Feature Article

Why You Should Buy a PC in 2014

Everything, for everyone.

Are people even debating whether or not a PC is a worthwhile purchase if your aim is to play games? Buying a PC is typically a costlier endeavor than splurging on a single console, certainly, but gaming PCs have become a greater and greater bargain, and several of the Steam Machines on the horizon will be bringing PC gaming to your living room at console prices. And while older games aren’t always guaranteed to work, backwards compatibility isn’t a vital concern: PCs don’t subscribe to console generations, and many classics have been patched, updated, and improved to run on the fastest of modern computers. There’s no question about it: a PC made from moderately powerful hardware gives you access to the most games, the prettiest games, and the most interesting games from the past, the present, and the future.

The Library

The PC’s library is larger than any other current platform’s by several orders of magnitude--and running most current games doesn’t mean spending an arm, a leg, and a remaining pinky toe on powerful hardware and fancy liquid-cooling systems. The repertoire is seemingly endless, loaded with old favorites, modern gems, and fanciful experiments that are changing the face of the industry.

Is there any denying League of Legends' staying power?

A simple look at Steam, Valve’s digital storefront, tells you most of what you need to know. Most of the so-called triple-A games that monopolize the conversation find a home on the PC. You know the ones: Assassin’s Creed, Call of Duty, FIFA, Tomb Raider, BioShock, and so forth. And not only do many of these games find their way to the PC, but they look visually superior in almost all instances, making the PC the one system you need if good looks are your primary concern. Furthermore, the PC is still the natural home for several genres, real-time strategy games chief among them.

But as important as many of the multiplatform games are, the PC has singlehandedly altered the landscape with games that owe their successes to the machine that does everything. League of Legends and StarCraft II dominate the e-sports scene, while innovative games like MineCraft and DayZ not only found and built audiences, but introduced trends that inspire development studios on every platform. And if you want to take a trip down memory lane, or experience the classics of their day for the first time, games like Planescape: Torment, Half-Life, System Shock 2, and Deus Ex are easily available and every bit as wonderful as they once were.

Upcoming Games

In Star Citizen, the legacy of Wing Commander lives on.

The advent of the pre-release purchase and the rise of crowdfunding have ensured that the future of PC games is as bright as the blazing sun. Starbound isn’t even officially out, yet over a million people have already purchased it, enamored by its unique blend of exploration and survival. Famed developer Peter Molyneux is bringing us Godus, which looks to bring the joys of god games like Populous to a modern audience. Then there’s Star Citizen, Chris Roberts’ upcoming space sim, which has astoundingly raised over $36 million in crowdfunding. The crowdfunding explosion has reinvigorated traditional ideas and new innovations alike. If you have lamented the dearth of deep isometric role-playing games, Divinity: Original Sin and Wasteland 2 are prepared to quench your thirst. If you long to test your strategic wits, Planetary Annihilation and Age of Wonders III shall be competing for your time.

Lest you think that the folks at Blizzard have forgotten the platform that paved the way to their success, don’t forget upcoming expansions for both Diablo III and StarCraft II. There are multiplatform games coming too, of course, though some, like The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, seem to me like PC-centric games through and through. And I’m willing to bet that even upcoming multiplatform games like Titanfall, Dragon Age: Inquisition, and Watch Dogs will look better on the PC than any other platform--including the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

The Hardware

Dying Light is one of many upcoming games that will support the Oculus Rift.

PC hardware is as varied as its game library, and the finest machines don’t come cheaply. Yet the high price of PC gaming is often overstated, in part because high-end enthusiast components break the bank quickly. You could drop $1000 alone on a multi-GPU graphics card like the GeForce GTX 690 before adding the additional costs of a motherboard, a CPU, and whatever other doodads you want to add. But unless 5760X1080 is a meaningful resolution to you, you needn’t empty your checking account for a good PC that plays recent games at reasonable resolutions and settings. Few developers are pushing the limits of all those cores, so there’s no reason you can’t build or buy a sub-$1000 PC that meets reasonable gaming needs.

Of course, the least expensive PCs cross over into console-price territory, and if you aren’t a do-it-yourselfer, various manufacturers are preparing to release affordable Steam Machines that run Valve’s Steam OS and support the upcoming Steam Controller. And with the money you save, you might want to keep your eye on the PC gaming hardware that further supplements your experience. Hardware like the Oculus Rift, which is the closest yet we’ve come to experiencing virtual reality. Hardware like the TrackIR headtracker, which brings more authenticity to games like ARMA III. And hardware like the endless keyboards, mice, racing wheels, and gamepads vying for your attention.

Other Stuff

Games for almost everyone. Who would have thought? Besides, you know, everyone?

In case you haven’t noticed, PCs were doing the whole “not just for gaming” thing before console manufacturers ever considered offering experiences that weren’t games. But of course you did notice, because computers aren’t just gaming platforms: for many of us, they are the way in which we interface with the world. “Including a web browser” may be something to celebrate on other machines, but accessing the Internet is a way of life for almost every PC owner. It is how we consume news and entertainment. It is how we discover ideas and express our own. And, for better or for worse, it is often how we socialize with others.

People have rightfully celebrated machines like the Wii for making games an entertainment choice for every member of the family, but the PC had already been doing that for many years. Grandmothers were playing online Scrabble before we were talking about how they were tending farms on Facebook, let alone before we were talking about how they played Wii Tennis with the family. In 2000, The Sims introduced a new kind of experience to the gaming public--and a new audience to games. While companies have struggled to create a gaming machine that has universal appeal, they overlooked the obvious: the PC is that machine already. It has been that way for quite some time, and it will remain that way for some time to come.

Viva la PC!

Written By

GameSpot senior editor Kevin VanOrd has a cat named Ollie who refuses to play Rock Band because he always gets stuck pla

Discussion

1134 comments
Rayn303
Rayn303

Duh.

PC was, is and always will the at the cutting edge of gaming. That's not the issue with it. Neither is the price, at least for anyone with enough brains to shop around.

The problem is, in today's world of ever increasing simplicity (and simpletons), a gaming console is just simpler and more convenient for many. Gone are the days of PC users who wanted to learn their PC's, know their hardware and software inside out, and use their PC's for everything AND gaming. Today's PC "users" just want 3 things: Facebook, YouTube and Games. And for those 3 things, a console is a perfect match - no drivers, no windows, no viruses, no problems...

So don't feel bad for the console gamer. He/she is getting exactly what they want. And if they every realize there is more to computers that FB,YT, and games, they'll meet us on the other side. As for the rest of them... it's better for everyone if they stayed console gamers. Don't you think?

sol666x
sol666x

I have been a PC fan for a very long time...but ever since PS4 was released I am at a loss. There is a constant smear campaign by the console manufacturers against PC claiming that PS4 and XBOX ONE has way better graphics then PC when they are clearly comparing updated game software on Console against an non-updated version of the same software on PC. PC is capable of higher definition graphics and more sophisticated AI. compared to PC, the current consoles are not even optimized for UHD. And yet game publishers have completely abandoned PC. I counted 10 or so known AAA titles to be released till December (most of which may end up a flop with a mediocre rating), other then those there are only indie games that don't even look worthy of an expensive high end PC rig. SO WHY THE HELL SHOULD I BOTHER BUYING A NEW GRAPHIC CARD FOR 1000 BUCK. WHAT DO I HAVE TO LOOK FORWARD TO ON A PC? most anticipated games that were scheduled to be released on PC suddenly announce that they are not coming to PC. I am lost as to whether I should bother upgrading my rig anymore? pc has been completely forsaken by the money obsessed corporates!  

chyng85
chyng85

PC is too distracting while gaming~

cratecruncher
cratecruncher

Great article KV.  I'd also add that when you take into account the lower prices for games on PC the total cost of ownership is lower than a console.  I recently purchased 7 AAA titles in a Steam sale for $34!  Those games would have cost about $350 if they'd been in a console format.

horizonwriter
horizonwriter

Brilliant points and well stated. As a person that games on consoles and PC I have to applaud you Kevin for touting the many positives to owning a gaming rig without sounding like an arrogant jerk, which too many stoop to doing. It never ceases to amaze me how quickly people leap to suck the joy out of something as entertaining and wide open as gaming so it's nice to see you showing that having passion for the PC doesn't mean you have to have a superiority complex.

Josh Beebe
Josh Beebe

Roy, you'd have a nice comment there, if I was ONLY talking about the people commenting on this. Truth is, I spend part of my time over at Gamefaqs and have browsed other gaming forums and it's usually all the same way. So, while yes, I did make reference to the posts here, it was easier than saying, "Just go to such and such a website and then here and you'll see a pattern."

Roy Frostys
Roy Frostys

So a little amount of people commenting on facebook posts can define a whole genre...k

icolight
icolight

I acquired the oculus rift development kit a few months ago, since then I've sold about fifteen years worth of gaming consoles, accessories, literature and collectibles. Gone full epic expensive PC with the intent of investing even more so in the coming years. This drastic change can be attributed to the smaller space I have in the city, but also, I just don't see a point in the console like I did when I was a teenager. (I'm not even getting the genre's I like developed anymore on the console) All my devices are tethered, my friends and family aren't tech savvy, so the ps3/xbox360 controllers on the coffee table raise no suspicion. Bricks are shat further when they realize they can play lan/online with all the screens in my apartment. Then there's the cheap media computer with "all the things" for them to watch/listen. I suppose I'm missing out on exclusives, but to be honest I never feel like I'm getting my money's worth. I mean, last 4 or 5 years its just been a chore. The Last of Us was the final straw lol (Amazing game!). I'll be switching over to Let's Play's for ubisofts next cinematic extravaganza. 

blusage2014
blusage2014


I took the leap- and invested in what will now be my sixth self-built PC. It is very important that the gaming industry grows to cater for ages 35- and beyond. I was put off by the myth of 'average gamer being 25-34"- suggesting 34 is some sort of end-date. 

Naturally, it is easy to see why. At this age- we have much more pressing things to attend too. However, life without  the occasional killer game- would just not be the same ! 

For the record- Witcher 3 is on top of my list.

Angryduck67
Angryduck67

This is interesting for me because logically, the PC always makes the most sense. Well, sort of. I mean, I remember when I was a wee lad trying to put together my first gaming rig and I convinced my parents to let me invest the cash in it because I said that we already had a PC, and the video card was basically like buying a PS2 that just goes in your PC. And you can have those two things in one, except it's better. That was around 2000. I still play that same PS2, that gaming PC plateaued and was mostly useless in like 3 years. In PC gaming terms, this is referred to as "maybe turning down the settings and not getting 4K 120 FPS 3D on three TVs" but it reality it's a relationship that leads to playing ugly games at poor framerates with zero local multiplayer options unless you want to throw a LAN party. Still playing that PS2, 3 PCs later and the most recent one (2008) has been relegated to the occasional indie or whatever impulsive (and poor) choices are made during Steam sales. 

And I'm not even upset about it anymore. Because: 

1. The variety argument is mostly true, PC games are all over the map so I never needed a perfect rig to stay in the game. However, the problem is that quantity is emphasized over quality. There are already more games on any given platform than I will ever have enough time to play. If PC has 100 games for every 10 console games, it's useless to me if only 1-2 of those PC games interest me, whereas the console hits somewhere around 3-4. 


2. Virtually zero high-profile Japanese support, and when it does happen it often takes the form of haphazard ports that lack features and ongoing support (which also happens to western games, so actually just chock this up as spotty multiplat support in general). I can't even imagine being a "gamer" who doesn't even have access to Nintendo or Atlus games, or some of the stuff Sony has concocted over there, or Monster Hunter, or games like Bravely Default. I suppose philosophically that last one feels like a console game.


3. I can't play PC games on the couch with my wife, kind of a big deal. It's also nothing short of a logistical nightmare to set up a huge PC in the living room. The last time I tried I had the thing sitting on a coffee table with another coffee table for the mouse and keyboard with chords everywhere. Steam machines are designed to solve this problem, but why would I want one?


4. Low-end PC gaming is pointless. I recently got a cheap laptop because I needed one for work. I thought, hey this might be nice to play some games on in my downtime traveling and such. It's a fine laptop, it does everything I need it to, but even Starbound struggles on this thing. In certain places it's even unplayable. Even old games generally don't play well, I presume because hardly anything is optimized for an APU architecture so finding out how well a game will play is basically role the dice and see what happens. I generally stick with my 3DS or even my phone if I want to play game over my laptop, and the price of my laptop (clearance at 250) plus a PS4 still costs significantly less than a solid gaming PC that will last 4-5 years, much less 8, much less play games at better qualities with better performance than a PS4. And even then I would have to reconcile the lack of games I actually want to play and can play with my wife and friends, non of whom play on PC.

mattsaroni
mattsaroni

um i was thinking Sims 4 and GTA V. Not Godus and....Star Citizen? 



Amillennialist
Amillennialist

The first time your favorite console manufacturer comes out with a newer and more powerful system and all the games you already own don't run on it, you realize the value of the PC.

Besides the flexibility to upgrade hardware for better performance and more features, older -- and just plain old -- games still run just as well as (or better than) when they were new.

And the experience isn't limited to the office/study; connect the PC to a 65" plasma and an AV receiver with 5.1 surround sound, put the hardware into an HTPC-format case, and add a wireless mouse, keyboard, a couple of Logitech Cordless Rumblepad 2s, and a 22" touchscreen monitor on the side, and you've got an unrivaled gaming experience.

Besides everything else the PC can do. Which is everything.

And here's one last argument for the PC: 

http://amillennialist.blogspot.com/2014/02/an-argument-for-pc-as-ultimate-gaming.html


UKFX
UKFX

Apart from consoles getting more and more expensive and trying to get casual gamers to spend stupid money on games that push the hardware too far too soon (720p, 30fps release games as an example), the idea behind the console is lost. Consoles were about affordability and fun, not trying to tick every box there is to tick. Games should be built for consoles to play to their hardware capabilities, aiming for graphics that can be run under immense conditions at 1080p native at 60fps. Graphics aren't everything. In fact graphics are my secondary choice and I am a PC gamer myself.

I've played console and PC for years, but the value for money with consoles has forever been dropping, year after year and I'd been playing console for quite some time, on things like PS2 Online (with the chunky adapter) playing things like Socom 1, 2 and 3, Crash Bandicoot and the king of all the BF games, Battlefield Modern Combat 2  (a console only spin off that was nothing short of legendary in my eyes and still to this day whoops the broken mess -- on all platforms -- BF4). I had 2 PS1s as well... a SNES and a Sega Megadrive. I'm only 25 so I can't go much further back than that lol.

As the value for money with consoles dropped like a stone over a short space of time, i.e. expensive digital downloads, expensive hard copy games, the DLC boom that came along with it and the near-mandatory subscriptions... I find that it isn't worth it. I remember my last few gaming experiences on the PS3 - BF3 and Skyrim. 2 games that run so badly, I spent more time complaining than playing - I'm sure of it. The console struggled to achieve 30fps on BF3, most of the time it felt like a slideshow, but Skyrim however was worse. Any wandering into the wilderness was (without joke) about 10fps and this would be early into a new game so save files had nothing to do with it. I know these are examples of games on aged hardware but the point is, consoles should play to their strengths and not try to achieve high graphics. Most kids and adults for some bizarre reason will not buy games if they look less than realistic. Absurd. If Minecraft players didn't see past that then it wouldn't have sold the millions of copies that it had done. Anyway my experience with consoles ultimately led me to selling my PS3, which I never thought I'd do. I then spent my £350 saved for the PS4 on a HIS 7870 IceQ X (which I overclocked) and a decent mountain bike for the sake of excercise. I'm playing games at 1080p like BF4 on a mix of High and Ultra and it runs like butter. With refinements to Mantle coming, I'm fortunately included in the 7xxx to receive updates and improvements to Mantle.

If you weigh the pros and cons of consoles and PCs, you'll realise as I did that the consoles these days just don't offer enough and the gap in pricing (especially long term) actually weighs in favour of the PC. When the Xbox One and PS4 consoles age a bit, a mid-spec PC will still have better graphics even if you aren't running the maximum settings in game and of course, depending on how you feel, you can change those settings to balance your FPS or, if you wish, you can upgrade... or not.

I'll be happy to the point where playing games at 60fps on Medium (on most games) at 1080p, is no longer possible with my i5-2500K and my 7870. Once that happens, I know an upgrade is in order, but by then it'll be like 5 years since I've had the PC and a new one is probably in order.

I've weighed the pros and cons of console vs PC many times, but to me the pros of consoles kept getting fewer and fewer. By "next-gen", I honestly don't think it'll be worth investing in consoles. The ideas like the Ouya, to me, is what a console should be about. If you want movies, use Netflix, if you want a blu-ray movie, use a blu-ray player, etc. A console should be about cheap, affordable gaming that is fun... yet the persistent "omg the graphix suxxxxxx" attitude is why those new shiny, supposedly next gen consoles are already reaching the boundary on what they are capable of.

Xbox One - 720p games upscaled at 30fps.

PS4 is evidently better, but it won't be long before that feels the effects either.

Oh, if anyone plays Insurgency, BF4, CSGO, Minecraft, Cubeworld, Starbound, Terraria or Payday 2, feel free to add me on Steam. :) I'm Capt. Baldy!

Peace

tripletopper
tripletopper

Sammoth, I didn't say the Mac was a primary gaming computer.  It's more for free flash games that don't work on consoles, email, websites, spreadsheets, printed page making, media downloads, and other "less core gaming material".   I used a Windows operating system, even as an alternate OS for a Mac, and it's a security nightmare, viruses, malware, giving people to repair your computer remotely to God knows who who may make your computer worse.   I'm saying a Mac is a good computer for those who want to do practical things.   You supplement it with a Wii U for Nintendo and more "old school" games and your choice of an Xbox One or a PS3 for a more"AAA game" experience.  Don't like one or the other, less money for consoles, more money for games.


If you think of computers like cars, PC's are custom jobs using a body from one company, a transmission from another, and an engine from a third.   Will it be better than a Mac (practical computer) or console (entertainment computer), depending on how much money, research, and stick-to-it-iveness you're willing to put into it, it can be a custom PC for your specific purposes all the way to the uberdevice.   You'll get anywhere from slightly to double the good stats of a console or practical computer all in one package, sort of like getting better acceleration, top speed, braking, steering, endurance, and fuel efficiency.   But if you go this route, you better know what you're doing.  Optimizing one setting usually undermines another.  And imagine mixing Inch and centimeter gears in the transmission, a headache.


If you want to win drag strip contests you build a car one way.  Track races with long straightaways, another way, a curvy road race, another way, an offroad race, yet another way, and the only way you can make more money that you lose is if you know what you're doing.   But most people don't want to win races.  Most people just want to get from point A to Point B.   A Mac and console combo gets you there with minimal headaches and hiccups.   Some people quickly heal from hiccups and headaches, the top 10% (in the days when a PC meant DOS and the real gaming computers were Commodore 64 and Atari 800) to the top 33% in tech savviness.   Everyone else who wants both a practical computer and a gaming system should separate those 2 functions.


As time goes on, Macs are cheaper, Gaming systems are more versatile, and PCs get more user friendly.  Compare a Mac, a PC and a console NOW compared to a Commodore 64/Atari 800, a 1984 Macintosh, and a Colecovision The second set of 3 look more different from each other compared to the modern Mac, PC, and PS4/X1/WiiU.


I'm not saying PC's aren't great.  I'm just saying, for certain people, it's not worth the hassle.


Finally consoles "standardize" the experience for competitive gaming.   It's like the difference between Indy Cars and NASCARs   Indy Cars (PC Games) are just as much about the machine as the man, whereas NASCAR (console gaming content, and Macintosh practical programs) is more about the man and less about the machine.    That's why contests that test man most purely are console games, like your fighting games.  That's why WCG used consoles  for the Ultimate Gamer.  It was a test of man (or woman) .  That's why MMMApplesauce and Zophar321 are popular gamers on nationwide non-gaming-specific TV, and (someone can fill in the blank for popular PC team games) are forgotten once their game of choice is abandoned, unless they are versatile enough, and then they can compete in WCG Ultimate Gamer. (even though it's gone, there will be a similar contest later, mark my words.  I'm starting a local TV contest in Cleveland sponsored by a game shop, and Zophar321 will be the "house contestant", think Ben Stein on a joystick instead of answering questions.  But even if mine fails, someone will pick something like it up somewhere.)

Sifer2
Sifer2

Yeah I grew up with consoles. In the last decade I was both a PC gamer and a console gamer. But as time goes on, and most console games get ported to PC I find myself more an more just going PC only. I'm not even sure I will buy a console this gen. Planning on just going all out on a high end PC this time. As a platform it's really rising to become the ultimate destination for hardcore gamers. The only thing it lacks is numbers. I hope that more of the large console audience will find there way over to PC. It seems to be happening as Steams userbase is going up at a rapid rate.


Oh, and this video doesn't really mention modding. It's unofficial but it's a major feature of the platform compared to consoles. DOTA really started as a user made mod for example.

Colin Frazier
Colin Frazier

It's too bad that the PS3 was more powerful than most PC's when it came out then, huh?

Colin Frazier
Colin Frazier

I'd rather deal with any fans that give reasons as to why they hate something. The Sony fans who say "Xbox sucks" are annoying and the Microsoft fans who say "here come the Sony fanboys" are equally as annoying. PC is definitely the worst, though.

crymore_noob
crymore_noob

Some people recommend Consoles over PC for its 'dedicated titles' like Halo, Uncharted..


But can consoles play World of warcraft? Can you have the same fun playing BF4 as in PC?


If you are a gamepad maniac, just get an Xbox360 game pad and play on PC. Hell lot more fun than Xbox360. Far superior graphics with better frame rates.



mbloof
mbloof

Keven did hit on many of the PC's strong points: the library of compatible titles cross multiple generations of Consoles and portable gaming systems, the games can be less expensive, modern Haswell equipped laptops can play most titles on LOW or reduced settings, (offering portability Consoles don't have) and while you CAN toss a few $kilobuck$ at a top %1 of the gaming public high end rig, you don't really HAVE to unless you want to.


There are however two (if not three) downsides of PC gaming. Namely: 

99% of PC games are designed for one player per PC - while it may be possible your going to have a hard time finding titles that support 2 let alone 4 game pads attached to it at the same time. (Nintendo, Sony and MS Consoles do have a few titles that support multiple players playing on the same console at the same time)


If your doing most of your gaming in someone else living room and their TV you might get away with having a Console sitting on top of/under/next to the VCR/DVD/Blueray player but might have a hard time selling a full sized PC and all the cables+noise. Granted quieter and smaller HTPC's can be had/built but might also be a hard sell. 


Last but not least on many consoles (at least my PS3 acts this way) I can plug in a recently purchased game and start playing. On a PC the purchased game disk seems to be nothing more than ether a: Uplay, Origin or Steam client which THEN downloads a copy of the game. If you have a slow (or non existent) internet connection your not playing anytime soon. If there are compatibility issues with your system and the game you may not be playing anytime soon. If your PC has any number of configuration or setup issues you may not be playing anytime soon. Simply put the Consoles work/act more like a "appliance" then a PC does.


As a disclaimer, I game on a number of devices: Top 1% PC, PS3, 3 generations of Nintendo handhelds, iPad and iPhone and even my 14" Macbook Pro. It all depends on where you are, how much time you have and what kind of gaming your into and want to play.

bruta
bruta

cant wait for mine to melt in witcher 3

#PC MASTER RACE

TalesOfGod
TalesOfGod

Unfortunately, he forgot to mention that there are no JRPG games on the PC.

Probably my biggest problem with it.


Also, he didn't mention Total war, Mount and Blade, Blazblue and Melty Blood which are all great games/series on PC.

sam_diego
sam_diego

Who is the girl with blue hair on the background in the top page? (or from which game she is from?)

ClevernameX
ClevernameX

I was a hardcore PC gamer, but the article is correct, it can be very costly. PC is the ideal platform, but the convenience of a console is slightly more appealing to me. But oh how I miss the Civilization games.

donmega1
donmega1

pc is awesome. even more so in the past than now but still the best imo. but you really gotta have them all. while you can be fine owning just one type of device, id still want to have  a console. 

Mr_BillGates
Mr_BillGates

I love to beg for games. So PC for MEEEEE!

baxwam
baxwam

because its truly the best gaming platform out there if you have an brain  

jonmar
jonmar

Great article Kevin. In addition to that I would mention that even when sometimes a game gets released that is riddled with game breaking bugs the ability to mod games on the PC means that very often the community will fix those games even after the developer has abandoned the title. A great example of this is Oblivion. The community fixed something like 800 bugs or so in the game that Bethesda did nothing about and they also made numerous other improvements to the game. Console players never got to experience all that awesomeness. Then there are games like Orbiter that would never get made on the console market yet are really unique and even educational.

mr_nee
mr_nee

PC PRO - cheaper games.

PC CONS 

  - bugs, crashes, compatibility issues

    - can't run awsome PS games

Caldrin
Caldrin

@Angryduck67 I see you stating you still play your PS2 but not the PC you had back then.. well you could have kept that PC exactly how it was and carried on playing the games you had for it just fine like you do with the PS2.

1. There are more quality games on PC than on console.

2. Well we are not missing anything i find most jap games to be pretty boring these days, all the good ones from the past are available on PC.


3. Yes you can, Steam offeres a very nice GUI that you can use a control pad to navigate. Setup a small form factor PC with a nice SSD drive and it will boost faster than your console. 


4. Its not pointless really, I was working away the other month and i used my works Laptop, intel i3 processor 4gb ram and an intergrated intel graphics card to play world of tanks. That worked just fine, sure I had to turn the graphics down but it still ran with good fps. For a £300 laptop I was impressed, plus I was connected to a voice coms system called mumble, had skype open, had IE open and was working on a remote desktop connection to a server between games. I could not do that on a PS4.


Now dont get me wrong if you just want the ease of jumping on your sofa pressing a button and only playing games then yeah a console is the best option for anyone and also the cheaper option. If you want the best of the best then you go with a nice PC gamnig rig that will cost a bit more than a console.

sammoth
sammoth

@tripletopper Funny, I have been in IT for 20+ years and hardly had any virus issues. Know why ? Being informed about it. Being protective about your OS. MAC's are not invulnerable to viruses they are just the least hacked. MAC's in the old days sucked. They did have crashes. They had complete system failure. They have however gotten better but, still are in no way close to a gaming platform of choice. MAC are never going to be cheaper because like consoles (for the most part) use proprietary hardware. So yes you are limited on your choices.

s3as3a
s3as3a

@Sifer2  Perhaps a Steam Machine is what you want (because it is a PC that is designed to behave like a console)?

pyro1245
pyro1245

@crymore_noob  you example is WoW? really? with all the awesome strategy games and stuff? okay whatever floats your boat.

crognalsen
crognalsen

@TalesOfGod  

There are some JRPGs on PC, but none are localized.  You might be able to find fans who translated them to English though.  There are also emulators.   You could argue there aren't JRPGs on other platforms either.  Nintendo is the only one that has classic JRPGs at all.  Steam does have Final Fantasy 7, 8, and the MMORPG variants..

Robsonbmw
Robsonbmw

@jonmar Gothic 3 would be another great example. Completely broken game at release, made playable after plenty of community patches.

PsV1710
PsV1710

@jonmar  Another great example is Rome II, it was broken at realease, and in a matter of days the community practically fixed the game

pyro1245
pyro1245

@mr_nee  i don't suffer any of those issues because i'm good at stuff. and not only can they run ps games, but they can run ps games at 4x the resolution. Did I just see some aliasing? no, no I did not.

sammoth
sammoth

@mr_nee Oh it can run them. Even better than a PS. Just that most are exclusive to PS. Bugs & Crashes are hardly and issue like they used to be.


Skyrim on the PS3 Nuff Said

pcty
pcty

@crognalsen @TalesOfGod I play most of my JRPGs on my PSP or PS3. You won't find a jrpg on the WiiU, escept for Earthbound which is not exactly a Wii U game.

jonmar
jonmar

@Robsonbmw @jonmarI forgot about Gothic 3! I got that on GOG not so long ago and installed the community patch for that. It's pretty awesome although the voice acting and character animations are kind of funny. But hey it's from like 2006.

pcty
pcty

@crognalsen @pctyare we talking about  old games? If that is the then I agree but the majority of the jrpgs nowadays are released on the psp/vita/ps3

crognalsen
crognalsen

@pcty  

There are a lot on Nintendo DS and a few on 3DS.  There are lots on Super Nintendo.  Many of the ones on PS1 and PS2 were remade from those versions.  Especially the Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy games.  There is a PS1, PS2, and Neo Geo emulator though.