AC - Alex Amancio and Jade Raymond

#1 Posted by CrusaderProphet (37 posts) -

http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2014/06/04/assassin-s-creed-revelations-creative-director-returns-for-unity.aspx

I am glad that Alex is at the helm of AC Unity, his passion to integrate gameplay and narrative is clear and honest, and has not changed over the course of years. We need more people like him in the industry.

On the other hand Jade Raymond was behind the scenes for the inception of the AC series. Do you believe she should have been the primary creative director of Unity?

http://www.gameinformer.com/b/features/archive/2014/08/18/can-assassins-creed-unity-pull-off-a-love-story.aspx

#2 Edited by Black_Knight_00 (18281 posts) -

The way things are, Assassin's Creed only needs to go through the assembly line to keep selling. "Just do what we did last year". A well trained chimpanzee could direct it at this point.

That's not to say it's bad, mind you, only that the formula is so established that it doesn't really matter who's in charge.

#3 Posted by CrusaderProphet (37 posts) -

@Black_Knight_00: hahhahah oh God your "assembly line" phrase cracked me up, I am a LSS certified black belt engineer and I am laughing so hard right now...it also reminded me of the Charlie Chaplin movie "Modern Times". I know they have been making games with a set formula at least the missions in the game, but I really believe this guy is trying to change that, I guess only time will tell. You can feel in his interviews though that he really is very passionate about taking the AC franchise to a better direction. His example of the game "Passage" remains his inspiration for his work which means he does not just go to work to earn a salary, instead he truly wants to deliver quality product which is the reason I am hopeful. I loved the feeling of revelations even thought the story was a bit smashed together, which is why he might have a better chance with Unity since he has had more time to help build it.

#4 Edited by Black_Knight_00 (18281 posts) -

@crusaderprophet said:

@Black_Knight_00: hahhahah oh God your "assembly line" phrase cracked me up, I am a LSS certified black belt engineer and I am laughing so hard right now...it also reminded me of the Charlie Chaplin movie "Modern Times". I know they have been making games with a set formula at least the missions in the game, but I really believe this guy is trying to change that, I guess only time will tell. You can feel in his interviews though that he really is very passionate about taking the AC franchise to a better direction. His example of the game "Passage" remains his inspiration for his work which means he does not just go to work to earn a salary, instead he truly wants to deliver quality product which is the reason I am hopeful. I loved the feeling of revelations even thought the story was a bit smashed together, which is why he might have a better chance with Unity since he has had more time to help build it.

I don't think quality has ever been an issue: a few bugs aside (especially in 3 and I'm told 4) all AC games have always been great and I'm sure this one will be as well. The problem is that the series is in a creative and design rut, and has been for about 4 years, the only substantial addition to the game mechanics being the excellent naval battles, which I hear will be absent in Unity and were never part of the core gameplay anyway.

They should change course. I would flip the table by making combat against soldiers punishingly hard, almost unwinnable, to funnel players into using the new stealth mechanic Ubisoft has implemented from Splinter Cell. After all, people don't buy AC for the combat, they buy it for the freedom of action, so shifting the focus on pure stealth would not displease the existing fanbase at all, all the while attracting may of those gamers who have criticised the series all these years for being too easy.

That said, Ubisoft's approach seems to be "if ain't broken, don't fix it", so unless sales start dropping, I doubt any substantial changes will be made to the formula, as it is safer to give people what they already know they like.