Feature Article

The Elder Scrolls Online: Trapped Between Worlds

A tale of two Tamriels.

by

I love massively multiplayer role-playing games. I love Elder Scrolls games. And I love exploring huge fantasy worlds, seeking treasure and gawking at gorgeous vistas that feel at once foreign and familiar. You would suppose that The Elder Scrolls Online is my dream game, an online RPG in which I can join others in daring feats and seeing just how far we can bend the world to our wishes before it snaps back.

Up until a recent beta weekend, however, The Elder Scrolls Online hadn't enthused me. I'd seen the game in action, heard the developer explain its design approach, and played the game myself, and my impression rarely wavered: ESO looked and sounded dated, a product of old philosophies that the genre had outgrown, with clumsy animations and by-the-numbers questing. Over the weekend, I played a good dozen hours of the game, and my outlook improved. Do I still think The Elder Scrolls Online is beholden to outdated ideas? Yes. Am I still as apathetic to the game as I once had been? No.

What drew me in was the world. Yes, it's a world many of us already know, but The Elder Scrolls Online uses that familiarity to its advantage, easing back on the user interface and allowing Tamriel to fill the screen, rather than relying on labels and markers. By default, you don't see names and titles hovering over the heads of your fellow players, vendors aren't identified as such onscreen, and the hotbar containing your attack icons disappears when you're not engaged in combat. As you roam the wilds and stroll about the streets of the city of Daggerfall, the compass at the top of the screen and a brief quest description are your only onscreen guides. Clearly, Bethesda wants this world to surround you, to be the primary reason you visit. Had EverQuest not appropriated the slogan "You're in Our World Now," it might have been an apt descriptor for The Elder Scrolls Online.

This is where the game excels. The series's high-fantasy tone is front and center. Within towns and villages, banners fly and guards patrol the streets, looking for troublemakers. In the forests, the birch trees are so weathered, you feel you might reach out and tear the bark right from the trunks. When venturing into an eerie graveyard, a steady drone of eerie violin harmonics evokes the danger of undead lurkers; near the vast ocean, legato cellos hark back to the third game of the Elder Scrolls series, Morrowind, eliciting shivers. Ornate windows decorate stone walls, Dwemer (that is, dwarven) constructs spring to life, and orcs look and sound as genteel as can be given their savage reputations. Logging into the game was like going home again, and the minimal interface kept distractions to a minimum. Tamriel is truly a place I want to be.

Welcome back to Daggerfall.
It takes a village to save a village.

As I played, however, it didn't take me long to see the downside of the game's focus on immersion, one that was exacerbated by the limited group of players inhabiting the same fields and dungeons. I was approaching ESO as I would approach any Elder Scrolls game: as an adventure of my own, unsullied by the presence of others. I occasionally noticed other players, but there was no reason to interact with them, and the game offered no encouragement to do so. The chat channels were all but silent--again, partially because I was not surrounded by a full contingent of players, but also (I suspect) because we were involved in our own personal agendas and had no need to interact. In turn, I had to ask myself: does this game need to be online at all?

It's too soon to know, even after a dozen hours. However, because I was a lone adventurer, it didn't take long for me to notice that next to, say, Skyrim, The Elder Scrolls Online wasn't stacking up. On one hand, perhaps it's unfair to presume that all of the series' elements should be brought to an online environment intact; on the other, the game is so intent on replicating the tone of the single-player games that it's almost impossible to not make comparisons. Fair or not, I noticed how the online environment dulls some of the shine. There's certainly plenty of exploration value, and the wide-open world beckons you to poke around, but that larger-than-life feel that comes from games like Oblivion and Morrowind is lacking.

The Elder Scrolls Online uses that familiarity to its advantage, easing back on the user interface and allowing Tamriel to fill the screen, rather than relying on labels and markers.

The Dwemer no longer reside in Tamriel, but their legacy is seen everywhere.

I recall, for instance, the first time I saw a giant silt strider in Morrowind. It towered over me, statuesque and obedient, prepared for me to leap on and hitch a ride to Seyda Neen. In Skyrim, I stood in awe at my initial glimpse of a mammoth lumbering off in the distance--and of course, the first ten minutes of that game were terrorized by a fearful dragon. In such instances, your imagination runs wild. What wonders will this world reveal? By contrast, The Elder Scrolls Online doesn't feel as mysterious.

That's not to disparage the game's production values, or to dismiss its atmosphere, which nails the proper vibe. But the usual Elder Scrolls invitation to go anywhere and do anything has been stifled a bit, instead sending you down a path more akin to other online RPGs. I do admire Bethesda's commitment to the universe, however. When you initiate dialogue with a non-player character, the camera adjusts to picture her on the left side of the screen, while the right side displays the dialogue and your potential choices. Aside from interactions that have not yet had audio inserted, every line is spoken aloud, and characters and tomes dump lore on you by the bucketload. "Never have the elemental spirits refused to answer our calls," says a character called Wyress Helene. "The grass, the trees, the very earth itself--they're dying." Oh yes, this is Elder Scrolls all right.

It did take me some time to realize, however that it was not an Elder Scrolls that would allow me to kill random townsfolks, steal their gold, and then fill their house with dragon bones. The game let me pilfer random goodies from sacks and trays, but I never got to pickpocket a vendor or slash his throat. The very online nature of the game prevents such delights. The problem with that is that I have yet to see how the online nature of the game benefits it, and I may not know until the game is launched and the servers fill with other fantasy buffs.

Do you suppose that orcs have high dentist bills?

Nevertheless, I enjoyed my questing time, due to the variety of the locales and circumstances. Bethesda has always done a great job of taking typical RPG duties--kill things, collect things, click on things--and giving them good context so that you don't feel like you are repeating the same activities over and over again. When a dog trotted up to me, I eagerly followed him so that he would lead me to my next objective. When villagers were burnt out of their homes, I went in search of stray victims in need of assistance. I was even transported to the past, where I discovered the origins of a racial conflict that had present day implications. And in many of those cases, I had choices on how to proceed. For example, I could interrogate prisoners so that they would divulge the information I required, or I could order the guards to slit their throats, and then compel the victims' spirits to betray their kinfolk.

Why can't the dead just stay that way?

Of course, a lot of these quests required that I slash up bandits and wolves with daggers, or fling fire at them. I like that The Elder Scrolls Online provides so much flexibility in how you develop your character. You choose a race and class at the outset, but from there, you equip weapons and armor as you see fit, and earn additional possibilities as you spend skill points and align with certain guilds.

Sadly, the act of beating creatures to a bloody pulp isn't nearly as compelling as you might hope. The battle system resides in an odd purgatory between the action-based combat of Tera or Neverwinter and the traditional hotkey combat of World of Warcraft or Everquest II. You use mouse buttons to perform standard attacks and blocks, and press keys to unleash more powerful abilities, but whether I was dual wielding axes or pointing a magical staff hovering imps, I was typically unimpressed. The combat in Skyrim and Oblivion is messy, but it still delivers some sense of impact and personal control. The Elder Scrolls Online's battles, on the other hand, lack any sense of connection between blade and flesh. The animations are the most culpable criminals in the combat crimes, which perhaps comes as no surprise given that animations are a continuing weakness in the series. Nonetheless, the stiff animations and seemingly random hitboxes make for milquetoast skirmishes.

But here's the thing: I had a lot of fun of playing The Elder Scrolls Online during its most recent test weekend. The fantasy ambience, the beautiful world, and the varied quests kept me absorbed, even when I was so keenly aware of the game's shortcomings. I'm just not sure how long the enjoyment can last. The game seems stuck between two identities: the massively multiplayer journey, and the liberated Elder Scrolls adventure. And I'm not sure that The Elders Scrolls Online can reconcile the differences in a way that satisfies fans of either approach.

Discussion

409 comments
Grazen
Grazen

I played it over the weekend on my gaming rig and on the mini Mac as well. It worked fine on both but the game just couldn't keep me interested. For one, I'm a noon so I need a controller to play these things. Running around with the WASD's and trying to reach down to CTRL to crouch and SHIFT to sprint just takes me out of the game. I also don't really understand what all of these other people running around on my screen do for my game, as far as I could tell not much. What I really want is for somebody to put mod Skyrim with the Just Cause Multiplayer Mod and let us go crazy! Barring that, a true Elders Scrolls VI or Fallout 4 should do just fine.

timpark15
timpark15

regardless of what anyone thinks I cant wait ive already got my imperial edition pre ordered yeeeeeeeeeeyyyyyyyaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

devilzzz2014
devilzzz2014

No raids = no buy at this point for me.  I just got done filling out a survey and I made it clear that without raids it is way less tempting to buy and play.

ninboxstation
ninboxstation

this game might ruine the "TES" feeling, by "overdosing" us with it's world, gameplay, settings, ect. ect..., but not really meating up with the greatness of Skyrim (or back in the day Morrowind or Oblvion)...; .. besides it wasn't too long ago, we were still playing Skyrim + DLCs... ("overdose" risk even higher, if we go only ca. one year later into TESO......)


perhaps we should leave this one out....

xhrit
xhrit

"It did take me some time to realize, however that it was not an Elder Scrolls that would allow me to kill random townsfolks. The problem with that is that I have yet to see how the online nature of the game benefits it,"

You can't kill random townsfolks, no.

INSTEAD, YOU CAN KILL OTHER PLAYERS.

TESO is hands down the best game in the series.

weakan
weakan

wasný Elder scrolls "suppose" te be a counter argument againt giant mmo's, showing that a console game can be just as deep and absorbingly fun.....i just don't see a point why this game exist really, if it did really something else to change the mmo astetics and have same growth in the genre that would be nice v.v, in the meanwhile i will probably play some Skyrim dlc in the meantime:P.

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

I played the game this weekend....and I had a lot of fun.  Thats all I'm going to say (detail wise).


Everyone griping about this game are very annoying.   What is wrong with it.  Some say it is too much like a solo game.  My response to them is that no one is making you play solo.  Get a group together.  If you're playing solo, it is not the games fault.   When I played EQ2, I would play by myself most times, and group when I had group content.  Same way for Matrix Online, or even Galaxies.  The only game where I ever felt I got more out of having people constantly around me was EVE, if your caught alone in EVE, you might as well just self destruct.  


No one is stopping anyone from joining a guild.  Whiners gonna whine and haters gonna hate.  


To the poor smucks whining about the sub price....if you can't afford .50 cents a day then you have bigger things to worry about than the subscription price.  One of the things that really pissed me off while playing GW2 was when I would find all these black lion chests and I had no keys....but of course I could buy some keys with real money in order to see what worthless loot was inside...


Bethesda is a business, not a charity.   If $15 seems too much for you then don't play, just stop whining ad naseum about how poor you are.  


The game has really good graphics, and great audio.  I love the variety it has to offer.  The skills are very well done and so are the animations.  Seeing Morrowind, with its huge mushrooms, for the first time since........well...Morrowind, brought a sense of awe.


It feels like a TES game.  

peety001
peety001

Alright so I made an account just to comment on this article. Good stuff, by the way, it sort've hits the nail on the head with regard to potential foibles. 


Now I'm here to tell you why you shouldn't write this game off just yet.


Everyone talks about how this game doesn't have a community feel to it, that it's too single-player oriented right now. This is, in my opinion, an unfair charge to lay before the door of an incomplete game that hasn't yet even had a fraction of the players involved as the game is designed for. Whether the world encourages community interaction is something only time will tell, but for me the signs seem pretty good. It has a PVP-based endgame, for one thing.


The game brings first person combat to the MMORPG sector of the market. This is a huge one for me and a TON of other people simply because other MMORPG's seem distant and uninvolving by comparison. The first person view also immerses the players deeper in the world, which is, in my opinion, significant for an MMO. Furthering my point of the TES philosophy at work. "Be who you want to be" certainly seems involved here as any class can use any item or weapon for any purpose. This is vital for me because it encourages freedom for combat in a way that other MMOs just haven't bothered with for one reason or another (I'm talking pretty exclusively about WoW here.) Oh, by the way, combat is different from normal TES games, but it is really, really well done. I never used a bow, but the other areas seemed quite satisfying.


For someone like me, who has played MMOs before but never really got into them chiefly because of boring gameplay or bland worlds, ESO offers a perfect package. Also, remember this game had an outrageous budget, which means they really will be trying to output quality content, which I think has been the Achilles heel for some past games.


I advise fellow TES fans to think about ESO not as an Elder Scrolls game, per say, but as an adaptation of the Elder Scrolls world for the creation of a stand-alone MMO. This was a crucial repackaging for me and it helped me to see this game's potential without being let down by the obvious shortcomings that come with changing a game designed for limitless single-player interaction to a game in which thousands of players must interact.


As an MMO and only an MMO, ESO succeeds for me. I only hope that there will still be enough people out there of like mind with me, or else I'll have to play alone, lol.


(Also everyone below me bitching about download problems and bugs, it's f@&ing beta, stop being a baby, this was a stress-test, not a walk in the park.)

ggregd
ggregd

Well, this is disappointing.  Every MMO I've played since WoW has overemphasized the solo experience and has been lacking because of it.  Someone needs to gonad up and make an MMO that requires you to group.  I don't believe they would be limiting their playerbase if they did so - millions of people play League of Legends and other MOBA's and you can't play them alone... 

Sure there are negatives to forced grouping, it adds wait time, you can get idiots in your group, or just people who are having a bad day, but that's part of the experience.  Being in a bad group is a learning opportunity and it points up how great it is to be in a good group.  If you have to group, you soon learn that you need to avoid pick-up groups and develop in-game friendships with other players and/or join a guild and play along with people you know.  If it's easy to progress without grouping then there is no incentive to do so.  If everyone has to do it, it's really not that hard to group up unless you're antisocial or garner a reputation as a griefer, in which case you have many other gaming options.  

The best experiences I've had in any game, not just an MMO, were when I played the original Everquest with a regular group.  Developers and designers seem to have forgotten that the rewards of playing together were what made MMO's great.  I've never been able to recapture that experience and I'm sure I'm not the only one who would welcome an MMO that put the emphasis back on what "Multiplayer" means.

Patohua1
Patohua1

This game is a piece of shit, pure and simple. I found myself bored to tears within the first few hours and had to force myself to keep playing, but it never got any better. As someone who did a lot of bow hunting in Skyrim, I went for the bow as my primary and was extremely disappointed. There's absolutely no range on the bow, so you have to basically melee with it and it's slow as crap to fire, so there is no point in using it. The lore feels forced, unlike the previous TES games and what the frick happened to all of the items you could pick up before and stealing from NPCs? If I find myself in an armory, I should be able to take the armor -.- The world is bigger than Skyrim, but feels smaller since nothing feels particularly important or worth sticking around to explore. Overall the game feels pointless in every way possible. I know it's only the Beta, but come on! It feels like a shitty free to play game and isn't worth a dollar of my money, much less full retail PLUS monthly fees. It barely even feels like an MMO and they would have been better off turning it into a SP game you have the option to play online with friends. The graphics and pointless wandering were about on par with Morrowwind...yeah, it doesn't even live up to Oblivion, much less Skyrim.

vadagar1
vadagar1

watched angry joe and I have to say the game looks pretty good for an MMO


the things they can do to improve it:


1-unlock imperials for all players, find something else to give the CE people.

2-enhance combat animations and spells

3-add collision detection plz plz 

4- polish the game (add more quests and enemies, tactics, difficulty ..etc etc) 


but I have to say the armor desgins are BEAUTIFUL, not good, FUCKING beautiful 


also, lose the 15$ a month and put an item shop like DOTA2 for cosmetic items, u will make way more money and players wont feel forced to pay to win


like special armor and maybe guild halls ...etc


I pray to GOD you will take my humble advice because I really really want this game to work (cause I want ES 6 and FO4) if u lose the 15$ a month I will get this game not because i don't have money to spare but because I play DOTA2 and BF3 and they are both free to play and I already spend like 200$ on cosmetic stuff on those in less than a year....

cwilder06
cwilder06

Good article - I think the author hits the nail on the head insofar as it appears they are straddling a line between traditional MMO and ES game and people largely feel they haven't really nailed either. In part because the nature of each is fairly incongruent. For people that are Skyrim fans, inherently, they are not going to love some of the forced upon dynamics of an MMO. Conversely, for people that are WoW fans, they aren't going to love some of what makes ES what it is. Blending the two together is a herculean task - it's too early to tell how well they've done, what I will say is I'd caution all those judging it based on a beta where crashing, bugs, etc. are all to be expected and where in most cases people have only played the first ~10 levels of the game. There does seem to be an enormous amount of depth - lots of crafting systems, tons of quests (and much more dynamic than the average MMO) and a huge world to do it in. I think from a macro point of view, the two biggest issues in my mind highlighted in the article and what people write below are:


- Combat is not engaging: I don't know how this can be fixed at this stage in the games development. ES has never had great combat, but trying to mix the traditional ES combat and traditional MMO combat seems to have resulted in something that doesn't do either particularly well?

- A lack of incentive to interact with fellow players: I play an MMO to be part of a community. I worry if there really is little reason to work together that it just ends up being a sub standard ES game online. I hope not - they have promised lots of raids/dungeons/high end PvP. Assuming that comes to fruition one would think then that it's only the early game that is so independent and at latter points working together is encouraged much more.

VargasUniverse
VargasUniverse

This game has been a mistake since the start. And I have a few questions to ask: Why charging for a monthly fee when you have a lot of better games using a free-to-play method? Why the ES haven't already changed it's dull and messy combat? What's happening with those animations?

I guess will find out very soon.

Alucard1475
Alucard1475

I played it on the weekend for a few hours. The game feels dull and unfinished. I've been experiencing UI errors, extensive loading times and tons of buggy quests. Some of the environmental design elements feel dated and repetitive. The game's missing the most important factor - fun. I feel like Zenimax is trying to cash in on the Elder Scrolls name. I don't think I'll buy this game, yet alone keep paying for it.

Sprock26
Sprock26

I "played" the beta this weekend. Or should i say i tried to play ESO this weekend. Friday there were logon problems, saturday and sunday i kept getting crashes! It sucked, i know it beta but the servers were to bad! But the little i got to play felt like an average MMORPG and a outdated ES. But i look forward to seeing it on PS4. I loved Skyrim on PS3 and i feel like this game belongs to consoles. I know there will be alot of haters about this, but thats my opinion.

lsdbaby
lsdbaby

My experience of the game is that it is literally unplayable due to ridiculous lag and bugs. I play quite a few MMOs (LOTRO, SWTOR, GW2) and I've never experienced anything remotely like it. Interacting with NPCs can take a minute or so for an input to be registered or can just crash you out of the game. Worst Beta I've played by a LONG margin.


There's so much good will from this game and they've made some good design decisions. But as Kevin said:


"ESO, y u MMO?"

kukumav
kukumav

First time in years I deleted a game in like half an hour...Compared to this FF A Realm Reborn launch was AMAZING (and even that couldn't keep me paying).

Don't bother downloading at all.



Saladudo
Saladudo

Personaly tested the Beta on weekend. It's an average MMORPG and a bad Elder Scroll game.

Prostakma
Prostakma

I think TESO faith will depend on how big the game community will be. If some of my friends will be shifting to TESO i will gladly join them. I remember when WoW came out and it wasn't best MMO game at that time, although the community was fantastic, everyone played it at thats what made the game so damn good.

genjuroT
genjuroT

Anyone else feel like Elder Scrolls should have been a small co-op game first? 

Aeondeity
Aeondeity

If it fails, we'll see TES:VI within a few years.

If it succeeds, we won't see it for a long time.

xSagez
xSagez

I'm afraid this is going to be the fastest MMO to die I ever seen. What a waste of money. These developers have got to stop being so damn greedy with the monthly subs. No MMO can pull it off anymore.

This game could probably get far with a model similar to Guild Wars 2 and if they drop the console versions which, will be holding this game back in my opinion.

Skkyzz
Skkyzz

Been playing TESO most of the weekend, the game is fun, but is it fun enough to pay for a subscription ?

I found some dark anchors, even tho no1 had the courage to send it back to where it came from, it still looked badass.

Questing gets boring and exhausting  after awhile.

I rushed to lvl 10 to try the pvp. PvP is fun at sometimes, but if u get outnumbered, all u do is die, run for 5 minutes, die, run for 5 minutes etc, it gets soooo annoying.

Its a real shame how the game got so disapointing. Been the whole weekend looking for a good reason to pay for the game, even tho the game isnt that bad, couldnt find that expecific very good reason to pay per month for TESO. Maybe if they change it to pay 60€ once and play, i will gladly buy it.

All i wanted was a game to play while the next WoW exp doesnt come out, i guess ill have to spam kill Garrosh in the meanwhile.

alicerogers
alicerogers

@xhrit 'TESO is hands down the best game in the series.' Find it hard to understand how you can say that WHEN ITS NOT EVEN FINISHED YET!

mikecrews
mikecrews

@czerka_corp The game makes us play solo.  Try grouping with another player on the same quest as you are.  It doesn't work.  You cannot help another player with a instanced quest unless you are not also on the same quest.  If both of you have the same quest, the game puts each in their own instance.  It's ridiculous.  You can only get help on a quest instance from players who don't have the same quest active.  


The game prevents players cooperating.  It isn't the players fault.

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

@Patohua1  pointless wandering....you do know that you could bring up your map with the "M" button, yeah?  Then find your destination and mark it with "F", then just follow the marker on the compass UI.  If you had pointless wandering, it was probably your own fault.

mark1202
mark1202

@vadagar1  Since when is a subscription pay to win?  You get the entire game just like everyone else that's paying the sub.  Pay to win is reserved for the F2P games that have a shop that forces you to buy items you can't get in game for real money...and are needed to be successful.


I've never heard anyone call a subscription game pay to win.


Also, the success of ESO has no influence on whether or not Bethesda will make ES6 or FO4.  This game is not being developed by Bethesda...there are way too many people in this discussion that keep getting that wrong.

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

@vadagar1  if you want to play as an imperial, then don't be a cheap bastard, just buy the imperial edition.   Oh, but you are cheap....another complainer about the subscription.


You state that you pay over $200 a year for "cosmetic" stuff, but then want everyone to be able to play as an imperial because they don't want to spend $20 more dollars.   


Which is it?  Are you a cheap bastard who whines about a $15 monthly subscription and an extra $20 for the CE, or are you a guy that would easily spend $200 or more a year on cosmetic stuff?

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

@cwilder06  besides "raids/dungeons/high end PvP", what would you have them add to make people wrk together?

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

@VargasUniverse  Why would you stop playing your so called "better games" in order to come play this game which you already believe is inferior?


Which animations, specifically, are you referring to?

mark1202
mark1202

@Sprock26  I agree that there were some crashes and login issues.  The Beta weekends before this last one were much better.  Keep in mind though that they added a ton of new players and the first night was more of a stress test than anything.  There were queues over 1 hour throughout the weekend...that is a strong indication that they invited way more people to play this time around.  


The previous Beta sessions were much smoother.  I'm sure Zenimax Online will get it figured out.

BraollusBeBack
BraollusBeBack

@Saladudo  I agree, I got to play the beta for a while, and it was just about a mediocre MMO'rpg, and not much of an elder scrolls game. The only interesting thing in this game for me is to see/visit new and familiar areas of Elder Scrolls.

XIntoTheBlue
XIntoTheBlue

@Prostakma How many would stick with a game because of the community, though? For me personally, if the game is very lackluster, I could care less of the state of the community. I will still pack up and find a funner game to play. If I wanted to be around great folks, I'd go into the real world instead.

csward
csward

@Prostakma  Actually, WoW was arguably the best MMO at the time, at least I thought so and I got it at launch...

BraollusBeBack
BraollusBeBack

@genjuroT  I think people make up unrealistic fantasies, about games like Skyrim, Oblivion, Morrowind, being online games, or co-op, they fail to see that those games are designed around the player, every quest, every dynamic event is for that ONE player to experience, and because the world is tailored with ONE player in mind, it wouldn't be nearly as interesting playing it online, sure, it would be fun to mess around and all that, but the story and quests, wouldn't work at all. However, maybe some day in the future when we have much more advanced computers and bigger industry of gaming, that could be achieved, because now it's unrealistic to achieve the sense of a living world dynamic enough to feel a living world to a number of different players playing at the same time, without downscaling the complexity of the quests, dialogs and dynamic events.

Sprock26
Sprock26

@genjuroT  Yeah i can def relate to that. I would have loved a Skyrim game where i could quest with like 2-3 of my friends. I can do that in ESO but the co-op game would have been awsome!

XIntoTheBlue
XIntoTheBlue

@Aeondeity You do realize this MMO is being developed by Zenimax Online Studios and not by Bethesda Game Studios, don't you? This MMO does not effect future single-player installments at all.

nano7028
nano7028

@Aeondeity I think this is the last TES we will have. It will fail, they will apologize for it and then go on in to another franchise. Making TES a MMO is just suicide.

Glitterpig
Glitterpig

@xSagez  in my opinion, people with your kind of attitude hold back humanity.


Sprock26
Sprock26

@xSagez  I understand what your saying, but like i posted before i think this may survive because its also coming out on consoles. Iam not sure that there isnt a MMO out on consoles, but none comes to mind right now.

czerka_corp
czerka_corp

@alicerogers @xhrit  he can say that in the same way other idiots can say that eso sucks.  Do you find it hard to believe someone would like this game?

mikecrews
mikecrews

@czerka_corp @cwilder06Let players cooperate on quest instances.  If both players have the same quest, this isn't permitted.  After playing three beta weekends, I find it hard to understand why this game needs to be an MMO.  Cooperation is, in various ways in different parts of the game, either forbidden, or useless.

figomebriga
figomebriga

@mark1202 @Sprock26yea they invited like 5000% more than there are people that will actually pay for this crap before it goes F2p. Hint ingame shop is already there. 6 months tops...F2p!

XIntoTheBlue
XIntoTheBlue

@BraollusBeBack @genjuroT I think you're right, Braollus. Elder Scrolls has always been a single-player experience, yet, there has always been a segment of the community demanding some sort of multiplayer. It was probably loud enough to get Bethesda to turn their attention toward an MMO that I think won't be as successful as they hope. I played one of the beta weekends and I was not very impressed. The way they designed this world and throws you into it with a million other schmucks running about ruins my immersion. How is my character supposed to seem important to the world with everybody else running amok anyway? No thanks. Personally, I enjoy a game or franchise when it's multiplayer/single-player from the start and stays that way. The moment they begin changing stuff up, I start not to enjoy it anymore because it's like they're trying to put in too many features into a game/franchise and ends up simplifying features of a game just so the developer can cater to more people. If I want to play a good multiplayer, I'll pick up Battlefield. If I want a good single-player, I'll play a game like Skyrim.

pongley
pongley

@nano7028 @Aeondeity There's still a huge market for the single player games. They'll just segregate this MMO from it completely. There are still 37,000 people in-game on Steam right now. That's more than the new DayZ.

Revenant_K
Revenant_K

@everson_rm @AeondeityDon't you worry, with ugly character model, clumsy animation, boring quests and unable to mod, for this game to success would take a miracle.

mark1202
mark1202

@figomebriga @mark1202 @Sprock26 There is not an in-game shop.  Zenimax Online has said they would have a shop to purchase vanity items and services like name changes and such...That's a big difference from having an in-game shop that's in your face all the time like they have in F2P games. 

It's possible it will go F2P like other MMO's have done in the past, it's a business model that has worked well for a few good MMO's that couldn't maintain their numbers with a sub. 

You obviously do not like this game and have no intention of playing...why spend any effort to comment on a game you have no interest in other than to troll?  You think it's crap and that nobody will be playing it...fine.  You aren't going to change the minds of people that will be playing any more than those that do not like it and won't be playing.