Six Days in Fallujah: The Untold Story

In 2009, Konami announced it would no longer be publishing the Atomic Games-developed Six Days in Fallujah. Three years on, we speak to Atomic president Peter Tamte about the events that inspired the controversial title, the impact of Konami's decision, and the road ahead.

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On April 27, 2009, Japanese daily newspaper Asahi Shimbun published comments from a Konami representative explaining the company's decision to back out of a publishing deal with developer Atomic Games over Six Days in Fallujah, a military shooter where the aim was to accurately re-create one of the bloodiest battles of the Iraq War, which elicited some controversy:

"After seeing the reaction to the video game in the United States and hearing opinions sent through phone calls and e-mail, we decided … not to sell it."

Atomic was caught by surprise. Konami had expressed its enthusiasm for the title just three weeks earlier, officially unveiling the game at a press event in San Francisco earlier the same month. By early May, the deal was off. As Konami made every effort to distance itself from Six Days in Fallujah, Atomic was left with no publisher, a half-finished game, and a steady torrent of bad press.

So, what went wrong? What caused Konami to abandon a project that had the backing of Iraqi war veterans and the aim to change expectations of what a video game can be?

First contact

Atomic Games was first approached by the United States Marine Corps (USMC) in 2002 with a request to redesign the Close Combat series--a real-time tactical war game modelled after the Avalon Hill-developed board game Advanced Squad Leader and published by Microsoft--for specific USMC training purposes. By 2003, Atomic was working closely with the Marine Corps on developing a number of different training systems.

It was during the development of one of these systems--based on Atomic's squad-based military first-person shooter First to Fight--that the USMC assigned its first dozen or so Marines to help guide Atomic on everything from room-clearing tactics to weapon accuracy. Most of the Marines walking around the Atomic studio during that time had just returned from fighting in Operation Iraqi Freedom, the first major military operation against Iraq by the United States. (The operation began on March 19, 2003, and ended on May 1, 2003, following an announcement made by then-US President George W Bush declaring the end of combat operations in Iraq.)

As Marines came and went, the same faces began to pop up again and again, until eventually Atomic development staff found themselves working with a core group of about a dozen Marines, most of them from the 3/1 unit (a battalion-level infantry and support personnel unit). Despite the fact that the group only met twice a year, friendships formed easily.

Atomic president Peter Tamte recalls that he knew the Marines were due to be deployed to Fallujah, but that no one at the studio knew anything about the battle until it was all over.

"It wasn't until they returned that we found out more than 40 percent of the 3/1 battalion was either killed or wounded in battle," Tamte told GameSpot.

The first Marine to contact Atomic after the battle was a sergeant who had been medevacked out of the area during the fighting. He wondered whether Tamte and his team would be interested in making a game based on his and other Marines' experiences of the conflict. Atomic said yes.

"Fortunately, while some had been wounded, all of the Marines we knew returned from Iraq," Tamte said. "They told us stories about Fallujah that reminded me of the World War II stories I grew up hearing, stories about 18-21-year-olds thrown into perilous situations where they have the opportunity to prove to themselves, and the world, what kind of humans they are. They have to make fundamental decisions not just about life and death, but about what they hold as their most important values."

When the Marines expressed interest in re-creating their experiences of Fallujah in the form of a video game, Tamte saw it as a chance to stretch the limits of the medium. After that, the stories started flowing: stories about creeping through darkened warehouses, schools, and homes; stories about ambushes and face-to-face combat; stories about Iraqi insurgents taking so much liquid adrenaline before a gunfight that it often took six or seven shots to bring them down.

"The biggest difference I noticed in the Marines before and after Fallujah was the realisation that the enemy was much tougher than we thought," Tamte said. "While there were certainly many tough fights during the initial Marine movement in 2003 from Kuwait to Baghdad, the battle for Fallujah was as tough as anything I had heard about from the Vietnam War or World War II."

"I met with Marines who, after being wounded, would get treatment and then beg to return to their unit because they didn't want their closest friends battling this enemy without their help."

The conflict in Fallujah

The Second Battle of Fallujah, or Operation Phantom Fury--labelled as the most heated urban firefight in recent US military history since the 1968 battle of Hue in Vietnam--was a joint US, British, and Iraqi offensive in November and December 2004. It was designed to clear the town of Fallujah of the Iraqi insurgency (estimated to be around 2000-3000 strong) ahead of the national Iraqi elections scheduled for January 2005. (The city of roughly 250,000 inhabitants had become a hiding place for Iraqi insurgents following the First Battle of Fallujah in April 2004, which saw the US Marines attack the city following the killing of four Blackwater security contractors.)

The combined US, Coalition, and British casualties following the end of the conflict numbered just over 200 fatalities and 1,000 wounded. It was later reported that thousands of Iraqi civilians died during the combined First and Second Battles of Fallujah, with a further estimated 200,000 people losing their homes in the conflict. (The Washington Post estimated that over 25 percent of the all the city's 39,000 homes were destroyed during the fighting, the intensity of which has been well documented.)

The aftermath offered little respite. Reports of anti-US sentiment in Fallujah gave way to renewed fighting between insurgents and US troops in the region, leading to the growing realisation that Fallujah had become a cautionary tale rather than a success story for the US military. Then, in 2010, came disturbing evidence of a possible link between battlefield residue and a dramatic spike in birth defects, cancer, leukaemia, and infant mortality in Fallujah.

Writing for The Guardian in December 2011, former US Marine and Fallujah veteran Ross Caputi spoke of his regret at the role he played in the 2004 conflict:

"It has been seven years, and the lies that justified the assault still perpetuate false beliefs about what we did. The US veterans who fought there still do not understand who they fought against, or what they were fighting for."

Did Tamte realise what he was walking into?

"I've spoken with very few people who have a Marine or Iraqi's understanding of the events [in Fallujah]," he said. "[But] wouldn't it be better for everyone if we gained this understanding while these events are unfolding, rather than waiting until it doesn't matter anymore?"

Tamte, who served as Bungie's executive vice-president from 1999 to 2001 before leaving to start Destineer Games and later acquiring Atomic Games in 2005, said that the goal of Six Days in Fallujah has always been to use the experiences, actions, and consequences of Marines fighting in the Fallujah conflict to give players a deeper understanding of the violent events that have helped shape recent history, while simultaneously changing expectations of what a video game can be.

"We had no reservations about making a video game about Fallujah--then or now," he said. "We've always seen Six Days in Fallujah as the opportunity to give people a better understanding of our post-9/11 world, and the different attitudes and cultures that are shaping it."

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times in April 2009, Fallujah veteran and consultant on the game Mike Ergo highlighted the importance of video games as a storytelling medium for a new generation that responds to interactive experiences in a way that no other generation has.

"Video games can communicate the intensity and the gravity of war to an audience who wouldn’t necessarily be watching the History Channel or reading about this in the classroom," Ergo told the Times. "In an age when everyone's always online or playing games, people's imaginations aren't what they were, sadly. For this group, books may not convey the same level of intensity and chaos of war that a game can."

Tamte agrees.

"We can do things in a video game that other forms of media can't, because we can make you the protagonist. Rather than watching somebody on a movie screen make tough split-second decisions, we can let you make these decisions yourself."

Konami, the fallout, and the road ahead

Tamte's vision for Six Days in Fallujah remains unchanged. The game uses Marines' accounts of the events in Fallujah to re-create a six-day period in the lives of several units fighting on the ground. Authenticity comes in the form of video interviews of Marines recounting their experiences of the battle, interspersed throughout the game, as well as near-perfect re-creations of Fallujah neighbourhoods using satellite photography.

Atomic wants everything in the game to be destructible, from individual bricks to entire buildings, in order to accurately re-create the intensity of urban combat and the complications that arise from situations that involve fighting in close quarters in a civilian-heavy environment. To achieve this, the development team built the game on a new game engine designed to handle realistic structural damage to infrastructure. (However, this engine was built for the current generation of hardware, which Tamte said will end before Six Days is ready. Atomic said it is not yet ready to reveal how this will affect the game's design.)

Despite so much of the game being based on the personal accounts of Marines who were there at the time, Tamte is resolute that neither he nor his team at Atomic are making a judgment call on what happened. The game, he insists, is not about whether the US or its allies should have invaded Iraq--it's about players experiencing something real.

"Many military shooters are a lot of fun to play, but they lack authenticity," he said. "At some point, you know what you're playing is a fictional account invented by game guys. A lot of the value of Six Days in Fallujah comes from the knowledge that you're experiencing what really happened."

(Tamte and his team decided against allowing players to assume the role of Iraqi insurgents in the game, choosing to tell the story from the point of view of the US and Iraqi forces. However, Tamte said that there will be a few non-US roles in the game, which are still being decided.)

But it was this emphasis on re-creating reality--a reality that at the time of Six Days in Fallujah's unveiling in 2009 was all too current--which led to widespread criticism of the game.

"There is nothing to celebrate in the death of people resisting an unjust and bloody occupation," British anti-war group Stop the War Coalition told media in April 2009.

"To make a game out of a war crime and to capitalise on the death and injury of thousands is sick. There will never be a time when it is appropriate for people to 'play' at committing atrocities. The massacre in Fallujah should be remembered with shame and horror, not glamorised and glossed over for entertainment."

Three weeks later, Konami cancelled its publishing deal with Atomic. Tamte said that the decision came as a shock to Atomic, which up to that point had received nothing but support from the publisher.

"There were literally no disagreements between Atomic and Konami's American team. We all saw Six Days in Fallujah the same way. It was the board of directors for Konami's parent company in Japan who just got freaked out about the controversy."

Tamte said that the board of directors of Konami's parent company in Japan ordered the US unit to pull out of Six Days because Konami "didn't want its brand associated with the controversy". He still believes this was a mistake.

"I think if they had waited longer to let our story be heard, they would have benefited from the outpouring of support we've received for Six Days in Fallujah as people began to understand more about what it really was contemplate new ideas about what a video game could be. This takes time. Unfortunately, Konami's board of directors didn't seem to understand."

More surprising than Konami's decision to walk away from Six Days in Fallujah was the amount of encouragement and feedback Atomic received following the loss of its biggest financial backer, including more offers of help from Marines who were eager to take part in the game's development. The challenge that Tamte and his team now face is gathering the money needed to finish the game, although not necessarily from another publisher.

"I would not say that we're focused on finding a publisher. Our focus is on finding adequate funding. The rest can get worked out."

Last year, Tamte started a new company, Theory.io, specialising in productivity software for tablets, mobile phones, and computers. While Theory.io won't be involved in Six Days in Fallujah, Tamte will still be involved with the project until its release, for which there is still no set time frame. While Tamte recognises that there will always be some people who don't want to see Six Days in Fallujah get made, the outpouring of support that Atomic has received has convinced him that the team's efforts will not go to waste.

"I know that the story we're going to help people experience is compelling. And, ultimately, this is what matters the most."

GameSpot contacted Konami for its side of the story, but the publisher declined to comment.

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Discussion

255 comments
Grimmstark
Grimmstark

I believe Peter was referring to me in his interview, I am the Sergeant who contacted him immediately after being medically evacuated out of Iraq. Many of the comments posted here are meaningful, constructive, and surprisingly well informed. I wanted to make a brief comment regarding some of the controversy revolving around this project. I too never believed we had good reason to be in Iraq. Our mission changed drastically between my first and second deployments to Iraq. I could literally feel the spin doctors in D.C. changing our mission to suit the ever evolving situation. However, it is totally irrelevant what I, an Infantry Sergeant in the Marine Corps, felt about the war. The point is that I served in an institution that is itself among the noblest in all of American society. That I did what I was told to and did it well. I vote in elections and I am proud to be a part of the democratic process. I was not a supporter of former President Bush and was quick to voice political views in opposition to most of his policies. But that is not the point. The stories being told were meant to be the experiences of young warriors faced with life and death situations. Not just the possibility of their own deaths but the possible deaths of their friends, comrades, and brothers. The “game” was not meant to be an endorsement of the war, but a story that could be experienced, and not just told. I am sure that there are equally as compelling stories that could be told from the other side. But I can only speak about my own experiences and what happened to me. Peter and the men and women that worked at Destineer and Atomic Games are amazing people. Of course they wanted to have a profitable project, but there was integrity and forward thinking, and a real care for the sensitivity of the topic they were dealing with. I truly hope that this project sees the light of day. The entertainment industry needs to be more open minded, and this medium is perfect. I haven’t spoken to Peter in years but I hope they are able to figure something out. Good luck brother!

jaspertodd
jaspertodd

I realy wish they would put this up on Kickstarter.Iam sure there are alot of fans that would throw in $$ to have this made.And if they did make the game i realy hope they tell the story 100%...I see nothing wrong with it.Its war its a ugly thing,but its also a part of our lives.

mohamedmounem
mohamedmounem

i hope video games always search 4 the truth in the history and dont twist facts ...cuz its stay in the mind wat the player have seen on a video game ...W.Bush lied to the US troops and to the american ppl ...war is not good on any way in any time ..its only bring hatred between humans ...i played all COD BF MOH series just for having good gaming time.. it dosent effect my judgment on ppl = they r all good = a very few is the bad ..

Greetings 4 all of u  from Iraq

GrahamZ
GrahamZ

The problem with learning history from games is that they can only give a very narrow and distorted snapshot of history, without any context.  You get all the weapons and tactics, which may be interesting, but without the rest of it, it's shallow and meaningless.  Battles are not unimportant, but with no historical context, it's just trivia.

kakashi552
kakashi552

"They have to make fundamental decisions not just about life and death, but about what they hold as their most important values."

 

sheesh, guys, have you learned nothing from MGS4? proxies and all? War has changed.

AndrewII
AndrewII

Glad Konami had the courage in cutting the ties with game because it was just another tool for the warmongers. Secondly,I don't know how anybody could call a war built and promoted with lies a mistake..

pidow
pidow

It is sad when an idea is supported by the people being portrayed and a company is not will to continue with something because a "few" are afraid of the truth.  I am a vet, would have liked to know why I was in Vietnam and why it ended as it did.  Whats, and whys and howcomes, why nots?  Once lives are lost, their "Must be a reason for that lost".  That war, was a long time ago, many are fighting, today, tomorrow and the next day.....and  who will tell there story?.

immortality20
immortality20

Yet another case of fans and gamers (yes lots of gamers complained too) not letting this medium grow. We're too afraid of rights, war, rape to truely build a game that is beyond what we experience now. Someone has to take that first step and just do it. Our medium is over 30 years old, it's time we act mature.

basyong
basyong

Why don't they do a kickstarter?

nyran125
nyran125

heres the thing ......

 

I actually learned MORE about World war 2 because of games like BF1942 and Call of duty 1 and COD 2 and DDay with Medal of honor allied assault than i ever did with saving private Ryan (Saving Private Ryans only realistic scene was DDay, Steven Spielbergs intention is NO different to what these game developers are trying to express).

 

If you make it realistic as hell, you are actually TEACHING people more about what is really happening and more about the rights and wrongs of the world, than if you make things a semi believable turkey shoot like the recent Medal of honors warfighters (pretending to tell an authentic story) and Battlefield 3's and Bad Companys of this world.

 

Such a shame, hope this doesnt get canned.

UndertheArchway
UndertheArchway

It is things like this that continue to hold gaming back. Difficult topics are part of life and are reflected in many other mediums: There are countless films / plays / paintings and even songs that deal with very difficult topics both fictional and real so why should gaming be any different?

boredom_kills
boredom_kills

I think one of the big issues here running under the surface is that 'Six Days in Fallujah' is referred to as a game. It seems to me from reading the article that the intention was for it to be more an interactive history lesson than a game. I have mixed feelings about it all though - I can't decide if this is a shallow attempt to cash in on a current war, or a genuine attempt to expand the medium from what it is to something newer, bigger and somehow more valid.

jhonMalcovich
jhonMalcovich

The poblem is, from reading this article, I couldn´t confirm that they are gonna show us the truth about that battle. But they will rather focus on realism of the combat, destructible environments, close quater combat and the atmosphere of urban fighting .

They will not expand on the theme that one of the US participants stated in the following fashion:

 

Writing for The Guardian in December 2011, former US Marine and Fallujah veteran Ross Caputi spoke of his regret at the role he played in the 2004 conflict:

"It has been seven years, and the lies that justified the assault still perpetuate false beliefs about what we did. The US veterans who fought there still do not understand who they fought against, or what they were fighting for."

 

And this part of the article is pretty confusing:

 

"Despite so much of the game being based on the personal accounts of Marines who were there at the time, Tamte is resolute that neither he nor his team at Atomic are making a judgment call on what happened. The game, he insists, is not about whether the US or its allies should have invaded Iraq--it's about players experiencing something real."

 

So as I understand they will just focus on relaism rather than on dillema issues. Realistic combat, destructible environments, close quater combat and the atmosphere of urban fighting sound like glorifing US marines rather than exposing the truth.

 

 

ruythalacker
ruythalacker

Funny to read about the controversy of this game and then sea some Medal Of Honor guys say that their game is authentic and based on real stories. So why are they not a controversy.... probably because the US military is not ashamed of those stories, but it is about this....

Honestly I would play this game to undestand the war, just as I what other programs on TV.

Evilnator
Evilnator

The war was a mistake and I believe that this game should be made, people should see the consequences.Remind people that war is horrible, and not glorify it like many other games. If people just forget their mistakes they are bound to repeat them again.

jhonMalcovich
jhonMalcovich

What was so glorious about Iraq War and why we need to commemorate it with a war game ? I mean the most powerful millitary in the world fought underdevelopped poorly armed in-1991-already-defeated Islamic country on false premises. They fought Iraquies while no Iraquies were involved in 11/9 attacks. The Iraquies who had sovietic-era weaponry. Their soviet tanks could only scratch the americans ones, literally. The shots were bouncing off from the modern armor. Iraquies totally lacked any air force. Their combatants were lacking in armor protection and modern assault rifles.

 

let´s take into account that all the rebels americans were fighting because they just wanted to protect their land from the unjustified invasion. You americans would do the same, even more, if some country would invade you. You would fight them even that country would call you terrorists for resisting them. Many of those rebel fought later because the revenge and resentment. If you would loose your love ones in misguided missile strike from the Coalition Forces wouldn´t you fight back. Wouldn´t the pain of loss blind any reasoning in you ?

 

Telling American side story is like telling the Aliens side story of the movie War of Worlds.

The story is like

- They were so numerous and we were shooting at them with our beams pulverizing them. And then they were shooting at us with those strange weapons that looked likes sticks but our shields were impenetrable. That war was a hell. I really hurt my finger pressing joystick buttons.

 

That war wasn´t fair and was far from glorious. Compare this was to WW2...please...germans tanks  could actually punch through the american armor. American loses were incomparable with the Iraqui ones.

Did I miss something ?

 

BenFireFox
BenFireFox

publish it show guts and dont care about some ppl be confused through that title

Motroucet
Motroucet

That was a compelling article Laura; well done.Yeah, I know people have mixed reactions at the possibility of the release of 'Six Days in Fallujah' but I still hope it sees the light of day, as long as they stick to their original vision of the game and not make another Gears of Duty: Modern Battlefield X. Yes those games have their merits and audience and I applaud them for that but the world needs something like 'Six Days in Fallujah' to serve as a cautionary tale but how would we experience something this deep without it being released?

 

Konami had their reasons and I understand but I'm glad Peter Tamte and his team of designers and Marines are still fighting the good fight even when the world has turned their backs on their vision.

romeomike0
romeomike0

Please release the game, it would be the most realistic and dramatic war game ever. We want to experience how its like to be in a REAL battlefield. And will be an eye-opener for call of duty players wanting to join the army.

 

6matt6
6matt6

This needs to come out if we want video games taken seriously as an art form. If this was a movie there would have been no hesitation in getting it funded and people watching it. Hell I bet it would have been nomiated for an oscar. 

 

There is a stigma about video games that its all about childishly enjoying violence and reveling in it. To break this stigma a game like this needs to be released where war ins't glorified with some stupid patriotic chest pounding like a Call Of Duty but a game that takes the situation seriously and shows the devastating effects a conflict can have on the world. 

gamingfrendly
gamingfrendly

id rather that this does not come out that war was a very big mistake in the first place al fallujah is something i do not think iraqis would like to talk about

brok
brok

Facinating insight. If it ever comes out, it'll be one modern shooter in a thousand that I might actually play. If Tamte really wanted to change the way we see video games, though, then the game should feature the Insurgents' point of view as well.

scarred_fox
scarred_fox

i agree, falluja (phantom fury) was a tough setting similar to WW2. mass bombings and house to house combat and plenty of stories of heroism that some people have yet heard of (House of Hell) but, there were many civilians that were caught in the crossfire or unfourtunatley murdred and those responsible were brought to trial. those events made it into a vietnam setting and I don't think people are ready to hear about that. as a combat Marine myself, i'd love to hear the story of those that were involved with the operation. unfortunaty, the general population have spoken and made this game but a script that will be collecting dust.

G-Lord
G-Lord

I always wondered what happened to this project. Another great article by Laura Parker.

Granpire
Granpire

I'd like to hear exactly why they think this game is different. All I've heard from this article is how "compelling" the story is, and how games can let you "make decisions for yourself". All this is true, but it's not really selling me on the concept. All I'm seeing is a shooter with destructible objects and some video interviews.

 

Please, tell us why the gameplay is actually anything to write home about, or how this is different in any way from Medal of Honor: Warfighter. It's certainly not the first military shooter to use accounts from U.S. Soldiers...

kingdre
kingdre

I don't think the world is ready for this game yet. Maybe in another 10 or 20 years when things have calmed down a bit.

diabolik_023
diabolik_023

i hope this game will see the light of day , i would like to see/play/live it.

Sav117
Sav117

This would be a good idea, but later, there is so much tension over things like this these days. All you see is extremists going nuts over stuff like this. The media twists and turns to make all arabs seem like they are uneducated and violent, when most are not. The problem with this game is it would probably be seen as an attempt by media to do that again. In all honesty i know that is not what they are trying to do, they are just trying to re-tell the facts. But it can be twisted just like everything else. The good intentions of this game to educate would be lost.

To be honest massacres like this should not happen but there you go, yaay to the human race

iamdoomed
iamdoomed

oh wait you couldn't make those games because Americans wouldn't like it and they're the only gamers on the planet after all.

GrahamZ
GrahamZ

 @mohamedmounem 

I agree with just about everything you wrote.  But games do not have to twist any facts to mislead.  The fact that the game is only a snapshot, and selectively (perhaps by necessity) chooses what to include and exclude, by itself can twist things.  The best defense to this, as you say, is to search in the actual history for the truth.  But not everyone will do that, unfortunately.  Telling only half of a truth is enough to shape opinions one way or another, depending on which half you withhold.  And it's not necessarily any fault of the game designer when it happens, as the only thing they are (usually) trying to do is to create a game that people will want to play.  After all, their job is not to inform, but to entertain.

 

And greetings from New York, btw 8-).

iamdoomed
iamdoomed

@GrahamZ and you only ever get one side of the story, usually the Allies.

Those guys you shoot? They had lives and stories also.

boredom_kills
boredom_kills

 @GrahamZ You make a solid point, but you can apply that to a lot of history teaching. There's a famous quote from someone: 'History is written by the victors'.

 

Using games to actually teach history will be an issue for exactly the reason you describe. However - if a game piques someone's interest enough to actually go and find out more information (hopefully from balanced sources), surely that's a good thing.

boredom_kills
boredom_kills

 @nyran125 Out of curiosity, did you watch 'Band of Brothers' or 'The Pacific'? If you're interested in WW2, you could do far worse than watching either of those.

OrkHammer007
OrkHammer007

 @nyran125 It already was canned once. Here's hoping someone has the stones to pick it up and fund it again.

DeusGladiorum
DeusGladiorum

 @boredom_kills While I'm sure it was at least partially a way of making profit, many returning vets were actually very supportive of this game. Oftentimes, it's the people who know very little of gaming and have a bias that will oppose things such as this. Want a perfect example? 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x16NPKtdUks

As a gamer, this wasn't only hard to watch, but it also really angered me.

epicgameresearc
epicgameresearc

@jhonMalcovich My opinion is a movie or game can't be truth... only a subjective opinion. Now, what movies and games can do is spark interest and exploration in an event, independent study. Whether gamers care to learn more after "game over" is up to each gamer. I'm still looking for the gaming equivalent of APOCALYPSE NOW.

AndrewII
AndrewII

 @EvilnatorIf the war is a mistake, then guess bombing innocent people, the same can be said the numerous war crimes that were committed. Overall its quite a shame that Obama didn't prosecute Bush and his lackies, though I believe if Ron Paul were in office he wouldn't have hesitated to do such a thing.

iceman0186
iceman0186

 @jhonMalcovich 

You sir are a douchebag. Congratulations, you suck at life, and you've obviously missed the whole point of this game. The game is about telling a story of brotherhood and heroism during one of the bloodiest fights in Iraq. I know I was there and I supported these guys. I'm guessing you're not a soldier and or marine and have no idea what "OUR" brotherhood means. I'll give you the not glorious part but like I said already and I'll say it again, they're telling the story of brotherhood between these marines and what fallujah was like through their eyes, that's all. If you don't like it don't buy it douchebag.

boredom_kills
boredom_kills

 @DeusGladiorum That video is just ridiculous. I live in hope that as people my age (I'm 33) rise to positions of authority, games will stop being demonised - because we've grown up with them, understand them, and are in a position to comment on them in an adult and rational way, rather than the knee-jerk stupidity that video demonstrates.

 

The vets being in favour of it lends weight to the argument (I'd hope) of it being the genuine attempt to expand the medium I mentioned.

jhonMalcovich
jhonMalcovich

I am really sorry for you, man. You had a traumatic experience. I am sure you had good intention. W. Bush´s government lied to you sending to the war on false premises and making you believe you were fighting for something.

 

But I don´t want to shoot Iraquies in a game. There weren´t terrorist. Many of them were fighting from patriotic feelings. It was 2004. America decided to stay in Iraq after the official operation was over. You would have done the same as thos insurgents did if some one invaded your country.

adilejaz
adilejaz

 @Darkseed_Sniper  @gamingfrendly And I'd rather that this be put up on with full support you know!! So the dumb and blind world would see what happened to the Iraqi's!!

 

But you'd rather leave it alone so the world would never judge the merits and actions of the super power of the world!!

 

I am sure those who criticized the game were empires that were afraid that if this is put up the U.S public may rise up and ask for accountability of govt. actions as they did in veitnam war.

jhonMalcovich
jhonMalcovich

@camyers1310

Iraq War has nothing to do  with 9/11. The funniest thing Iraquies were always moderate illustrated muslims in comparison with their neighbors. Iraqui women don´t even cover their faces and wear casual clothing. Besides 9/11 could have been easily prevented by American secret services. The terrorist who perpetrated 9/11 didn´t come riding on a cloud. They just took American Airlines. Secret Services spotted them and were following them. There was even a report from an agent who warned that the suspects started taking flying lessons. But your Secret Service didn´t arrest them, they just wanted to see what happens next. So who we must blame for this ? Bush said, don´t blame the boys of secret service or our lack of funds for internal security,  let´s blame all the muslims for what Al Qaeda did. And W. Bush carried out the program Iraqui Freedom for Iraqui natural resources which makes a lot of sense, you give me gold I give a hamburger, sounds fair...Right...Good business especially if I am pointing at you with M16.

 

So by some reason, instead of gaining World support against the terrorism, instead of reinforce your internal security, instead of spending those trillion of dollars on implementing state-of-the-art security measures and on healing your economy, W. Bush decided to go at war against all Muslim world because God told him to do so. Do I miss something ?

 

The funniest thing, you didn´t root out Al Qaeda from Iraq, because Al Qaeda had zero presence in Iraq, because, you know, Saddam Hussein didn´t like to share his power with radical religious nuts and he did like luxury and stuff Al Qaeda was fighting against. You actually made, with your unjustified war, Al Qaeda inmmensly popular and therefore expanded their influence not only in Middle East but in Europe too.

 

So you are asking what should you have done after 9/11 ? You should do gain support arround the world you were actually gaining in the beginning, and then you should have made surgical Spec Ops operations against Al Qaeda cells without making them famous and giving them the attention they wanted.

camyers1310
camyers1310

 @jhonMalcovich Whatever your feelings on the war may be now, I respect but disagree with. If Bush didn't do something; ANYTHING to respond to the fact that we had over 2,000 civilians lined up like sheep for the slaughter in 9/11..... we would have thrown his ass out of office back then. People slam Bush for his definitely mis-guided war. But we NEEDED a no BS Texan in office at the time. Our country (I understand it looks like you are not American) rallied together and we all wanted some form of justice.   Don't tell me just because it's a bad idea to start a war based on religious ideals, that we didn't have more than enough reason to do so. I get really upset when people slam Bush for his decision to hop on tv that night and declare war on terror. I commend the guy for doing something. What the hell would you have done in office?   Unlike some current leaders who refuse to acknowledge the fact that the entire Middle East is gearing up to be the battlegrounds of WWIII....  Hope this game gets funded if it truly tries to push us out of our comfort zones. We need someone to step up and make a game with some value to it. It is up to us, as consumers to show support for developers trying to push the industry forward no matter the controversy. Until we do so as a community, they will look at numbers and sales and spit out what sells. Which is what EA specializes in.