The Razer Lycosa

When I first got to see the Razer Lycosa keyboard it was when I asked Hardware Editor James Yu if he had a USB keyboard I could borrow. You see, it was game night and the PS3 does not recognize any kind of keyboard except those that connect either via bluetooth or USB. Truth be told, typing text...

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When I first got to see the Razer Lycosa keyboard it was when I asked Hardware Editor James Yu if he had a USB keyboard I could borrow. You see, it was game night and the PS3 does not recognize any kind of keyboard except those that connect either via bluetooth or USB. Truth be told, typing text messages with the sixaxis is an exercise in frustration for me.

James handed over the black box containing the Lycosa keyboard. When I got back to my desk I plugged it in, and proceeded to begin typing out messages aplenty. The keyboard was light and well balanced on my lap. In the dark of the after-hours office, the keys were very impressive and easy to find thanks to soft blue backlighting. After an hour with the soft keys I knew I had to get one for myself.

After returning the keyboard to James, I inquired if he had another one. He said no, but later darkened my door to tell me I could use the one I borrowed if I wrote a hands-on for the hardware blog. After spending more time with the Lycosa, I came to understand how clacky other keyboards sound. While the keys are firm, the resistance isn't too much and the noise is all but negligible. Their texture couldn't really be much softer if it was covered in silk, but I never noticed problems with slipping thanks to Razer's trademarked non-slip hyperesponse technology. Sure I've fat-fingered more than my fair share of entries since I've used the board, but that is user error not design flaw.

The keyboard supports additional devices via USB, audio in, and audio out ports on the top of the unit. I plugged in my headphones and my laser mouse. While I opted out of leaving my headset's microphone jack plugged in, the pickups worked. The mouse is just as responsive and the convenience of having all of the inputs going through one source was not much of a problem. While I had some minor static through my headset, it was more of a function of having a smartphone, an SD video capture deck, and two high-end consoles running within relatively close proximity. Most times it isn't a problem since I run my computer's audio primarily out of some desktop speakers that i can easily disconnect to switch to the headset.

Utlimately, the keyboard offers numerous customization options. Multiple profiles can be set up and accessed via the Touchpanel above the 10-key cluster on the right. These profiles can be easily customized for use in various games. The macro features are also equally beneficial when using graphics design programs as they are graphically intense games. All around the Lycosa's on-screen programming and profile set-up make it simple to make the keyboard do what you want it to do.

With a detachable wrist rest, a thin profile, and a lot of sexy design, the Razer Lycosa gaming keyboard is hard not to recommend. As long as you have a PC with a built-in USB port, a CD-Rom drive, 35 megabytes of free hard disk space and are running Windows XP, x64, Vista, or Vista64, you should have not problem making the most of this elegant and powerful keyboard.

Discussion

14 comments
thedisturbedwol
thedisturbedwol

Sorry Bozanimal, I meant to give you the thumbs up. Really like the Yoda reference.

skinntech
skinntech

great keyboard I've had mine for a couple months now and a few lans. the only problem is the damn thing grows legs and ends up on my friends desk's at lans. while there g15 sits in there bags. everyone that uses mine usually buys one. It's quick, light, and really responsive. in my opinion its price is a little high but justifiable. I also used a g15 and microsoft ergo and i like this better.

mattgressel
mattgressel

I'll stick with my G15 Gamer keyboard with flip down LCD Screen ;)

vcvlts
vcvlts

The retail price is $79.99 but you can get it for less if you shop around.

wand222
wand222

im too lazy to read the whole segment, about how much does it cost?

lucebuce
lucebuce

this keyboard looks SWEET , this and the Darwin might be the only 2 things il buy after reading its review and previews at gamespot

ord1000
ord1000

I actually didn't like this keyboard much at all. My main gripe with the Lycosa is the brightness level of the backlit keys. It looks great when it does the WASD cluster for the FPS fans out there, however when it lights up the other keys it looks very poor and hard to see. The reason for this is that the WASD cluster is twice as bright compared to when the rest of the keys are lit. You really have to look directly above the keys to see what they are. Another annoyance is the touch panel media controls, which can be irritating as the panel controls like fast forward and stop are to close together. Not good if you have big fingers. I kept my Razer Tarantula keyboard as I just think it's the better out of the two. However it looks good and the non slip surface of the keys are nice.

HufflePuff-TLH
HufflePuff-TLH

uhmmm looks nice, might look more into that one. -thanks for showing.

Gruug
Gruug

I like this keyboard but I have one minor peeve. As I use it a lot in shooters, the wasd keys tend to lose the black finish. My "D" key currently looks like a bright blue blob. Other then that, I have no issues.

Bozanimal
Bozanimal

Error: [QUOTE="Donkeljohn"]He said no, but later darkened my door to tell me I could the one I borrowed if I wrote this blog.[/QUOTE] You could what: borrow, have, steal? Error: [QUOTE="Donkeljohn"]...you should have not problem making the most of this elegant and powerful keyboard.[/QUOTE] Yoda approves of this sentence, "Do or do not, there is no try."

UrFaceIzDum
UrFaceIzDum

OOO very nice keyboard, I've been looking for a new keyboard myself, and that one looks and sounds like a winner.

Donkeljohn
Donkeljohn

When I first got to see the Razer Lycosa keyboard it was when I asked Hardware Editor James Yu if he had a USB keyboard I could borrow. You see, it was game night and the PS3 does not recognize any kind of keyboard except those that connect either via bluetooth or USB. Truth be told, typing text messages with the sixaxis is an exercise in frustration for me.

James handed over the black box containing the Lycosa keyboard. When I got back to my desk I plugged it in, and proceeded to begin typing out messages aplenty. The keyboard was light and well balanced on my lap. In the dark of the after-hours office, the keys were very impressive and easy to find thanks to soft blue backlighting. After an hour with the soft keys I knew I had to get one for myself.

After returning the keyboard to James, I inquired if he had another one. He said no, but later darkened my door to tell me I could use the one I borrowed if I wrote a hands-on for the hardware blog. After spending more time with the Lycosa, I came to understand how clacky other keyboards sound. While the keys are firm, the resistance isn't too much and the noise is all but negligible. Their texture couldn't really be much softer if it was covered in silk, but I never noticed problems with slipping thanks to Razer's trademarked non-slip hyperesponse technology. Sure I've fat-fingered more than my fair share of entries since I've used the board, but that is user error not design flaw.

The keyboard supports additional devices via USB, audio in, and audio out ports on the top of the unit. I plugged in my headphones and my laser mouse. While I opted out of leaving my headset's microphone jack plugged in, the pickups worked. The mouse is just as responsive and the convenience of having all of the inputs going through one source was not much of a problem. While I had some minor static through my headset, it was more of a function of having a smartphone, an SD video capture deck, and two high-end consoles running within relatively close proximity. Most times it isn't a problem since I run my computer's audio primarily out of some desktop speakers that i can easily disconnect to switch to the headset.

Utlimately, the keyboard offers numerous customization options. Multiple profiles can be set up and accessed via the Touchpanel above the 10-key cluster on the right. These profiles can be easily customized for use in various games. The macro features are also equally beneficial when using graphics design programs as they are graphically intense games. All around the Lycosa's on-screen programming and profile set-up make it simple to make the keyboard do what you want it to do.

With a detachable wrist rest, a thin profile, and a lot of sexy design, the Razer Lycosa gaming keyboard is hard not to recommend. As long as you have a PC with a built-in USB port, a CD-Rom drive, 35 megabytes of free hard disk space and are running Windows XP, x64, Vista, or Vista64, you should have not problem making the most of this elegant and powerful keyboard.