Feature Article

The Most Unlikely Fighter You've Never Heard Of

Fighting is Magic

This game should not exist. The concept is just too absurd: ponies, in a fighting game? And not just any ponies, but cartoon ponies whose sole purpose is looking cute and teaching viewers about cooperation and friendship? Making them fight is a blatant contradiction that completely undermines the spirit of the show. It must be the work of an overactive fan base with too much free time.

Perhaps there is some truth to those sentiments. But the crazy thing is that against all odds, reason, and expectation, the game does exist. Fighting Is Magic, an independently developed fighting game inspired by the cartoon series My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, is real, and through the sheer determination of its developers, it's getting better every day.

It is also an easy game to pass up if you, like me, are distracted by the all-pony cast. I remember walking the floor at last year's Evolution Championship Series and spying Fighting Is Magic for the first time. Through my facial expressions alone, you could have charted my reactions all the way from "What!?" to "They can't be serious." But I was wrong. MANE6, the team behind Fighting Is Magic, was very serious: about ponies, and about building a quality game.

Pinkie Pie (left) readies her party cannon to counter Rainbow Dash's (right) hoof dive.

Part 1: Fighting is Magic

A few months later, after a second (and more open-minded) viewing, it all clicked. Each fighter had her own distinct fighting style. The animations were smooth and full of personality. And…did that pony just bust out an off-the-ground combo? In one and a half years, MANE6 has managed to execute a level of quality far exceeding any reasonable expectations.

Of course, reaching that level has not been easy. This was a group of fans first, and creators second. Between them they had precious little experience developing a game of any sort. Add in the fact that some of them were balancing full-time jobs, and all of them were paying for this out of pocket, and it becomes a wonder this game made it past a week. How did they do it, and what can this most unlikely of fighting games tell us about the genre? That story begins with a few silly pictures.

Well, technically, it begins with the cartoon. In the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic series, six talking ponies work together to discover the true meaning of friendship. They sing, throw parties, and explore the peaceful, pony-filled countryside of Ponyville. With their bright smiles, and brighter attitudes, the last thing you would expect is for these ponies to start throwing punches. However, it seems that fighting, much like friendship, holds a little magic of its own.

That magic manifested as some mock screens, shown above, for Marevel vs. Clopcom (get it?), the forerunner to Fighting Is Magic. According to their creator and future MANE6 team member, Anukan, "I never intended those screenshots to be taken seriously. I invested a total of 15 minutes and 16 seconds between getting the idea of making them from a comment on Ponibooru to the actual first execution. I look back at the horrible, tutti-frutti combo of a GUI I made for that and wonder who spiked my punch."

These images, along with several others, were posted to the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic image board, Ponychan, in a thread discussing the finer points of fighting ponies. For a select few, the idea became more than just a passing joke. One user in particular--Nappy--recognized the potential in this idea and in the creativity of the pony community. His determination to see Fighting Is Magic realized would be instrumental in the formation of MANE6.

During the summer of 2011, the group's six founding members met for the first time on Skype to discuss how two cartoon ponies would beat each other up. Alongside Nappy were Jay Wright, Lucas Ellinghaus, Anukan, James Workman, and Prominence. Together, they had lots of enthusiasm and big ideas, but only an amateur knowledge of game development and the fighting genre. Some had a few game mods and high school projects under their belt, but nothing on the scale of Fighting Is Magic.

They also had zero knowledge of their chosen game engine: 2D Fighter Maker 2002. Therefore, the first two weeks of development were spent reading tutorials (which were scarce) and experimenting. It was slow, methodical work, but gradually the pieces began to fall into place. One pony could slap another, and some health would go away. This was a good start, and it demonstrated that MANE6 could--at the very least--make a really boring fighting game. The challenge then became making it a good game, and that began with wall bounces.

"When we started messing with physics and making things bounce off of walls," recalled Nappy, "that's when my face exploded." If MANE6 could manipulate the engine to bounce a pony off a wall, they could take on the world. Fighting Is Magic could become more than just an imitation fighting game; it could actually be fun. "Having wall bounces really showed us the potential for both the game and the team," Ellinghaus said. "It was a very exciting time."

In the whirlwind weeks between the start of development and the release of the first trailer, Fighting Is Magic went through dozens of changes, revisions, and overhauls. The rigid limitations of the 2D Fighter Maker 2002 engine gave the young team plenty of headaches, but ultimately those restrictions--and their solutions--shaped the game into the smooth 2D fighter it is today.

"When we started messing with physics and making things bounce off walls," recalled Nappy, "that's when my face exploded." If MANE6 could manipulate the engine to bounce a pony off a wall, they could take on the world.

First, there was the matter of buttons. A two-button layout, a la Nintendo's Super Smash Bros., would be easy for people to grasp, but it didn't offer enough variation for the characters. A six-button configuration would have plenty of variation, but it could be too intimidating for non-fighting fans. Plus, the additional moves that would need to be designed and animated would create a mountain of extra work. This was, after all, a game MANE6 wanted to finish.

"We are catering to the fighting game community and the pony community at the same time," noted Ellinghaus. "These are traditionally two very separate communities, so we needed to find a balance that helps ease in new players while still having depth."

To that end, the team decided on a three-button system. Taking inspiration from Capcom's Vs. series, they knew they wanted chain-style combos in the game, so using a light, medium, and heavy attack layout was an easy conclusion. However, this layout revealed a serious problem.

"We also wanted a standard EX system," explained Nappy, referring to the mechanic seen in such games as Street Fighter IV where a character can execute an enhanced special move by inputting the command with two attack buttons instead of one. "But the engine had issues with certain input hardware configurations and would not detect simultaneous inputs unless they happened on the exact same frame." This made EX attacks extremely difficult to perform, so the team needed to find a work-around.

That search resulted in a fourth button: the magic button. And no, the magic button does not pull a rabbit out of a hat or do any nonsense using scarves. It simply condenses two button presses into a single input. At least, that's how it started, before it grew from a mere fix for hardware limitations into a tool for expanding the roster's fighting style.

"[The magic button] let us focus on what makes a character special," Nappy explained. "For instance, Twilight Sparkle likes to read; it's what she's known for. So pressing the magic button makes her read a book, which then refills her special meter because she is learning spells. She can then use that knowledge to unleash more-powerful attacks."

By the team's own admission, they are not "programming" the 2D Fighter Maker 2002 engine so much as "taming" it. There are rules that simply cannot be broken, but they sure can get bent and twisted in some interesting ways. However, even with the engine's limitations, MANE6 is grateful for the tools they have. "If we had started from scratch with our own engine, we would not nearly have the product we have now," admitted Wright. "We would be paralyzed by choice. Working in this engine has been a terrific problem-solving exercise for the team."

"It forces us to think laterally in that we have to create solutions that are not straightforward," said Anukan. For instance, the team wanted to make stages larger to discourage corner-carry combos, but the engine wouldn't allow it. So, instead, they gave characters the ability to roll after getting knocked down to help them escape the corner. "Sometimes we tame the engine, and sometimes it tames us."

MANE6's endless problem solving finally paid off with the release of the first Fighting Is Magic trailer. Uploaded to YouTube on June 19, 2011, the video was met with an overwhelmingly positive reaction, as described by its creators. It has since earned more than 900,000 views, and while some viewers simply "don't get it" or think the team is wasting its talents (a notably backhanded compliment), the trailer is considered MANE6's first major "hype milestone."

The fan response far outstripped the team's more conservative predictions. At best, they thought a small trickle of fans from within the pony community would take notice. What they got was a tidal wave--and not just from within the fandom. "We realized what we had in our hands and thought, 'Uh-oh, we really need to do this well,'" said Anukan. "[Fighting Is Magic] needed to be more than just fighting with ponies; it needed to be a competent fighting game that just happens to have ponies."

"To be honest, the pony aspect has been overtaken by the drive to make this a good fighting game," Wright said. "We have been overwhelmed by the validation from different areas of the fighting game community. It has been pretty amazing." Part of that validation came from an unlikely benefactor who helped thrust Fighting Is Magic into the cold, calculating eyes of the fighting game community at the Evolution Championship Series, the world's premier fighting game tournament.

"The pony aspect has been overtaken by the drive to make this a good fighting game. We have been overwhelmed by the validation from different areas of the fighting community."

Being invited to EVO came as a surprise to the team. Granted, Fighting Is Magic had popped up a few times in threads on the Shoryuken forums, only to get shot down because of its pony trappings. Then the trailer hit, and the team noticed a stark change in tone. People began taking Fighting Is Magic seriously and discussing it not as a joke but as an actual fighting game.

Eventually, the game's buzz drew the attention of Mr. Wizard, one of EVO's organizers. His interest in the project was extremely motivational and informed the team that they must be doing something right. "EVO is the fighting game tournament. Period. And if one of the dudes running EVO thinks our fighting game is legit, then there's nothing anyone can say at that point."

In fact, as Nappy recalled, "[Mr. Wizard] actually approached us." Before long, Nappy found himself giving a demo of the game over Skype. "At one point, I pulled off this really long Pinkie Pie combo, and he started giggling like a little girl. I don't think I can really explain the feeling I got from that moment--it was unreal. He was talking to me like [Fighting Is Magic] was a real game. He was completely serious about it, and he was enjoying himself."

In July of 2012--just over a year since the first trailer--Fighting Is Magic became an official part of the EVO 2012 indie games corner, alongside such games as Divekick and Super Comboman. This was a great opportunity for MANE6 to show off all their hard work, and while none of them were able to attend the show in person, they were able to monitor the community's response. The verdict was "pretty freaking positive" between the show floor demos and a monster live stream fabled to have lasted more than 10 hours. Slowly but surely, fighting fans were coming around to this implausible concept.

A few months later, in September, MANE6 had another opportunity to show their game to a much different crowd. Klisk Midori, friend of the team and founder of Canterlot Gardens--a dedicated My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic convention--invited MANE6 to host a tournament at his show. This time, Nappy, Ellinghaus, Wright, and Workman were able to attend, as well as the game's two musicians: RC88 and Whitetail. Together they brought along an updated version of the game. Some miscommunication led to a delayed start for the tournament, but once everything was straightened out, the response was once again position.

And unlike at EVO, the team now had the chance to meet with their fans. They hosted a panel, gave interviews, and even signed a few autographs--much to their chagrin. "It was very flattering," said Wright, "but I want our game to get the attention, not us." This is not to say they were ungrateful--far from it. But with every new blog post, trailer, and public showing, the team pushed the boundaries a little further and risked drawing the proverbial Eye of Sauron.

The threat of legal recourse from the show's producer, Hasbro Studios, against MANE6 has always been a very real--and terrifying--possibility. One letter, one complaint, and the team would have no choice but to cease development. Despite this, they remain optimistic. No donations or other forms of compensation have been accepted for this project--all expenses have come straight from the team itself. They have also been mindful of not violating the spirit of the show. There are no fatalities in this game or fountains of colorful pony blood. It is a fighting game, but everything is tempered in the whimsical nature of the My Little Pony universe.

"We know for a fact that the creator and producer of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic are looking forward to the game. Of course, that doesn't matter legally, so we're being very careful not to test the waters in any way," Wright said. "Hasbro has been very supportive of the creativity in the fan community, in all aspects. Plus, I think it helps that we're developing a game that would otherwise not exist at all."

While Fighting Is Magic's luck continues to hold, other fan projects have not been so fortunate. In December of last year, the fan-developed online role-playing game MLP: Online was forced to cease operations after legal complaints from Hasbro. For MANE6, it was a somber reminder of the razor's edge Fighting Is Magic treads. As Wright noted, "I can't imagine how gutted [those developers] must feel right now." Even so, MANE6 is determined not to get bogged down with worry. Their motto is: If it's going to happen, then it's going to happen. Until then it is business as usual.

Should Fighting Is Magic ever be put out to pasture, the team knows it will not have been for nothing. Nappy and the others are confident they can take what they have learned developing this game and apply it to their next project--one that is not based on an existing franchise. As Ellinghaus noted, "In the best-case scenario we would like to make our own game next--using our own [intellectual property]. We actually have ideas for our next game already, and if we get the right people, we will start it. Working on Fighting Is Magic has taught us that these ideas aren't impossible anymore."

Make no mistake: fighting ponies is, and will likely always be, an absurd concept. But the fact that Fighting Is Magic exists is a healthy sign for the fighting genre. It demonstrates how vast and resourceful the fighting game community has grown. If the FGC can already independently execute a game on this level of quality, imagine all the potential left to explore.

Smaller, fan-driven projects such as this help keep the genre feeling fresh. Developing modern video games is an expensive business, and the Namcos and Capcoms simply cannot afford to take all of the risk and try all of the experiments they would like. But the community can, and it is learning--much like how MANE6 has--that these wild ideas are not impossible anymore.

By all odds, Fighting Is Magic should not exist--but I am certainly glad it does.

Since the publication of this article, MANE6 has ceased development on Fighting is Magic after receiving a cease and desist letter from Hasbro. They are now working on a new fighting game featuring a new cast by My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic creative director and producer Lauren Faust. For more information about MANE6 be sure to check out their official site and look them up on Twitter via @ManeSix.

Part 2: Designing a Fighting Pony

Over the fighting genre's long and colorful history it has hosted plenty of outrageous warriors, from ancient gods to intergalactic aliens, and animals have been no exception. The Tekken series has its panda, Killer Instinct included a fighting velociraptor, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Tournament Fighters…well, you get the idea.

Somehow, amid such outrageous combatants, a fighting game with an all-pony roster has remained absent in the lineup--until now. However, the process of turning these cartoon ponies into war horses has presented some interesting challenges for their young designers. The road from initial idea to finished fighter is filled with unexpected perils, and surprising solutions.

Step One: "Wouldn't it be cool if..."

This is the all-important brainstorming step. The team gathers around a shared document or open canvas to decide how a friendly pony would throw down in a fight. Every "wouldn't it be cool if…" idea is shared between them, within reason. MANE6 strives to match the tone of the cartoon as closely as possible. To that end, certain aspects of the ponies--such as their appearance and attitude--are set in stone. You're not going to see a hyperaggressive Fluttershy or a Rainbow Dash that only fights with projectiles. These restrictions help guide each pony's fighting style.

The team also looks outward to the numerous other fighting games available for character references. Seeing how other developers have interpreted the common fighting game archetypes accelerates the design process and can inspire new ideas. Once a pony's general play style is established, the challenge then becomes making that style unique. Referencing another character is fine, but copying one entirely is out of the question. The development of Fighting Is Magic's distinct magic button has gone a long way toward making its roster feel different from any other.

Step Two: Sketch Everything

Once a road map is in place for a character, the next step is sketching out each of those ideas in detail. Hit boxes are assigned during this time as well, showing which areas of an attack can actually harm the other player. An attack's special properties, such as between its standard and EX version, are also discussed. For characters such as Apple Jack and Twilight Sparkle, these designs come quickly. However, others can take a little longer.

"With Pinkie Pie," recalled Ellinghaus, "we had no idea what we were going to do with her."

"She has so many random motions," Nappy added. "Everybody saw her do a cartwheel during an episode and thought, 'Oh, that's the perfect move!' Except, we then have to build a whole moveset around that. How does she jump? What's her battle stance? We had to dig pretty deep in the show to find these ideas."

Every so often during their research, MANE6 finds one of their own ideas mirrored elsewhere. "For example," said Nappy, "Pinkie Pie has this move where she fires a present out of a cannon, and she can teleport out of the present as an attack.

After we got this idea in the game, Persona 4 Arena comes out and this Teddy dude has a move where he throws TVs--and then he jumps out of the TV--and I fell out of my seat! We thought we were so unique, but it is cool that we're thinking along the same lines of these top developers, even slightly."

Step Three: Individual Review

Before committing a character to production, the detailed sketches are sent out for another round of inspection. The designers check for redundant attacks and ensure that everything remains consistent with the pony's style. Ideally, each pony would need to go through this process only once, but as experience has shown, this is rarely the case. One of the most troublesome has been Rarity, a long-range fighter whose arsenal has seen more revisions than any other.

"[Rarity] was always seen as a zoning character," said Ellinghaus, "but our execution and direction for her needed heavy revision. In the beginning, nothing really fit together."

"She was more of a MOBA character than a fighting game character," Nappy added. "She had all these setups and situational attacks with her gems that required precise timing at the right angle. In the end, our testers only used her most straightforward attacks; the others just weren't worth all the trouble." In the end, after an eight-hour debate, it was decided that less was more in Rarity's case. Certain moves were nixed completely, while others were simplified. The team is confident these changes help focus her play style while maintaining some technical complexity.

Step Four: Flash Animation

This step is where the rubber hits the road. All moves have received the MANE6 seal of approval and are drawn up one by one in Flash. Early on in this process, the team discovered that animating attacks that felt powerful with a pony's physiology was going to be tricky. As Wright explained, since ponies lack the T-shaped torso and shoulders of a human, they cannot attack with the sweeps and rotations that make punches look painful. Plus, since a pony's legs and torso are the same color, certain attacks just looked like a mess of color.

"Consider Ryu: His body is all white, his center is highlighted by a black belt, his hands are red, and his feet are skin colored. Because of [these details], you always know exactly where his attacks are coming from. With our characters, for example, there's a yellow blob with these sort of spaghetti noodle lines coming out of it, and the end of that line is supposed to have power somehow. I don't think we have succeeded 100 percent, but we have tried to make up for it using hit sparks and opponent reactions."

Step Five: From Flash to Fighter Maker

This final step is the long, difficult road each character must travel to make it into the game. It is an extremely complex, often heartbreaking journey as the vector-based, soft-edged images from Flash are made ready for the pixel-based, hard-edged world of 2D Fighter Maker 2002. As one of the team's animators, Wright has penned an extensive entry on MANE6's official site detailing how this is done. It is important to note that there is "some crying involved."

Once a character makes it into the game, the team can see if their attack designs--specifically the hit box layouts--work well in real combat. Naturally, the first few attempts didn't feel quite right and required extensive reshuffling. As Nappy explained, "When we drew up the hit boxes for these characters, they were basically square heads and huge rectangle bodies. When we put it in the engine, we found the game became very cross-up heavy. I don't think there has ever been a fighting game where the standard character design was this wide. That has been a fun challenge to play with."

Over the many months since this project began, the team at MANE6 has run through these steps more times than they care to admit. Mistakes have been made, moves scrapped, and characters completely reworked. But with every new challenge the team learns a little more about development, and becomes a little more proficient at their craft. Today, the end is almost in sight. "We're not on the homestretch yet," said Wright, "but we can see it. There are still hundreds of things we want to add, we just have to get them all in the game. We're almost there."

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Discussion

1093 comments
Eraldus
Eraldus

Ugh... this tumor is now reaching games too???


Ewwwwww...

blazah99
blazah99

As of Friday 2/8/2013 the dev team Mane6, the guys behind Fighting is Magic, received a C&D(Cease and Desist) letter from Hasbro for copyright infringement. The team has complied with their request and removed all content from there site, leaving a lot of fans heartbroken.

However in the aftermath, still unfolding at the time of this writing, Lauren Faust, the person responsible for the shows revival, as offered to help Mane6 create new original characters for the game. No response as of yet has been given as to whether or not Mane6 will except the offer or not, seeing that as a result of this issue has caused one of the Mane6 to perminatly leave the project.

As the situtation spreads across the internet sites like IGN, Screwattack, Forbes have briefly reported on the topic in addition the fan made sites like EquestriaDaily, DerpyHoovesNews, and TheRoundStable.

Sources:

http://www.mane6.com/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1cLC1ljzzE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZa7wgLr65o http://www.screwattack.com/shows/originals/hard-news/hard-news-021113-legacy-kain-resurrection-fighting-magic-put-down-and-acti http://www.eventhubs.com/news/2013/feb/09/my-little-pony-fighting-magic-receives-cease-and-desist-hasbro/ http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2013/02/11/youtube-vatican-timberlake-apple-my-little-pony/2/ http://www.equestriadaily.com/2013/02/regarding-fighting-is-magic-takedown.html http://www.derpyhoovesnews.com/fighting-is-magic-devteam-served-with-cease-and-desist-notice/ http://www.roundstable.com/2013/02/08/mane6-fighting-is-magic-dev-team-served-cease-and-desist/

Caironomad
Caironomad

It's a sad to say for what was sure to be a great indie fighter, but on Friday the team behind Fighting is Magic announced that they received a cease and desist order from Hasbro's lawyers. In compliance they have indefinitely shut down work on the game, but even if they bring it back the damage has already been done as two of their staff have announced their "final and irrevocable" resignations from the team. Here's the blog post explaining the sad state of the whole affair: http://www.mane6.com/2013/02/not-all-wonder-is-endless.html

alphabetsoup314
alphabetsoup314

It starts off as a silly idea. Harmless, right? Then someone (somepony) takes that silly idea a little bit further. Others laugh at them, mock them, or point out that it is a stupid plan. And sometimes they are right, and that silly idea turns out to be nothing more than a wild goose chase. But sometimes, that silly idea grabs its creator by the wrist and leads them to dreams beyond imagination. And that is why I love indie efforts.

Take Alien Hominid  for example. It started off as a silly little flash game on a site called Newgrounds created by two guys named Tom and Dan. Then Tom and Dan decided create their own company and to take the game to Xbox. They threw their all at it. People thought they were crazy - there was no guarantee that the game, or the company, would even take hold. 

Fast forward several years later. They are now the faces behind the Behemoth success that is Castle Crashers (pun intended). 

Or, if you would still like to scoff at the idea that this silly idea can go anywhere, perhaps I should tell you the story of two guys named Wilber and Orville. They were just bicycle makers, but they had bigger dreams. They dreamt of human flight. 

"But that's preposterous!" people said, "humans are not designed to fly. They'll just come crashing down like Icarus."

Over a century later, we take for granted the ability to hop in a machine and soar above the skies, and it's all thanks to them.

The people behind Fighting is Magic may only be working on a fan project now. An unfunded, not-for-profit game, set in a fandom that mostly just gets mocked and laughed at, and at the risk of a cease and desist order that could kill the project entirely. And for what? Fame? The "reward" of making their dreams come true? When you look at it, there isn't a whole lot to gain - as much I like ponies, I admit that the show may eventually die, and be remembered as nothing more than a cartoon for girls, and the fandom will die and be forgotten, and the game too. Yes, it seems like a silly idea when you look at how little they have to gain. 

But maybe some of them will keep holding onto their silly ideas and become the next behemoths in the gaming industry.

Epsilon47
Epsilon47

As a brony this is really exciting for obvious reasons.

But as a gamer, it's even more exciting. 

This isn't just some indie flash game that's gone through a few years of iterations and become marketable on an iPhone. This is a legitimate game crafted with little funding, no publisher support, and little and awareness in a niche genre which has the real possibility of becoming something special. I think that games like this, Bastion, Fez, and the huge number of other "indie"/"downloadable" games are taking over the gaming market for experimentation where the AAA titles dare not tread. Further more, they are becoming just as popular as some of the AAA's too. I think high quality grassroots projects like this are going to really take over a large part of the industry as we know it. I honestly feel that some of these major game developers are going to see there investors say, "Maybe instead of us giving you $1 million to develop this game to make $1 million in sales... Can you make a game for $100,000, and still hit $1 million in sales?"


I really think the industry is changing from the bottom up right now.

marco23p
marco23p

I just made this account so I could respond to this

First off, i love the article, it gives a really great outlook for the game, and shows how talented this community can be.

If you are reading this article as a brony hater, and are planning to write another stupid comment..just think for a moment before you do. The people behind this game put a lot of time and effort, they are not being lazy on this, and it shows a lot of talent and passion

I find it quite perplexing when people spend all there time finding brony related stuff just to tell them that they should get a life, perhaps you should take your own advice, no?

People are saying that this is the downfall of gamespot, that this is a mockery of gaming, god forbid that people get interested in something that is outside of the status quo, aren't people encouraged to be different  be unique? Or should we all be zombies who just sit around playing call of duty and pretending to be manly?  Who ever said that ponies where for girls? Just because it's marketed for little girls? Okay, then please find me some rule book of life that says, "Ponies are girly in every imaginable way". The whole idea of something being girly is man made. Not to mention  that people making this game sure as hell have enough skill to do so, and if they continue on this path, they could have a bright future, because being able to do this is quite a skill that will be valuable in this day in age.


Whilst I am not looking forward to this game too much (I dont play fighting games :/) I wish the devolpers the best of luck. And thank you to gamespot.

LOSTLEAD8R
LOSTLEAD8R

Really be awesome to see this at Evo. Would really make me want to go to Evo too.

Darklurkr23
Darklurkr23

Player's Choice for Evo 2013 you say?  XD   I haven't seen a build w/ all 6 characters since AWHILE back, but if any community can get this fighter into Evo via Donations, it's Bronies.

rasputin177
rasputin177

Fighting game aficiandos who are obsessed with My Little Pony must need a tissue after reading this.

ShadowofSonic
ShadowofSonic

This game looks like crap, I wish bronies would kick their own buckets. They are only 'fans' of the show because they want to stand out. Sad.

BLACKF0X
BLACKF0X

As a Brony, I am looking forward to this game it is coming along very nicely. The sheer determination of the community is inspiring.

itchyflop
itchyflop

f~ck me it ll be there care bears beat em up bonanza next !! rainbow power !!! ha quirky, different, fair play to the fan developers

I_Dunno_Gamer
I_Dunno_Gamer

hmm...the mechanics look interesting, the art work is pretty nice and the music sounds great. Who gives a flying feather if the characters are ponies, i'm interested in the game play.

GtWthTheProgram
GtWthTheProgram

What the hell happened to GameSpot?

 

Perhaps your focus groups have told you something that I don't know, but it blows my mind that the site is so interested in irrelevant nonsense and commentary.  You're a big budget site with a marquis name, report on big budget games with marquis titles more please.

Justforvisit
Justforvisit

Man we need an officla version like on Steam or sth. ._. I'd SO buy that!

Ezzekiel_Fox
Ezzekiel_Fox

@marco23p I see that unintended brohoof at the end. No worries, I gotcha covered!

(\

But yes, these guys are going to be millionaires three days after this game releases. The first day for it to hit public, the second day for a major gaming company to offer them a multi-million dollar contract, which they will refuse, and then the third day where they buy lottery tickets, watch the lottery numbers that night and find out they won the jackpot.

But on a serious note, I cannot believe it has been nearly two years since the games initial announcement. When they released the video of their game in the alpha alpha ALPHA stage, with AJ kicking AJ's flank, brains literally melted. Fast forward to EVO this year where Fighting is Magic is going to be part of the lineup (if you wanna place a bet against that, I hope you're ready to lose a lot of money) and It's amazing that a fan created game made by a bunch of noponies can become as popular as it will be.

BraeburnMLP
BraeburnMLP

@ShadowofSonic If you're trying to bring down the Brony Community's spirit, you're gonna have to try a lot harder.

bookwormpony
bookwormpony

 @ShadowofSonic "Bronies" are not the only fans of the show thank you ever much. There are the Pegasisters like me as well ^_^ 

MoonShadeOsu
MoonShadeOsu

 @ShadowofSonic oc! We are fans because we want to stand out! I also do sports just to stand out! I like listening to electronic music just because I want to stand out!

 

Hey I tell you what: I'd rather have a bunch of hobbies which I really like - even if some may not be accepted by society - instead of being a boring person with no interests whatsoever.

Raptornx01
Raptornx01

 @itchyflop Long as they use the second CB movie. Lionheart was a boss. Plus the first one was kinda fucked up (like most 80's family films.)

rasputin177
rasputin177

 @GtWthTheProgram

Your so full of it. The most ignorant comment I have seen this year. This is the type of article that makes a gamng site stand out. Why do I need 5 "different" write ups on Bioshock Infinite all with a different name but the same content? Its not like they are taking away from other games. Most days I find the same article on GS and IGN just with a different name. I wish there were more interesting and unique write ups like this one. Plus, I would never have heard about this if not for this article. Your comment makes me wish they still had an "unlike" button. What a silly and out of touch comment.

Raptornx01
Raptornx01

@GtWthTheProgram

Every major gaming site reports on indie games and low key titles. Frankly, those kinds of games NEED attention. More then any triple A title, which will be spammed everywhere and very hard to avoid.

 

It's games like these, or Journey, or Flow, or braid, or Limbo, that set the foundation for AAA games to be made. mainly cause this is where most of the people making those big games got their start. and the fact that people can create compelling and fun games without the AAA budget makes them even more special.

Raptornx01
Raptornx01

 @percuvius2 well, ofcourse. I mean, you'd have to be a very special person indeed to buy a free game.

TheHappyDrunk
TheHappyDrunk

 @Justforvisit That would likely land the devs in legal trouble. There's a reason the game is being released (legally) for free as a non-profit project.

BraeburnMLP
BraeburnMLP

@rasputin177  Your comment deserves more likes. You're one of the few people here who isn't posting hateful nonsense. 

DutchyI
DutchyI

@abosous i just made this account to say that i find this argument really fucking hilarious. i used to be a brony and i know serverel anime fags. my experience? 8/10 bronies are socially awkward and 8/10 anime fags are fat and ugly.


thats why i left the community

abosous
abosous

@iDefinition 

I will definitely not humor a person simple-minded enough not to see where he is being biased, that is just too much m8.

I assumed you were an anime otaku hentai lover because of your profile pic and your xbox tag, so you definitely did not assume on the same basis that I did.

Oh sure it is your business, it is also the bronies' business but you don't seem to respect that, another hypocritical statement on your end, so what was the point of pointing that out? Similarly to how you can't judge otakus based on conventions and shit, you can't really judge the bronies on that either can you? common sense. Lol, the nonsensical accusations you claim I am making flew way over your head it seems, people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, just understand that. 

Well known and accepted (which is what you were talking about, how acceptable they are) are two very different things. Rape is very well known, does that make it more accepted?

Unlike you, I didn't compare fandoms to show which one is better (which is the childish act i was protesting in the first place), I did it to show you that as much as you'd like to believe that bronies are the "weird and wrong"  part of the internet, you aren't beyond reach of that claim as well. I was trying to show you how stupid it is to claim the bronies to be abnormal when you yourself are part of something that is far from normality as far as society is concerned.

and finally, that's not true at all, hentai has only one role, which is sexual, thus most people consider otakus as sexual deviants and pedophiles because of its strong correlation. While in reality, bronies are not widely known as cloppers, that is just slander from the internet and a fox news show (in fact, not that many people are aware of it). I recall a friend of mine telling me that the whole clopper thing is out of proportion, a poll on some brony website registered 47%% cloppers vs 53%% non-cloppers. People ironically care more about what you fap to than your actual values, and since sexual deviation is more correlated with otakus, it is less accepted, liking a cartoon on the other hand, even one for little girls just makes you seem eccentric and immature. Your assumptions are completely off.



iDefinition
iDefinition

@abosous

I refer you to my original post. Other than silly ad hominem attacks, you have yet to point out what exactly is biased. (particularly in the first video. The second one is , but does have some truth in it.)

For your first question: I assumed you were a brony by the same basis as you assumed I was an "anime otaku hentai lover".

For your second paragraph, doing whatever I want in my free time is not weird, because it ends there. I would never consider going to any anime related convention. The one making a large post full of nonsense (after a post full of ad hominems) containing numerable accusations is clearly the one more interested in your so called "flame fest".


For the third, partially correct, specifically about the online communities part. However if you go past the internet, then we have a question of how well-known each are. I assume you're talking about America and unfortunately, I can't answer that.

For your last one, your arrogance is showing, again.  The one who originally compared fandoms was you. Consider taking your own advice. And lastly, considering all that bronies do, and a friendly reminder it's all based on a child cartoon, I'd say (assuming both are equally well known) that they're the ones who are much closer to pedophilia than otakus.

KilianAmberShaw
KilianAmberShaw

@abosous Made this account right now, so I could say Bravo. for once some one with a bit of intellect said something I could agree with.

abosous
abosous

@iDefinition

Thats cute, now here's a question smart guy, what made you think I am a brony? :) In fact, I'm originally a lurker and I just created an account to make that response because of how sickened I was by an anime otaku hentai lover to imply that bronies are weird.

Here is a news flash for you smart guy, as far as "regular" society goes, you and bronies are just a different shade of red. You try to stick to your online communities because over here, you are considered as normal as can be. But in reality, you are just calling the bronies an uglier shade of red to make you feel better about yours, it is really quite pathetic. From what I've seen, most bronies and otakus can at least acknowledge that they are doing something weird (and thats ok as far as i am concerned, so do i with other stuff), but its people like you that turn this into a flame fest to gain face with yourself, again, pathetic.

By the way, from what I've seen, it is easier to admit to being a brony, people might consider you slightly immature or just too nostalgic to cartoons but it doesn't really hurt face with people. You're more likely to being considered a sick fuck irl when admitting to all that hentai (most people associate loli with it). So no, your shade of red is not actually more accepted than their shade, you are just clinging too much to the context of on-line communities, and for obvious reasons -.-

"hurr durr, your fandom is worse than mine" <---- this here is what I'm talking about, you need to learn to grow up. I bet you consider anyone who calls otakus pedophiles to be mis-informed, shortsighted and close-minded. Well, big news, genius, guess what you sound like.

iDefinition
iDefinition

@abosous

Not really. I used that name because I think it's amusing. Regardless
of that, I'll retaliate by saying that the fandom of your child cartoon
is practically no different. In fact considering it is originally a
child cartoon, and I've sadly seen (thank you, Encyclopedia Dramatica.
"It's a whole universe out there" indeed.) things that are quite
comparable to most extreme hentais you might ever cross. Considering the
circumstances, and without taking into account your arrogance, your
fandom, or "genre", are arguably much worse.

2. I tend to agree.

3. I agree as well.

Celldrax
Celldrax

 @iDefinition  @Raptornx01

Shame that doesn't apply to subjective points of view. Too bad, you may have had something there...

 

Yes, I have nothing better to do.

abosous
abosous

 @iDefinition  Oh, you're being unbiased, thats pretty cool, i might as well try that. I see you are a hentai fan so:

This http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTbQwVjEwWg

Furthermore, this: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120119072246AAMXfmP

and furthermore, this: http://www.psu.com/forums/showthread.php/183399-Why-are-so-many-anime-fans-so-freakin-weird?s=d98b561c6d92b60364a97e0cedbca6ee

 

Facts are unbiased so you are a perverted pedophile and i believe you are cancer to society >.> facts are facts m8 :D

KilianAmberShaw
KilianAmberShaw

@rasputin177 @BraeburnMLP  Agreed with both of you. indie games need the love much more then this multimillion doller games throwing there weight around as if they never started in the same position.