Spot On: 15 years of Warcraft

Blizzard game design chief Rob Pardo and lead designer Jeff Kaplan discuss acclaimed fantasy franchise's long history, from orcs and humans to the World of Warcraft phenomenon.

by

9.3, 9.2, 9.3, 9.2, 9.5, 9.2, 9.0.

The Alliance and the Horde first clashed in Warcraft: Orcs and Humans.

With review scores like that, there's no question Blizzard Entertainment has a track record of releasing some of the best-reviewed games the industry has to offer. Easily the biggest franchise in Blizzard's stable, though, is its real-time-strategy massively multiplayer online role-playing series Warcraft, which celebrates its 15-year anniversary this month.

The franchise reached global-phenomenon status on the back of World of Warcraft. The fantasy-themed game has defined--not to mention dominated--the MMORPG landscape since its launch five years ago this week. Now on its second expansion, WOW's global subscriber base stands at 11.5 million users as of Blizzard's last accounting, although it has run into trouble in one of its largest markets, being at the center of a cross-agency dispute inside the Chinese government.

The industry-tracking NPD Group pegs the MMORPG series' lifetime US retail sales at 8.59 million through July 2009. Indeed, all three games consistently rank in the top 10 of the NPD Group's monthly PC charts, with the tracking firm putting Wrath of the Lich King as the second best-selling desktop game for the first half of 2009. (Blizzard declined to offer total combined unit sales for WOW, Burning Crusade, and Wrath of the Lich King.)

Further, Wrath of the Lich King currently holds the record for the fastest-selling PC game in history. Following its November 2008 launch, the game sold 2.8 million units worldwide within its first 24 hours on the market. Of course, Blizzard bested its own record with Lich King's opening performance, as the prior title holder was The Burning Crusade, which sold 2.4 million units on day one in January 2007.

Beyond initial sales, WOW requires a membership fee of at most $15 a month. Blizzard also pulls in supplemental income from a host of game-related services, ranging from character name changes to the recently introduced in-game pets. All said, WOW drives the Irvine studio's contribution to parent company Activision Blizzard's top line beyond $100 million a month, according to the publisher's recent financial reports.

Rob Pardo

Inauspicious beginnings
Rob Pardo, Blizzard's vice president of game design, didn't necessarily see the franchise blowing up the way it has upon the release of that first installment.

"I was working at Interplay Productions when it came out," Pardo told GameSpot. "Interplay was publishing the first Warcraft: Orcs and Humans for international back then. So I had the opportunity to play it, and it was pretty exciting, because I had already played Dune II so I think it was really cool to see a fantasy version of that. I definitely didn't imagine back then that Warcraft as a franchise would get as big as it would get."

Released in November 1994, the original Warcraft: Orcs and Humans was criticized for being uneven, with the endgame dominated by the orc warlock unit and its ability to summon the disproportionately powerful daemon. And while obliterating pathetic little human towns always has its advantages, the franchise didn't hit its stride until the following year, with the release of Warcraft II: Tides of Darkness.

"It was really Warcraft II that I thought really blew things open, because of [online multiplayer networking service Kali]," Pardo continued. "Ironically enough, too, it came out within the same month as Command & Conquer, so we had this huge new genre explode at the same time between C&C and Warcraft II. I definitely saw a lot of potential in the future of the RTS genre, and certainly Warcraft was a part of that."

Named one of GameSpot's Greatest Games of All Time, Warcraft II brought with it a finely tuned single-player campaign, replete with memorable cinematics and a host of quotable characters ("Zug zug," "Ready to serve," "I can see my house from here!" and so on). Defined primarily by the third-party application Kali, Warcraft II also featured a strong multiplayer component, where gamers could compete on their own maps as well as refine their strategies in myriad ways.

World of Warcraft's merry band of adventurers numbers in excess of 11.5 million.

The World goes to Warcraft
Warcraft II spawned an expansion, Beyond the Dark Portal, in 1996, but it wasn't until 2002 that Blizzard issued its much-anticipated follow-up, Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos. Named GameSpot's PC Game of the Year in 2002, Warcraft III was the first installment in the franchise helmed by Pardo, who cut his teeth at Blizzard on the developer's acclaimed sci-fi RTS franchise Starcraft. Pardo noted that the franchise's pivotal step into the MMORPG realm came during Warcraft III development.

"After we finished Starcraft, we split into two development teams. One of the teams went off to make what would became Warcraft III, and the other team went to go make a game that survived a year, a year and a half before we decided it just wasn't going to turn into something that we thought would be Blizzard quality. And it was then that we started about what we wanted to do instead, and that's when the idea of World of Warcraft emerged."

"During Starcraft development, there was a whole host of us playing that were playing Ultima Online. There was a bunch of us that saw that being a fun genre. It was definitely during Warcraft III development that a lot of us started playing EverQuest. It was during that EverQuest era that we realized Ultima Online wasn't a fluke and it was going to turn into a full-fledged genre. And we really saw what was amazing about that genre and felt like we had an opportunity to do our own spin on it."

Pardo said that one moment that stood out to him was realizing that each of the 30-odd avatars standing around at a crafting forge in Ultima Online were controlled by an actual person. These sentiments were affirmed when EverQuest came along and added a deeper connection between players, Pardo said. The game designer should know, considering he led one of the preeminent guilds in EverQuest--Legacy of Steel--during the early 2000s.

"The unfortunate thing about some of the games of that era is that you had to be a pretty hardcore player to get to that level of fun," Pardo continued. "But that fun was so deep and so satisfying that we really felt like, hey, if we can just broaden this out to a wider group of players, there really might be something magic here."

Jeff Kaplan

Blizzard lead designer Jeff Kaplan assumed control of Pardo's guild after the Blizzard executive retired from EverQuest to focus his efforts wrapping up development on Warcraft III. In 2002, he was brought on to aid in development of the original WOW, and he said that it was no easy task adapting the franchise from its RTS roots to a more RPG setting.

"It required a huge shift," Kaplan said. "You do a lot of things in an RTS for very different reasons than you would do things in an MMO. As it relates to story, if you look at the ending of the original Warcraft III, you've got the humans, orcs, and night elves all united to overcome Archimonde at the World Tree. That didn't work for the structure of the MMO at all. We knew that we wanted to have Horde and Alliance pitted against each other. We had to re-create the rift that went all the way to the original orcs and humans."

"It's also hard to deal with the psychology of the dev team," he continued. "We would often feel obliged to do things exactly how they were done in the RTS, which isn't always right for the gameplay of an MMO. An example is, we wanted to give an ability called Death Coil to warlocks, because we thought it was really fitting. In Warcraft III, Death Coil was a Death Knight-only ability, and not only did it do damage, but it healed. People had a rough time coming to terms with the fact that it was OK to make changes and do what was right for the gameplay of WOW, even if that somehow contradicted what people saw in Warcraft III."

However, having the RTS as a backdrop did more than create challenges, as explained by Pardo. "We were really aided by the fact that we had so much history in the Warcraft franchise," he said. "So we had all these storylines and worlds, and in a lot of ways, at least early on when we started developing the maps and the zones, there was so much to already start from."

"[Vice president of creative development] Chris Metzen had already done a lot of the lore for Warcraft III and before, so we had this big head start on talking about all the different areas, Stormwind or Lordaeron," Pardo continued. "And you can see it to some extent in the game. If you look at the Eastern Kingdoms, in a lot of ways it is much more developed from just a lore and backstory standpoint than Kalimdor, and that's because Eastern Kingdoms really had three games plus expansion sets to really build it out, and Kalimdor was something new and fresh."

Cataclysm wasn't initially part of Blizzard's expansion slate.

Of course, the scope of an MMORPG is more substantial than that of an RTS. That difference of scale was reflected in Blizzard's initial plans for what it wanted to include with the original WOW when it shipped in November 2004. In fact, according to Kaplan, Blizzard initially intended to include the areas from The Burning Crusade, Wrath of the Lich King, and much of Cataclysm with the original launch.

"We planned it out extremely far in advance," he said. "To put it into perspective, Outland and Northrend and a lot of the ideas in Cataclysm were all part of the original shipping plan of the game. Every so often we'll have those moments from a project management and planning standpoint where we'll really go, well, what are we actually getting in and where should we actually be at? But part of what gets us there is scoping the project out for years and years to come and always having an idea of where we want to go, and that's what lets us steer the ship and eventually get there."

Outland and Northrend eventually arrived as part of The Burning Crusade and Wrath of the Lich King, and Cataclysm is expected to arrive sometime next year. Oddly enough, Cataclysm itself wasn't on Blizzard's list when it first began thinking about expansions.

"When we finished the original game, we began work on expansions," Kaplan said. "We didn't just think of one expansion that we were going to work on. We said, 'What are a lot of expansions we want to make for this game?' Because we want to have this big list that we can then narrow down and prioritize. Outland and Northrend were givens on that list. Cataclysm was an interesting departure from that, because it wasn't part of the original expansion plan that we had. It was something that evolved out of a lot of cool ideas forging together at once."

According to Pardo, Blizzard's initial expansion list also reflected a different release order than what gamers actually got. "As a matter of fact, when we launched WOW, we initially thought we were going to Lich King first," he said, noting that Outland and Northrend were givens on the expansion list.

This unpredictability, coupled with Blizzard's ability to be flexible with its direction, is also what led to the development of Cataclysm as a full expansion, he said. "When we shipped WOW, the whole idea of Cataclysm wasn't there at all. We certainly had the idea to do Deathwing, but the whole idea of Cataclysm came out of trying to determine what we thought was the right thing for the game next. We didn't foresee five years ago breaking the world up was it."

WOW will continue "for as long as the Internet is up."

According to Kaplan, Warcraft's reaching timeline and Blizzard's boundless creativity equate to no foreseeable end to WOW. "I honestly believe that there are enough compelling ideas to keep WOW going for as long as the Internet is up," he said. "I mean, the Warcraft universe spans well over 10,000 years. You can literally sit [Chris Metzen] down at any point, and say, 'Hey Chris, what should we do next?' And then an hour later you can get your next question in. The future of WOW is only limited by time and resources."

Of course, keeping WOW around forever means that Blizzard will soon have two separate MMORPGs in its portfolio. In May, Blizzard confirmed that the new MMORPG would be part of a "brand-new franchise," one different enough from WOW that the two wouldn't compete. Both Pardo and Kaplan believe that the company has learned plenty of lessons from WOW, ones that bode well for the new MMORPG.

"Probably the biggest [lesson] I'd say is all the different systems in WOW that do not very easily let you play with the people you want to play with," said Pardo. "They are all things that have very good gameplay reasons why they exist, but they really prevent people from playing with who they want, when they want. And that's something we're thinking very deeply about all the time with new MMOs. And not to say we're going to solve them all across the board, but we're definitely thinking about them a lot."

"There's a lot of people working on the new game who have also worked on World of Warcraft," Kaplan added. "So there's a lot of talented individuals from a technology standpoint, from a process standpoint, how to build a game like this, how to position ourselves for a stable launch after going through the experience of the original WOW launch. And then there's also a lot of things that are hard to narrow in on, more in this cloud of general design philosophy, of understanding what players want and the different player types."

Warcraft for the next 10 millennia
With the Warcraft franchise now firmly grounded in the MMORPG scene, some longtime fans of the series are wondering whether it will ever return to its RTS roots. According to Pardo, Blizzard does not consider itself locked into the MMORPG genre with Warcraft.

"We have a very different view with our franchises," Pardo said. "With Warcraft, we started trying to deviate out of that, back in the Warcraft Adventures days. I think it was around that time period that we started seeing these as intellectual properties. They are worlds, they are franchises, they are not specific to a game or even a game genre for that matter. If we had unlimited Blizzard teams to draw upon, I think [Warcraft, Starcraft, and Diablo] could support all kinds of different game genres within them."

Pardo also believes that, just as the company will soon have multiple MMORPGs, it wouldn't present a problem to have real-time strategy efforts like Starcraft II and Warcraft IV--were it to be made--in the company's portfolio. The secret lies in differentiating the games enough from one another to create different play experiences.

"When we started developing Warcraft III, we were very strategically deviating from what we had done before," he said. "We wanted to try to come up with an RTS game that had a little bit more of an RPG feel to it, a game that relied more on micromanagement than macromanagement, really had more of a focus on smaller numbers of units. These were all very specific decisions that we made, and even when we were making them, we knew that when we came back to the Starcraft franchise, we were going to go back more to the old style of faster-paced games."

"And that's not because we thought Warcraft III was wrong," he continued. "It was because we were deviating the RTS genre into almost subgenres, at least within Blizzard. If we ever did go back and decide to do, let's say, a Warcraft IV, I would guess we'd probably go back toward the Warcraft III model, or more toward the hero model, rather than continue to follow down the Starcraft II way."

Pardo also noted that the things preventing Warcraft IV from being made are the time, resources, and passion to execute. "Let's say when the Starcraft II team finishes up, they decide that they wanted to make [canceled action spin-off] Starcraft: Ghost. We'd probably be supportive of that," he said. "If they decide they want to make Warcraft IV, we'd be supportive of that. Something new? That would be fine, too."

The Lich King has been named as one possible star of the forthcoming Warcraft film.

Beyond that, Pardo noted that Warcraft isn't even bound by the RTS and MMORPG genres, saying that they consider new ways to experience the franchise "all the time." He also said that Blizzard would be open to giving players the opportunity to go more hands-on with any of the various events along Warcraft's reaching 10,000 year timeline.

"If we ever made a World of Warcraft II, Warcraft IV, or, I don't know, Warcraft Legends, I can see us doing all kinds of interesting things," he said. "Again, if the right idea was out there, I could totally see us jumping around the timeline if we thought that was right. Let's just say we decided to make an, I don't know, Dragon Age/Mass Effect-style RPG, but we wanted to tell the story back around the time of Medivh. We certainly could do that if there was passion around that and it was exciting. Whether or not I foresee that, it kind of falls back in that bucket of "really cool idea." We'd need a team that was really passionate about doing it."

For Pardo personally, the events surrounding the opening of the Dark Portal are a particularly compelling event in the Warcraft continuum. "If you think of that seminal moment around the Warcraft franchise, it's really that opening of the Dark Portal, right?" he said. "That's the event that probably defines our universe more than other fantasy universe, that moment where the two worlds collided, because that's really what started making Warcraft, Warcraft. So I think that's a really interesting time period. A lot of the exploration of the prehistory of the night elves and the time period of Illidan and Tyrande and Malfurion. I think that's a really interesting time period, but there are a lot of interesting ones."

Regardless of where the Warcraft franchise goes, the future remains promising. In July, Blizzard announced that it would be extending the Warcraft franchise to the silver screen, signing on Spider-Man helmer Sam Raimi to direct and Saving Private Ryan scribe Robert Rodat to write the screenplay. While details on the film have yet to emerge, rumors indicate that the plot may adhere closely to WOW's Wrath of the Lich King expansion, chronicling the life and times of Arthas Menethil, better known as one half of the demonic Lich King.

And, of course, the lights will remain on for some time to come in World of Warcraft.

"It would be kind of the worst thing ever if we weren't working on it five years from now, because it would mean that we had done something horribly wrong or we didn't achieve our goals," Kaplan said. "I'm hopeful that we'll be having this conversation another five years or 10 years from now."

Discussion

266 comments
SgtSilock
SgtSilock

Regarding the film, i hope it does not require me to know any backstory. That would be crap!

jeffv541
jeffv541

WOW=dung, war2 on the otherhand...

theR34p3R
theR34p3R

I'm going to wet myself if Arthas/the Lich King really is going to be the bad guy in the Warcraft movie _0_ Anyways, I can't wait to see what this new franchise is they are cooking up. Maybe something like Borderlands or Fallout.

Teyon
Teyon

I miss the good ol days when Warcraft was an RTs. World of Warcraft is not my cup of tea. I'm glad Blizzard is doing well though. I just wish they'd let WOW fade off and do something new i nstead (or something old - looks longingly at WarCraft 2).

Qizarate
Qizarate

Are people really QQing over there being an article about Blizzard on Warcraft's 15th anniversary? Are people really bashing Blizzard for not rushing releases, for distinguishing their games from each other through distinct gameplay, and for caring about the longevity and reputation of something they have worked hard to cultivate? Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Seems like people are envious of success. If you suck at a game or just can't get into it, man up, acknowledge it (ty zeromus1337, you have my respect), and go play something else. Don't make the rest of us sort through all your bs because you can't keep your mouth shut long enough to move on and fine something truly worth complaining about. There aren't many developers who support their games like Blizzard does. A few irritating meachanics/bugs may remain, but there haven't been many, if any games even nearing the scope of a Blizzard game within the past few years that have received so much post-release support from the developer.

great_rulo
great_rulo

MAT30-, cmon, i mean, do you know what blizzard is? do you all guys actually think there's only one Blizzard office in the whole world, and every employee is working on WoW servers, patches and expansions? N-O. The only reason WC4 isnt out yet is because Blizzard likes to keep their franchise sequels sepparated by years if not decades, look at D2 and SC2, how long did it take them to simply announce them? if you want constant sequels, just google up "EA Sports".

oneligas
oneligas

Fifteen years old and it doesn't look a day over 50!

DayvM
DayvM

I would love to see Warcraft 4... maybe they could do that thing EA did and split a part off to do a seperate game If you say wow sucks, then youve got 11.5 million people after your head XD

MAT30-
MAT30-

Stop with WoW please!! a miss Blizzards RTS, i want starcratf 2 or a warcraft 4!!!

BLaZe462
BLaZe462

@humorguy_basic good point

Humorguy_basic
Humorguy_basic

They had the same article on IGN - haven't we got enough of Blizzard? I am sure there are smaller companies that have good/great titles that we have never heard of - maybe spread the news around a little bit more so we know about 70-80% of PC game releases instead of 20-30%?!

ZabuzaR
ZabuzaR

@ soulfulDAGGER First of all, saying a game is a waste of time is stupid. Most of us play games to KILL time. Unless your a pro gamer or something, all games are a waste of time. Which is not always a bad thing. Blizzard has been trying to stop gold spammers. But they can only do so much about it. And what they do to stop will probably harm other players. Not just the spammers. The 19000 gold mounts is optional. They are not forcing you to buy it. If you want it so bad, work hard for it. Outland raids are "non existent" because people want to experience the NEW content. Besides, people do pre-wrath raids once in a while. Just find the right guild and people. PvP is broken through class unbalances. If you are having horrible frame rate, then it is YOUR computer that is to blame. Not Blizzards. (though wintergrasp might be the only exception) And for faction unbalances, go to another server. I have been on servers where both sides had the same amount of players. Others had a huge amount. Blizzard also does free character transfers at times to balance things out. /end nerdrage

BLaZe462
BLaZe462

i like warcraft but i dont like wow

Darkbeyond
Darkbeyond

@ great rulo i agree with your comments

Darkbeyond
Darkbeyond

Okay first i got to say LONG LIVE BLIZZARD AND WARCRAFT. And for all you people who don't like WoW its either A:you've nevwer played it or dont like Warcraft which is fine its your choice. But for everyone who complains about the monthly fee thing or graphics i got two things to say to you..... Game Play over Graphics and stop being so God damn cheap $15 hardly isn't much at all. And yes i feel strongly of WoW cause its awesome. And for everyone who thinks people who play WoW have no Social life i agree in some cases it true but millions who play WoW have great social life. But yeh Warcraft IV please and better graphics are coming hopefulley but like i said before Game Play over Graphics-Dark

Killingspree303
Killingspree303

Oh yeah, nice making it so far Warcraft! I really hope that Blizzard will make a new Warcraft RTS someday soon. @alkaline_DnB It is Warcraft (the franchise) that is 15 years old. World of Warcraft (MMO) is only 5 years old. There's a BIG difference between Warcraft and WoW :P

great_rulo
great_rulo

Now to the graphics "issue", try looking up in youtube for the videos "Unbelievable wow scenes" and "Wrath of the Lich King max settings HD" then you're free to trash talk the graphics as much as you want. One last thing on the month fee, THINK about it for just a minute, how much do you pay monthly for new games? 60 bucks i believe, what's the price for the core WoW? 30-40 bucks and it includes a free month of play, now, what's the longevity of the average console game you pay for? 5-15 hours and you'll never touch it again, longevity of WoW? nigh infinite, let's say you want more WoW after your first month expired, 15 bucks and you have another month of play you of which you'll enjoy every second, simply because it doesnt force you to go one way only, you dont even have to level up to see the depth of the game, so no matter what you do, there's always a new thing waiting for you to discover it, tired of questing? go explore the 2 continents of the game. After my 360 broke and MS denied to repair it in late january, i was tempted to buy a new console, but WoW kept my gaming needs satisfied for nearly 8 months, only for 120 bucks total i had enough virtual entertaining for 8 damn months, while i could've payed for a new console, let's say 200$ + the new games, assuming each lasted me a whole month which is more than the average nowadays game lasts, or even 2-3 movies in the cinema per week, it still saved a bunch of money.

great_rulo
great_rulo

Now, i've been playing games ever since i was 5 years old, seen all the ups and downs of the gaming industry, from the Nintendo reign, through the amazing revolution of Sony, to their cataclysm during the last days of the PS2, and to this date where 3 companies rule the market with arguably similar quality games, and believe me, i HAVE played a lot of games from all walks of the earth, some JRPG jewels(the FF franchise before Kingdom Hearts for instance), great WRPGs(first fallout games, Diablo in general, even a few Elder Scrolls, including the poorly developed but praised nonetheless Oblivion), what i consider the best FPS in the market(Half Life, F.E.A.R. Perfect Dark, Doom, the CoD franchise, overated but good), excluding some i've yet to play, like Counter Strike, SystemShock, Thief and a few others. Havent had the luck of getting into the RTS world, though, and the only game that has kept me playing for months was WoW, it's not my favorite game, but if there is one video game close to being the best ever, it is World of Warcraft, do you not enjoy end game raiding? go Player vs Player, hop on your horse and go find a tranquil lake and enjoy the view, or fish, maybe level your professions to become a master Chief, Blacksmither, Alchemist, Leatheworker, Jewelcrafter, Engineer or just save the materiel then sell 'em on the auction house, join a Role Playing server and let your imagination go wild

dentui
dentui

@Jim60360 The fact that you read past the first paragraph means you care.

alkaline_DnB
alkaline_DnB

For the Horde! yep, WoW is the untoppable king of MMOs...many try to be like it, but never come close to succeeding. SWtOR will be next in line to join the ranks of MMOs who have tried, but just couldn't cut it. Grats on Lvl 15 Warcraft!

Jim60360
Jim60360

there is nothing on this earth i care less about, infact, why the hell did i just read that?

great_rulo
great_rulo

It's surprisingly amusing to see all the idiots blindly trash talking WoW, 15 bucks a month for a game? man, now im sure there's no chance on earth even 1/4 of, let's say, Halo 3/CoD online population would pay even 5$ per month to play, know why? no, lower your hand, Billy, it's not because you're smart, it's because it AINT WORTH IT. On the other hand, know why i've NEVER ever seen the "expensive" monthly fee topic brought up on conversation topics between WoW players? no, lower your hand, Johnny, it's not because they're addicted or they dont have anything better to pay for, it's because World of Warcraft is constantly getting improved if not graphic wisely, 'cause this kind of game is not about graphics, AND IT IS WORTH IT, kids, read next message.

lowerpass
lowerpass

Warcraft IV pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeee . I really miss that game. I just hope there are some passionate people in Blizzard who wants to make warcraft IV.

_Emperor
_Emperor

@ soulfulDAGGER "Hundreds of thousands of players buy gold yet Blizzard does NOTHING about it." Ofc they do, stop being so ignorant and blind "PVP is broken due to the horrible frame rates" No, YOUR computer is broken...don't blame the game system because your computer can't handle it. As those WoW players say: You sir, are full of fail

southwardraptor
southwardraptor

Meh not a big fan but still 15 years is a commendable achievement

katanajut
katanajut

I have Warcraft III RoC + FT, enjoyed the game quite a bit a few years back. Played WoW demo (10 days), it was fun but I don't want to get addicted to it so I don't think that I'm going to buy it. Starcraft series and Diablo series were awesome, hope Starcraft II and Diablo III will be fun aswell.

Sir_Ice
Sir_Ice

Well, 5 years have not been enough to correct the graphic glitches in the Stormwind AH or the irritating bug that allows mobs to shoot through trees, rocks and other obstacles and hit the player. Maybe Blizzard will actually do some fine quality work and fix issues that are present since version 1.0 instead of just counting their money.

Zeromus1337
Zeromus1337

It's definitely an achievement that the series has lasted so long, but at the same time it's relatively unsurprising, given how dedicated Blizzard are. I remember trying the game out last December, but I simply couldn't get into it. It wasn't the game itself, but the fact that I really had no one to play with. A few people I know originally promised to re-roll for me, but that ultimately didn't happen, and after one week, I had stopped. I was always curious about WoW, and for only $15, I was able to see what all the fuss was about, even though it was short-lived. :)

Katmando4Life
Katmando4Life

@ paulmorr12 "Come on blizzard! The only real reason you are working so hard on wow is the fact that you are making so much money off it." Um, yeah? Are you stupid? Do you think they're going to stop working on their big moneymaker? They're a business. Blizzard has an obligation to their fans and investors to continually provide the highest possible quality to keep that money coming in. I give Blizzard a lot of credit for making such a successful series of products.

ganges40
ganges40

You guys say that Xbox Live is cheaper,and it is.And,what about PSN?For me is perfect,I only need to play online,and it's free!Uncharted 2,Killzone,Demon's Souls,they're far far and far better than WoW,and free to play online! WoW it's a drug,because it vitiates the people,and controls the mind,if the victim is not prepared

ganges40
ganges40

WoW destroyed Warcraft as a RTS... In this 15 years,5 were throwed away,I really don't like WoW. Le me give an example:In a quest(of WoW)you need to find 10 feathers.Guy!A bird has thousands of feathers,and you need to kill one hundred birds to get ONE feather!This is nonsense!And the missions of Warcraft 3!Somebody remember?"Destroy the four shamans,before they make a spell that puts the Lich King as the Supreme Lord of Azeroth"A bit smarter,isn't it?

Cwagmire21
Cwagmire21

Blizzard makes high quality stuff. The only reason I didn't like the original Warcraft is because I don't really care for RTSes. Blizzard hasn't disappointed me yet.

downloadthefile
downloadthefile

Xfire is not reliable to see how popular games are, they only have slightly more than 50,000 people playing WoW and even signing in when they play. Same goes for other games, plus Xfire gets way more people logging in it when playing FPS compared to an MMO where they can use vent.

Dynamo11
Dynamo11

@athenian29 Yeah no joke, me and my friends were like WTF?!

trodeback
trodeback

I played WoW for a while but like so many others I quit due to the redundancy of the game and the cost of play. I might consider going back to it if the cost was reduced but that isn't going to happen. If they can maintain 11.5 mil players with the current charges they aren't going to lower it any time soon.

MehowPwned
MehowPwned

Well I still hope for a Warcraft 4 or faster release of SC2 Since Im kinda tired of waiting 11 years for SC 2 and I've been kinda long time board of WoW

soulfulDAGGER
soulfulDAGGER

I could see WoW being released for consoles. It would be neat but Activision would loose money on it. OK, they sell the 360/PS3/Wii versions for say $49.99 which would include both expansions. They would need a monthly fee in order to care for the massive server farms it would need for consoles. Unless the games' monthly fee is $5 or something people wouldn't pay it AND pay for Xbox live. It could be possible but would need a lot of research. I don't think they would allow the game to be played for free. And honestly i wouldn't want to see the game released for consoles it would do more harm than good. Could you imagine all the scamming/spamming that would happen with the gold sellers? It's all about money though so anything is possible.

MrCha1nsaw
MrCha1nsaw

Man I wasted 3 years of my life on WoW....I kinda miss it sometimes though. I would only play again if they got rid of that annoying fee....or just lowered it. Xbox live is cheaper =)

soulfulDAGGER
soulfulDAGGER

World Of Warcraft is the biggest waste of time in videogaming. I uninstalled the game last night. (all 16 gigs of it.) The game gives nothing tangeable back to it's players. Blizzard/Activision could give a crap about it's regular paying customers. How about some free game time for players who have paid at least 5-6 months? How about ridding the game of all the gold spammers. Hundreds of thousands of players buy gold yet Blizzard does NOTHING about it. The more i see all the gold spammers, the more i belive that Blizzard employees are behind the gold sites. They could easily rid the game of gold spammers but they don't because the players who have al the good stuff are envied by those who don't. It's envy. It's hard to compete with players who buy gold. 19000gold for a mammoth mount. 17000 gold for a chopper/motocycle mount. The raids in Outland are pretty much non existant. PVP is broken due to the horrible frame rates; it's hard to fight in it. The different races (especially the Alliance) keep getting cut down to size. The Alliance is weaker than ever. Blizzard does this to kick up the population of the Horde. All the money players spend playing the game is sickening. When it's all said and done and they realize they have gained nothing real from the game. Not even a free t-shirt. Not even a free sticker. Nothing. There's SOME good stories here and there out of the game. But overall this is the brainwashing that WoW/Activision Blizzard has done. If it turns out that Blizzard employees are behind the gold selling sites, a cataclysm will occur in Activisions bank accounts.

paulmorr12
paulmorr12

Come on blizzard! The only real reason you are working so hard on wow is the fact that you are making so much money off it. Real warcraft fans would like a warcraft 4.

ndntt44
ndntt44

thank you xNationalx, now I just lost The Game, great....

EpicGoofy
EpicGoofy

WoW will be around as long as the internet is around? Not if they don't update their graphics :/ A way to play WoW without grinding or constantly planning raids would be very nice, and a smaller monthly subscription would be too.

Zerosumgame
Zerosumgame

9.3, 9.2, 9.3, 9.2, 9.5, 9.2, 9.0. 8.0 7.6 6.7 5.1 2.1 1.0 0.5 -1.1 .... RIP. F!