.

some things like the lack of saving was a bad thing, we needed saves so that games can expand. we needed to ditch cartridges, so that games can be bigger and more involving

but gaming where FPS games are a rarity and gameplay triumphs over graphics, was and is gaming heaven.

we cared about graphics as well, but I reckon people who were gaming in the 80s and 90s have a higher tolerence for games which look "bad", cause thats what we had for 20+ years

I think all that stopped after the PS1/N64/Saturn era, which I consider the last golden age of sorts for gaming

#48 Posted by gameguy6700 (12197 posts) -

I started gaming back in the 16-bit era so the things I remember are:

- Voices in games were rare. It was a big deal if a game even had a digitized voice read out the title at the start screen. And forget spoken dialogue, you actually had to read everything in the game.


- Portable game systems were only portable in the sense that they ran off of batteries and not a power outlet. Think the DS Phat is a hulking montrosity? The original Gameboy puts it to shame in terms of sheer bulk and weight. There's a reason why the Gameboy Pocket sold so well (that reason being that for once you didn't need a carrying case for your portable system). Also, portables ran off of disposable batteries, not those fancy rechargeable internal batteries. For the price of four AA batteries you got 10-14 hours of gameplay with the Gameboy. If that sounds bad keep in mind that the Game Gear ate six AA batteries and only gifted you with 5-6 hours of play (it was arguably worth it though considering that the Game Gear actually had a color backlit screen, something that Nintendo didn't implement for about another 16 years).


- If you wanted to pirate a game you actually had to find someone with the game, copy the floppy disc contents (yes, games used to come on both 5" and 3.5" floppies), and then write them to a blank disc. You just had to be sure that the person you were borrowing from wasn't a douchebag or else you'd end up with a virus instead of a game. As for console and handheld games, the only way to "pirate" those was to go down to a real store and steal the game yourself.


- The "select" button actually existed for the purpose of selecting menu options


- CD games were overhyped to an absurd degree. Every console maker promised a CD drive attachment for their system (to be released at some unknown point in the future of couse) but only Sega actually followed through (and then subsequently bombed).

- You didn't need memory cards to save your games. Either the game would use a password system (ugh) or in rare cases would actually allow you to save to the cart itself. If you were a gamer in the 16-bit or earlier generation then it was guaranteed that you had a stack (or drawer) full of papers scribbled with nonsense letters and numbers on them.

#49 Posted by CarnageHeart (18316 posts) -


- CD games were overhyped to an absurd degree. Every console maker promised a CD drive attachment for their system (to be released at some unknown point in the future of couse) but only Sega actually followed through (and then subsequently bombed).

gameguy6700

You're forgetting the TG-CD. It had some pretty amazing games (Spriggan, Gates of Thunder, JB Harold Murder Club, Vasteel) though like with the Sega CD, games tend to use CDs for audio and cinemas, not game content.

#50 Posted by King9999 (11835 posts) -

[QUOTE="gameguy6700"]


- CD games were overhyped to an absurd degree. Every console maker promised a CD drive attachment for their system (to be released at some unknown point in the future of couse) but only Sega actually followed through (and then subsequently bombed).

CarnageHeart

You're forgetting the TG-CD. It had some pretty amazing games (Spriggan, Gates of Thunder, JB Harold Murder Club, Vasteel) though like with the Sega CD, games tend to use CDs for audio and cinemas, not game content.

Wow, someone else who's played JB Harold? :shock:

I think NEC made the most out of the whole CD add-on craze, simply because they made great games with the format, and didn't rely on FMV like everyone else. Oh, and CarnageHeart, you can also add Dracula X to your list...