Sony executive to testify before Congress about PSN attack - Report

The Atlantic reports the president of Sony Network Entertainment, Tim Schaff, will ascend Capitol Hill next week to explain data breach, three-week outage.

At the beginning of the month, a US Congressional subcommittee looking into the PlayStation Network outage and data leak asked Sony Computer Entertainment America chairman and Sony Corp. executive vice president Kaz Hirai to testify. The hope was that his testimony would answer questions about the three-week PSN downtime and the data breach that compromised 77 million users' personal information.

A Sony executive will testify before congress next week.

Tokyo-based Hirai didn't make the trip to Congress but did provide a detailed list of answers to the subcommittee's questions. Now, the Atlantic reports that Sony will indeed send a high-level executive to testify before the US House of Representatives' Committee on Energy and Commerce's Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade. Ken Johnson, an aide to subcommittee chairwoman Mary Bono Mack (R-CA), told the magazine that Tim Schaff, president of Sony Network Entertainment, would testify before the subcommittee next week.

"While Chairman Bono Mack remains critical of Sony's initial handling of the data breaches, she also is appreciative that the company has now agreed to testify," said Johnson. "The Chairman firmly believes that the lessons learned from…the Sony…experiences can be instructive and guide us as we develop comprehensive data protection legislation. We expect to introduce that legislation, which will provide new safeguards for American consumers, in the next few weeks."

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84 comments
Tevi
Tevi

[This message was deleted at the request of a moderator or administrator]

Tevi
Tevi

[This message was deleted at the request of a moderator or administrator]

Chrono_Shift
Chrono_Shift

Crap, Sony needs to have a chat with Gameshark or Action Replay about getting some codes for invincibility.

r4v1rsm
r4v1rsm

"three-week" more like "four-week" :/

ArabrockermanX
ArabrockermanX

@WolfGrey When was it proven false? Remember that expert would be looking at legal consequences if he used false information not to mention his reputation. Its easy for gamespot and other media to mud-sling(they fall under freedom of press to a degree) but people testifying have a responsibility and can face legal repercussions if they are bluntly wrong. Also for Sony whats saying they have a firewall mean? They could have a 15 year old firewall and say they had one because it doesn't matter how well that firewall protects all they are doing is saying they had one. Grow up and quit being a fan-boy the fact that it took them so long to respond and update their security shows it was out of date. The ps3 is still my favorite system but the fact remains that Sony ****ed up.

DARKNESSxEAGLE
DARKNESSxEAGLE

and WolfGrey got those thumbs down because...? Whatever, hackers, most likely pirates of the games they do like anyway, attacking Sony repeatedly? If they were good enough to stay undetected through all that then maybe they should get a job and contribute something to the world. And Samox.... Samox, Samox, Samox What the sh**, you think sony didn't try to protect that data?! the only ones at fault here are hackers with nothing better to do.

DesertLynx83
DesertLynx83

Supposedly the hackers have said they're going to attack Sony again and again until they're destroyed...when will it end?

servb0ts
servb0ts

US Congressional got Sony by its Meat an Potatoes!

Yams1980
Yams1980

can't trust sony ever again

WolfGrey
WolfGrey

@Samox You do realize that "experts" info was proven false right? That even Sony themselves said they had firewalls on the personal information. Alot of flinging mud around here, and alot of people who didnt read up on everything they could and check the facts.

Samox
Samox

@Mike_Labeckio Yeah... except i'm not storing thousands of peoples personal information in my house. If I was, I probably would have all latest, most up-to-date security measures, as it would be my responsibility to protect those peoples information to the best of my ability. Sony was skimpy with it's security, and now they're paying for it.

guertt
guertt

I finnally know why they have one that. Its because they want ps3 owners to pass there school test and become great employers with a good job and buy more ps4 and win the next gen battle ;) pretty wise move lol Now if they can just put psstore back so I can play dirt3 with my friends :)

route151
route151

It is not Sony's fault, nor the hackers, it is ignorance to blame. Hence a question period. Many people got schooled in this lesson. Now let's show the work on how Sony found the answer. More so, how can we improve as a collective?

zennioparty
zennioparty

Cmacinnis, They are the US government. This got to a LOT of US Citizens. This very well within their rights.

cmacinnis
cmacinnis

That's hilarious! The fact that one guy could do this is pretty awesome, considering how high any mighty Sony always acts. They were overdue for a kick in the pants, and they finally got it. But seriously, talking to congress, it's about video games for god sake, hold a hearing for something important, with more global impact.

valium88
valium88

I think it is great that the american government take this seriously, and that a Sony executive get seated on an airplane to explain this mess in detail is only appropriate. Only problem is that the real sinners in this case, who can steal identities probably just as easy can hide their own.

Randal__Graves
Randal__Graves

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

thuban
thuban

the only reason the "hackers" took the psn is that they found an opening, these guys are just after infamy, they dont care who its from or who they effected. thats why its termed "cyber TERRORISM". unfortunately now that this has happened.. im certain that someone will eventually get into XBLIVEs servers aswell.. theres simply more "hackers" out there than security techs.. hell, most of the good IT security were once "hackers"

JusticeFromSeed
JusticeFromSeed

@ItchyIsVegeta It's a hearing, not a court appearance. They're trying to determine if any wrong was done and to sort things out. If Sony had blatantly and obviously done something wrong and criminal charges were issued, then, yes, they would answer to the judicial branch. At this point, the gov is merely asking the same thing everybody else is - WTF, exactly, just happened, and how did it happen? Who asks the questions doesn't matter in the end, in my opinion, so long as the questions get asked and answered.

ItchyIsVegeta
ItchyIsVegeta

Get them to testify in front of congress, try to get them to slip up while testifying, then get them for a perjury charge. Just like they do with every other scandal, they try to make political. Someone explain to me why a US Citizen should have to testify in front of the Legislative branch of the government, not the Judicial branch. Bunch of commies trying to run this country.

wiidsduelpack
wiidsduelpack

Congress could work on better things like regulation of industries. For starters, abolish the extension of the Bush tax cuts.

dograw75
dograw75

@HollowNinja The government hires people that do all sorts of things in the interest of National Security (or at least under the guise of it) that would otherwise be illegal. They hire people that are experts at breaking and entering, political insurrection, even murder. To say an activity is not criminal because the government does it is a poor argument, because many illicit activities from the mundane, (like labor laws) to the exteme, (like assassinations, or dealing with terrorists) are illegal unles the government does them, with what is deemed by them to be good cause.

HollowNinja
HollowNinja

@Mike_Labeckio: Hacking is nothing like breaking and entering. The government employs hackers themselves.

Sigil-otaku
Sigil-otaku

@Mike_Labeckio My house, ran by me, cannot be likened to a database of millions of peoples personal information run by one of the biggest companies in the world. Sony had many issues with it's security such as lack of encryption on personal information (only encrypted CC details), no fire wall and even then it's security software was out of date. You know I don't even let my anti virus software get out of date and it's on a PC that doesn't store personal information of millions. The hackers are at fault for hacking, Sony is at fault for not making a secure server or protecting the data with encryption. Even though I've stated 3 things they were at fault with interviews could leave us to believe there was more, such as not having a dedicated team to monitor it's safety as they stated only after it occured they were making a new position for a network security monitor or something like that. I'm not a baseball fan but the usual 3 strikes and your out analogy seems appropriate here, how many mistakes are you allowed with so much private data at stake?

Mike_Labeckio
Mike_Labeckio

I know most of you can't separate Sony from their employees who somehow have had their free will surgically removed. After Sony's lay off of some 200+ employees the PSN quickly became a target for hackers. For all we know Sony's management was doing their job, while their employees were just doing enough to hopefully help them keep their jobs. Try to separate the two just like most of you swiftly attempt to separate HACKING from stealing and call it PHISHING. Hackers infiltrate server, home technology for the purposes of discovery or we can call it information gathering. Just because a hacker doesn't acquire financial data doesn't mean they are right. To say a hacker is right would be no different then justifying some who broke into your house, and didn't steal anything. [Smart guy stating] "He just looked around, he do anything wrong!" My answer would be "really?" Just looking around you automatically gain something called information about or intelligence against your victim. Too many people just want to justify a crime and one way is to force a change to the meaning of words.

Mike_Labeckio
Mike_Labeckio

@Samox If your house gets broken into, just remember it's ALL YOUR FAULT!!!! Hope you have all the latest house security equipment along with a paid for monitoring service, because if you don't it's your fault and if you have insurance they shouldn't have to pay you crap because you didn't have the so-called up-to-date security equipment.

Hairbautt
Hairbautt

If the Consumer Protection Agency worked as it should, wouldn't this be a job for them?

JamilAhmed1994
JamilAhmed1994

@Maverick51510: How would he need luck to give money?

Snicker-Man
Snicker-Man

i couldnt log in is anybody else having trouble logging?

idk95
idk95

I can't log on my ps3 now what the hell sony!

Ex-DarkBlade
Ex-DarkBlade

Doesn't Congress have something better to do like fixing our debt and the economy.

PixelAddict
PixelAddict

Sony needs to enter an invincibility code. Stat.

Maverick51510
Maverick51510

To: oscarsephiroth Yeah, Good luck giving Microsoft all your money. While Sony won't charge me ANYTHING.

lunaticrichard
lunaticrichard

the data protection legislation will never happen . the big company's will not stand for stricter rules . it will cost them loads of money ! and since they are really good in greasing palms ...... the trade of consumer data is what keeps a lot of company's afloat these day's.

Torinir
Torinir

@Incubus420 A Congressional hearing isn't a court case. A court merely interprets the law. Congress writes the laws. Sony's testimony may cause new laws to be written about data security, both against intrusion and to ensure adequate protection is provided by the holders of that data.

ZICO11
ZICO11

@oscarsephiroth and how do we care?

oscarsephiroth
oscarsephiroth

well i guess i'll stick with microsoft for online.

Ryozo
Ryozo

Comments like dstv's - and the others which have cropped up on other articles about this incident which advocate torture and turning a blind eye to rape - are not only entirely out of place. Never mind that there are far worthier targets for the SEALs and their ilk out there.

VirtualTofu
VirtualTofu

Better get ready to start cranking out those free games, Sony!

Samox
Samox

I'm glad Sony is being held responsible for it's poor security. Running on an unpatched Apache server without a firewall is ridiculous. Hopefully more companies will take security more seriously now after this whole mess.

Incubus420
Incubus420

I think this is BS if Sony is getting summoned to court to get embarrassed about the situation that they were put in. The had the stand privacy policy in place that about 80% of companyies are currently operating under. The fact of the matter is, Congress should be working with them to assist them in apprehending the guys that did this to them.

HollowNinja
HollowNinja

Unlike some of the others here, I'm glad that the government is getting involved. This will all hopefully lead to a better Sony in the future.

WolfGrey
WolfGrey

How nice of them to still badger Sony.I mean they already answered all their questions multiple times.And had the FBI and homeland security with them.Why dont you just ask them instead? I mean really? Only america does this crap.

Spacerac
Spacerac

Data protection legislation? Silver lining :)

Fajonkel
Fajonkel

People really need to stop complaining about "oh, we have better stuff to do". Of course, because a day out of time in Congress due to the stealing of personal information by 77 million people (I believe statistics said 25 mill of which I in the US, correct me if I'm wrong). We can't ignore every single issue because there's something bigger. There's ALWAYS something bigger. In that case, everyone should stop what they're doing and devote their lives to cancer research.