Feature Article

Tips to Make Your PC Cool and Quiet

Quiet riot.

With the likes of Steam's Big Picture mode and better controller support making it more attractive then ever to get a gaming PC in the living room, the business of keeping that box of spinning fans and clicking hard drives quiet is essential. After all, the last thing you want while sitting down to play your favourite games on the couch is to have all the game audio pouring out of your classy surround system drowned out by the incessant whine of a cooling fan. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to quiet down a PC, which have the added benefit of keeping it cooler too. Whether it's an existing box, or a brand new build, here are our top tips for making your PC cool and quiet.

Clean Your Computer

An obvious one, perhaps, but giving your PC a thoroughly good clean is one the easiest, and cheapest ways to help reduce noise, particularly if you've had the machine a while. The fanciest things you'll need are a can of compressed air, a dust cloth, and maybe a dust buster if you have one. The vast majority of PCs will have some cooling fans on it somewhere, usually on the front and rear of the case, and inside on the CPU. Even water-cooled machines use fans to cool the liquid inside the radiator that circulates over your components. Naturally, as fans draw in air, they draw in dust too. If your components are clogged with dust, the harder your fans have to work to keep them cool, thus increasing noise.

First, look to see if your PC has removable dust filters--they're often just clipped on or attached with magnets--and give them a good clean, removing all that trapped dust. Next, open up your PC (unplug it first!) and go in with your can of compressed air or a cloth and remove the dust around fans and heatsinks inside the case. You may need to remove things like the GPU, or the CPU heatsink to give things a really good clean, but only do so if you're confident with the inner workings of a PC. A carefully placed dust buster will make short work of any large amounts of dust, but don't be too heavy handed, and remember that PC components are sensitive items!

How to do it: Remove dust filters and give them a thoroughly good clean. Open up your PC and get to work with a can of compressed air, a dust cloth, and a dust buster, cleaning up dust from around fans and heatsinks.

Do Some Cable Management

Cable management is a similarly cheap and easy way to boost airflow in your case, and thus make cooling more efficient. Typically, there are myriad of cables knocking around a PC case, connecting power and data to various components. If they're left in an untidy state, particularly if they're blocking fans, then air can't circulate, and case temperatures rise. It's a very easy fix, though, and all it takes is a few minutes of your time and some cable ties that you can pick up for mere cents.

First off, identify if your case has space behind the motherboard to stash cables. Enthusiast cases like Corsair's 450D come equipped with holes and rubber grommets so you can thread cables behind the motherboard and secure them with cable ties. Also, be aware that smaller Mini ITX cases like Bitfenix's Prodigy might look pretty on the outside, but their smaller size means there's less room for cables, which makes keeping them tidy that much trickier. But, even if your case doesn't have built in cable management, there's nothing to stop you from getting a little creative. For example, when I was building the budget AMD PC for GameSpot, I used one of the 5 1/2" drive bays of Fractal's Core 1000 case to bundle up any unused power cables.

How to do it: Grab some cable ties and find places where you can bundle cables up, or tuck them out of the way of fans, and components like the GPU or traditional spinning platter hard drives that get hot. As an added bonus, clean cabling looks far better than a random bundle of wires, especially if you have a windowed case.

Upgrade Your CPU and GPU Cooling

If cleaning and cable tidying don't help, then it might be time to look at buying a few new bits and pieces to help keep your PC quiet. The two noisiest parts of PC tend to be the CPU and GPU, because they run the hottest, and all that heat needs to be dispersed as efficiently as possible. If you've got a standard, off-the-shelf PC, it's more than likely it'll come equipped with a stock CPU cooler supplied by the CPU manufacturer. The same will apply if you bought a retail CPU from a store that came with a cooler in the box.

While these coolers mostly do their job just fine, they're designed to a budget, and to do nothing more than keep your PC's CPU within tolerable temperatures: noise and efficiency tend to be an afterthought. Fortunately, it's not too tricky to swap a CPU cooler, although, you'll need to be reasonably proficient with a screwdriver and comfortable working inside your PC case. There are numerous types of CPU cooler to choose from, including excellent air coolers from the likes Noctua and all-in-one water-cooling setups from Corsair.

The one thing they have in common is that they increase the surface area for heat to dissipate. This means heat is more efficiently moved away from the CPU, and because they use larger fans, more air is moved at slower fan speeds, making your PC quieter. Things are a little trickier on the GPU side, in that it's difficult to change their cooling systems. That said, it's not impossible, and if you're confident with PC building there are third-party solutions like Arctic's Accelero Xtreme IV you can fit to an existing GPU. Alternatively, if you're putting together a new PC, get a GPU with either Nvidia's excellent all-metal cooler or a decent third-party solution. You can read more about GPU cooling in our guide on how to pick the right GPU for your PC.

How to do it: If you're using a stock CPU cooler, look into a buying a new one from the likes of Noctua or Corsair, which will make cooling more efficient, and therefore quieter. Invest in a GPU with a decent cooling system, or--if you're confident with PC building--kit out your GPU with a new cooler like Arctic's Accelero Xtreme IV.

Upgrade Your Fans and Consider Airflow

PC fans come in all shapes, sizes, and colours. While they're not the most glamorous of purchases and it might be tempting to just go for the cheapest you can find, or the ones with the brightest LEDs, investing in a decent set of fans can work wonders on the noise levels of your PC, and how efficiently it's cooled. Before you splurge all your cash on Newegg, though, it's good to take a look at just how the air is being moved through your PC. A typical mid-tower case will have a couple of fans on the front, with an exhaust in the back. Ideally, you want air to flow in one direction from the front of case, over your components, and then dissipate out the back. Some cases have fans on the side or on the bottom as intakes, which help move things along.

If there are more fans bringing air in than exhausting it, it's called positive air pressure. This is often the preferred method for cooling, because it's far better at keeping dust out of your PC, making cooling efficient and quiet. The higher pressure of air inside the case means it's forced out of various other unfiltered holes and vents on your PC--aside from the exhaust fan--where dust can easily escape, preventing it from entering the case. With this is mind, take a look at how your PC is currently cooled, and whether fans are blowing air out or sucking it in and adjust accordingly. You might choose to add more fans, which makes for better cooling, but will be noisier, so choose wisely.

Next look at the fans themselves. Cheaper fans are typically noisier and less efficient then their slightly pricier counterparts. When buying a fan, look at specs like airflow, noise level, and static pressure. Airflow is expressed in cubic feet per minute (CFM). The higher the number, the more air that fan can move, which is better for cooling. Noise level is expressed in dBA, and here the lower the number the quieter the fan. Anything around 20 dBA is regarded as a quiet fan, although, there's no standard method between manufacturers for testing this, so it's best to look at reviews online before taking the plunge. Static pressure is measured in units of mmH2O. The higher this number is, the more force the fan can exert on an object, which is important if you're mounting your fan next to something that will block some of its airflow, such as a water cooling radiator, CPU heat sink, or an hard drive cage.

Fan size is also important. Typically, PC cases are equipped with 120mm fans, but you can often swap these out for 140mm versions or larger. Have a look at where your fan is mounted and see if there are extra mounting holes around it, which means you should be able to fit a larger fan. Some cases even feature mounts for fans as large as 200mm. The larger the fan, the more air it can move at a lower speed, which is exactly what you want for a quieter PC. Also, look at what speed your fans are running at. Sometimes, if your motherboard settings are incorrectly adjusted, fans will run at full speed all the time, which is horribly loud. The same thing will happen if you hook up a fan directly to your power supply via a Molex connector without a separate fan controller. There are too many variances in motherboards to go into how to change fan settings here, but dive into your motherboard manual and make sure that your fans are automatically adjusting their speed based on a certain temperature threshold.

Finally, invest in some dust filters for your intake fans if your PC doesn't come equipped with them, and screw them in with the aid of silicone fan fasteners, which will help dampen out any vibrations. If you're rocking a lot of fans in your PC, then a separate fan controller that mounts in a spare drive bay will give you instant control over their speed.

How to do it: Look at how the air flows through your case and aim for positive air pressure. Invest in bigger fans where possible, and look at specs like airflow, noise level, and static pressure when making a purchase. Dust filters and silicone fan fasteners are cheap ways of improving cooling and reducing noise.

Acoustic Foam, Hard Drives, and the Rest

If you're still not satisfied with the noise performance of your PC, you can look into attaching sheets of acoustic foam to the inside of your case from manufacturers like AcousticPack to help dampen noise. If you do use them, just be careful not to restrict airflow inside your case. Some cases like Fractal's Define R4 come with acoustic foam pre-installed, should you not wish to do the dirty work. Noisy PC components like hard drives can be housed in things like Arctic's HC01 hard drive silencer, but if your hard drive is particularly old and noisy, you're better off looking to replace it with a new one. Or, better yet, go for an SSD, which will be miles quicker, and--thanks to a lack of moving parts--completely silent.

Power supply units can often be another source of noise, particularly in cheaper models. We're going to be taking a more in-depth look at PSUs at a later date, but suffice to say, don't cheap out on it! Look for 80-plus rated units from reputable manufacturers like Corsair and Silverstone, and study the same fan stats like airflow and noise level to help you choose the right one for you. If you really want the quietest gaming PC around, though, then the absolute best solution is to look at water-cooling the whole thing. That's a whole other world of PC building to dive into, though, something we'll be investigating at a later date.

How to do it: Acoustic foam is a cheap way to dampen noise, but watch that you're not reducing airflow in your case. Consider replacing spinning platter drives with SSDs, and make sure your PSU is up to snuff.

Written By

Discussion

306 comments
mxgod
mxgod

My computer has 1 intake open for air in the front on the bottom. then 1 fan each on the CPU and Graphics card  and 1 exhaust fan (top back)  that creates a suction kinda airflow like a vacuum (also only back opening for air). No problems yet and inside is keeping pretty cool. I had cases with a lot more air-hole openings and those ran 10 or more degrees(c) hotter. (Does need to get blown out fairly often though.. maybe once every two months due to the whole "vacuum" type thing but I like it :D

Accuracy158
Accuracy158

Awwe cute... gamespot trying to proove they're PC enthusiasts again.  (I'm mostly just teasing.  At least they are puting some effort into it when I lot of websites would focus on consoles.) :P


Sent here by ASUS tweet.

Ansonicus
Ansonicus

I really enjoy these PC tip/gametech articles. They are interesting to read, I don't think I got anything new from this one but all of them have at least been informative in some way.

Psycold
Psycold

Just get a flat head screw driver and shove it into your computer case with extreme force, it will create speed holes and...overclocking. 

blackothh
blackothh

Clean your fans often, it will help with the life of the fans because dust can build up on the blades and cause 2 problems. First, they will become out of balance and that will wear out the bearings quicker causing more noise down the road and potentially stopping the fan from working. Second, just the dust on the blades will cause extra noise from interfering with the airflow.

esett
esett

The only tip you need: Buy all your fans from Noctua.

In the case of Hard drives you can make them 100 % silent by putting them on top of a piece of sponge (any kind will do, even regular kitchen sponges).

zyxahn
zyxahn

Why do you have it on.  If you are trying to sleep then shut it off.  I have mine on because I listen to ASMR videos.  Headphones make quick work of the fan noise.  Yes I can sleep with phones on.  Draw you own conclusions there.  >_<

rflorez
rflorez

What's the brand of those cool looking fans?

edgardpoe
edgardpoe

another cheap idea!:

1. Cover your ears with headphones

2. Blow on your PC once in a while

SwiftusMaximus
SwiftusMaximus

For a case with excellent sound dampening, lots of space for air flow, i highly recommend considering the Fractal Design Define R4 Black Pearl case, a very solid, sensible design and price.

In conjunction with Noctua cooler/fans installed, this rig runs whisper quiet, very impressive.

Good gaming.

lionheart051
lionheart051

The upgrading and continual maintenance of my PC is getting annoying and expensive. I'm really thinking of moving back to consoles.

oflow
oflow

how much are the 800 series gpu and the new intel chipset going to run?


Duttyhandz
Duttyhandz

Seriously, Mark, a dust buster to clean a computer. You should know better than that. You must never get a dust buster anywhere near the internal components of a computer, as the motor generate a strong electro-static field which could (and most likely) discharge on your components. NEVER EVER USE A DUST BUSTER OR ANY VACUUM CLEANERS INSIDE YOUR COMPUTER !

MrFreehuggs
MrFreehuggs

No matter what you do, you can't make your PC cool... Haha GET IT?

fbgbdk4
fbgbdk4

The fan inside my power supply  is noisy as hell... I'm postponing opening it up for months...

bignick217
bignick217

Very well done Mark on this article.  You have no idea how many of my friends who are first time builders get the cooling wrong on their PC and end up with either loud PC's or overheat because they either have too little cooling or enough, but not setup properly.  You've covered most of the important details quite well.  Such as always have intakes at the front, bottom and side.  And the exhausts at the top and back.  There is another reason for this setup that many don't realize and that is because as air warms it naturally rises, so it's best to go with this and create a flow that comes in cool from the front, bottom and side, and then out through the top and back.  So very well done covering those bases.


There is one thing I would recommend adding to the section about acoustic dampening material (which I highly recommend BTW).  Most of the noise coming from fans in a case are not actually from the fans themselves.  Most of it is actually coming from vibrations from the fans reverberating through the metal housing of the case.  So not only is it a good idea to install material on the walls, but anywhere where you have large surface areas of bear metal.  Obviously, you don't want to install material on the motherboard plate wall under the motherboard.  Don't be stupid.  But if you have a case that can have EATX motherboards installed, but you only ever intend to use ATX, then that extra surface area is definitely a good place to install some material.  The back of the case is also a good place for some smartly positioned material.  The bottom as well.  The trick is to install it in a way that dampens any vibrations without interfering with any of the install points for components and without blocking air vents.  You DO NOT have to completely cover a surface area in order to significantly dampen the noise being generated through it.  Sometimes as little as a strip of material will make all the difference in the world.  Think strategically.  And for that inevitable question.  NO, Acoustic dampening material will not increase the temperature of your case PROVIDED you DO NOT cover any of the cases air vents.  Think of it like trying to run the heater full blast in the middle of winter with all of you windows and doors open in the house.  Same principle.


I also second and highly recommend Marks highlighting of Acousti's AcoustiPack.  Not AcousticPack.  It's AcoustiPack without the c.  You can find it on QuietPC.co.uk.  I have 13 fans in my computer running at all times.  (7 Case Fans, 2 on CPU Cooler, 3 on GPU, 1 on PSU in a Cosmos S case, And a couple of my friends have made comments that it's quieter than their PC with just 2 fans (which surprised the hell out of me consider just how open a case the Cosmos S is.)  I can not recommend Acousti's products highly enough.  Provided it's installed properly with good forethought, it will work wonders for noise levels.  Just don't get the wrong idea.  It will take several hours to install it properly.  It actually took me over 7 hours to meticulously install the material in my case.  In case anyone's interested here's an example of dampening material properly installed.  I think you'll understand why it took me over 7 hours from the pics.


http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/case-mods-worklog-gallery/33475-my-pc-refit-cosmos-s-gaming-spec.html


This is a fairly old post, but it's still the case I use today although I'm using completely different components today.  The only difference in the case today compared back when I took those pics is that I've added a second hard drive cage and fan since then and have much better cable management now.  And yes, I've installed dampening material on the hard drive cages as well.  You can barely hear my hard drives.  And I can't look at that spaghetti junction of cables in those pics now without facepalming myself in disbelief that I ever actually allowed that to be acceptable.  I hope this info helps others who had any lingering questions regarding dampening material.


And one last thing.  After installing the material in the case.  Be prepared for a much heavier computer.  The dampening material is very dense and will add a lot of weight to your computer.  Surprised the hell out of me.  My girlfriend can't lift my computer as a result.  Which comes in very handy to know when she threatens to take my computer and hide it from me lol.  I just respond, you have to lift it first, so have fun!

Merkasaw
Merkasaw

It's a little frustrating that this article only dealt with positive air pressure in a case and not negative. Yes, positive tends to result in less dust, but it generally provides worse cooling performance and can lead to static air pockets building up.


Negative pressure (more exhaust than intake) is actually the preferred method, which is why most high-end PC cases come equipped with dust filters.

See here for more information:

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/cooling-air-pressure-heatsink,review-32320-5.html

raikiry
raikiry

Is your gaming PC keeping you up at night? Then turn it off!

Gamer_4_Fun
Gamer_4_Fun

I removed AD blocker from Gamespot from the past few days. IGN will always be heavily blocked lol.

Ripper_TV
Ripper_TV

Too much effort and money. Just put it in another room.

AuronAXE
AuronAXE

I've been loving these PC oriented articles lately! I have a well managed Cooler Master HAF932 and I have to say that dusting it at least once a month is a huge benefit, especially since the case comes with 4 fans already installed.

dannydopamine8
dannydopamine8

Idk why people waste money putting third party heatsinks on their processors. Intel and amd stock heatsinks work just fine, they have to work. They are made for schools, businesses, colleges.. Every PC on earth has either amd or intel. The heatsinks have to work. And the stock thermal paste is fine too.


And overclocking a cpu is just not worth it, you get the same framerate before and after.. I used to do it just to see benchmark score differences. But in real world performance there is no difference and no real performance improvement in games or anything. Most cpu's today never even get used past 60% while gaming anyways..

Plus you have to manually alter the balanced power saving mode the chip is designed for


And liquid cooling is just going full nerd on a whole new level. If you want to put water inside your $2000 rig knock yourself out. Things like that just give PC world that unnecessary "expensive" perception

ChiefReaver
ChiefReaver

@lionheart051 Umm, that would be your fault. Stop being such an impulse buyer every time new parts come out, and stop thinking every game needs to run at bleeding-edge settings if you can't afford it. There is no reason why a $600+ machine shouldn't last you an entire console generation.

vegard1985
vegard1985

@Duttyhandz I have been (carefully) vacuum cleaning my computers for over 10 years without a single incident. Just keep a distance to the components and set it to low power.

WereCatf
WereCatf

@tekkenboss Do they resort to paying people and/or bots to spam these kinds of websites just to get traffic to their site? I certainly avoid any websites that have to resort to such, it generates the opposite of the kind of effect they want.

Lach0121
Lach0121

@bignick217 nice post!


Yea I feel you on everything, although my next case will have the sound material already in it. Nanoxia Deep Silence 1, as it is highly regarded as quiet & cool in the music production scene, and they are more strict about how loud a pc is than gamers are!

Vexov
Vexov

@raikiry I'm gonna need a review on how to turn off a PC. :D

Duttyhandz
Duttyhandz

@SergioMCC  Wow, what a great spamming post. You are really part of the problem...

snaketus
snaketus

@Ripper_TV Lazy people. Best route is to make it cool and quite, but when you are not using it, turn it off.

Johny_47
Johny_47

@AuronAXE I agree. I got a Coolermaster CM Storm case for my own built pc and it's alright for a mid tower, bit cramped for cable management but once it's done it's done =P


The video card cooling is standard and the cpu cooling is the old corsair h50.


Since I've been driving, I kind of neglected physically cleaning my pc thoroughly so I just use a vacuum cleaner once a month on it. 

I took it all apart, I mean everything, back in april sometime and it'd been a year since doing this. 

The article helped shed some light about the set up of the fans a bit better because there's more fans blowing into than out of the case and only around the radiator and fan and the back of the case(that blows out) there was a massive build up of dust.

chibi-acer
chibi-acer

@dannydopamine8 I don't overclock my PC, but the stock Intel coolers are still junk.  They're noisy and don't do nearly as good a job as 3rd party heatsinks. It's not even like good heatsinks are that expensive.  You can get really good ones for $30.  Thermal paste is $1.


The top selling PC manufacturers, HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc don't use stock Intel coolers either.

WereCatf
WereCatf

@dannydopamine8 "Idk why people waste money putting third party heatsinks on their processors. Intel and amd stock heatsinks work just fine, they have to work. They are made for schools, businesses, colleges.. Every PC on earth has either amd or intel. The heatsinks have to work. And the stock thermal paste is fine too." -- The stock coolers are effing noisy. A higher-end cooler can hold the CPU just as cool as a stock cooler, but run much quieter.

godfather830
godfather830

@dannydopamine8  You're right, but overclocking was never done out of necessity. It's just a hobby for PC enthusiasts.

Duttyhandz
Duttyhandz

@ChiefReaver @lionheart051  Woh, so you're telling me that a 600$ computer bought in 2005 (year the X360 was released) is running Watchdogs today, with no upgrades since then... I'd like to see that.

Duttyhandz
Duttyhandz

@vegard1985 @Duttyhandz  The equivalent of what you're saying in the driving world : "I've been driving at 150mph for over 10 years without a single accident" (so this is a proof by itself that it is safe...).


Well, go on and drive at 150mph if you don't care about the risk, but please, don't imply that it is a safe behavior in any way because YOU didn't have any problem doing so.


Use compressed air cans or, in the best world, an air compressor. You can get what is called a "pancake" air compressor of +/- 3Gallons/100PSI for under 100$ (and if you search a bit, there are often sales on these, as I bought mine for 50$). Those are more than enough for little home uses (like dusting off your electronics, inflating bike tires, basketballs, etc.).


And at roughly 5$ per can of compressed air, you will quickly get into your money with a compressor as you can hardly dust off a full rig efficiently with a single can.


Simply be sure when cleaning a fan you're "restraining" it in some way (I usually use a pen to "block" the pales) so you prevent any overspin of the fan, which can somehow damage it by causing it to "wabble", making some unwanted noise afterwards.

lilflipp
lilflipp

@vegard1985 @Duttyhandz Also try to vacuum it while you're standing on a carpet rubbing your feet on it and while your computer is running.

torrne667
torrne667

Especially if you use amd processors. I got an fx 8350 and it is an awesome chip for the price but Is HELLA hot! Caused my pc to shut off as soon as it reached 63c with the stock cooler and sounded like a effing aircraft taking off. I replaced it with an akasa tower cooler and it now runs battlefield 4 on ultra and doesn't even reach 45c.

JachAnen
JachAnen

@Duttyhandz @ChiefReaver @lionheart051 If that 360 haven't reached RROD since it's release, I doubt it was worth buying since it obviously haven't been used much since purchase. The PC however would need no parts along the way and would cost less than 2 360's. Especially if they have to run Watch_Dogs just as well. But I would rather use a little more cash so it's a little more expensive than 2 360's, but I get enjoy every game in higher quality, especially with mods.

lilflipp
lilflipp

@Duttyhandz @vegard1985 :P All kidding asides. I've been playing with PC for a good decade. I've had nearly every possible problem I can at this point, which is a good thing because I can recognize a lot of issues when they happen.


I use tweezers to delicately pull off the biggest pieces of coton/dust however you call. You know the layers that often end up over heatsinks. Then I use a dustcan to lightly spray the inside of the case 2-3 times only. Just so all the tiny dust particles fly around while I hold the vacuum just outside the case so it picks up the dust that went air born. And I don't usually go beyond that and I've never had a problem.


But after years of doing it, you kind of get lazy. Recently I had my computer running I was watching Halt and Catch Fire and I didn't want to interrupt my show so.... yeah I did it and I got overly careless I remove the front panel of the case, and was sticking the end of the vacuum inside the case, wasn't touching any components, only the case. Was still being super careless because nothing bad ever happened so I could afford to be careless and then I heard a "click" and computer shut down. Pushing the power button didn't do anything and all I could think was "Idiot! You fried your PC because you're a lazy idiot!" Great now I have to test everything component to find out what is broken, which is kind of painful, on top of that, I can't even finish watching the show.

I turned the PSU switch on and off and it boot and luckily, everything was fine.


Moral of the story: Won't be doing it again.

y0j1m30
y0j1m30

@tekkenboss @WereCatf Comments are for discussions about the articles nothing more. Such "advertising" methods to make me question the legitimacy of your site.

Duttyhandz
Duttyhandz

@JachAnen @Duttyhandz @ChiefReaver @lionheart051  Ok...

1) RROD were covered by Microsoft even after warranty at no charge

2) So, if your PC need no parts, here is what you imply you bought in november 2005 and still use today to run Watchdog or Dark Souls 2 for example :

- Your CPU is a T24xx CoreDuo running at 2Ghz (I'm giving you a couple month in advance here, as that CPU was released 02/2006), a 32-bit CPU with a mere 533 FSB(selling at launch for something around 250$...)

-You have 4GB max of RAM (DDR2 ram by the way) (and in that time, a kit of 2 1GB DIMMS was going around 150$, so 300$ of memory)

-You have XP or Vista(...) as an OS

-You have  a 7800 GTX with 512MB DDR3 GPU supporting at max DX9...(and that card alone was more expensive than a 360 back then, it was more than 600$) or you have the ATI rival of the time like a X1800

-You have some hard drive running most likely at SATA1 speed, but let's pretend you have a SATA2 hard drive(which, in the case of hard drive from this time, doesn't change much...) which is now 8-9 years old and still working (lucky you!), it is something like a 250GB hard drive that cost around 100$ at the end of 2005.


So, with the above computer, which by the way cost a lot more than the 400$USD the 360 was selling for at launch in november 2005 without even taking into account a motherboard or a case, you can run Dark Souls 2 or WatchDogs. The above computer is not even close to the minimum specs of those games.


So, with a PC that cost roughly a 1000$(more than two 360s at launch cost) back in the end of 2005, and I'm pretty conservative here as I don't take in consideration the motherboards, case or Windows licence, you can't possibly think of running as effectively today's game as a 360 or a PS3 still can.