Q&A: Nolan Bushnell gets massive

Atari founder and Chuck E. Cheese baron confirms his entry into MMOG genre, addresses advertising in games, and chides the industry's poor job of self-policing.

by

In the 1970s, Nolan Bushnell staked his claim to the title "father of the video game industry," founding Atari, creating the first arcade games Pong and Computer Space, and establishing gaming as a billion-dollar business. Since that time, Bushnell has been a serial entrepreneur, founding gaming-related restaurant chains such as Chuck E. Cheese and uWink, and just last year taking the reins as chairman of the board for casual-gaming ad firm NeoEdge.

Industry pioneer Nolan Bushnell.

During last week's Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, GameSpot caught up with Bushnell to get the gaming pioneer's assessment of the current industry landscape. In addition to confirming that he's working on a massively multiplayer game of some kind, Bushnell talked about his interest in the casual market, in-game advertising, the death of arcades, games as art, and the recent flurry of legislative attempts to keep violent games away from children.

GameSpot: At what point did you kind of look at the gaming industry and say, "Well, there's a core market and there's a casual market now"?

Nolan Bushnell: I was actually a speaker at a Ziff Davis retreat in Monterey [around 2001], and I was doing some research for it, and I was actually very, very surprised with how small the core user group was of the console game market. I looked at it and I said, "Boy, there's something wrong here," because the number was significantly less than the number of game players that I knew were playing games that answered positively to the question, "Have you played a video game in the last two weeks?" At that point in time, in America, that number was 50 million, and that was a combination of coin-op as well as consumer. But that's 20 years ago. So I saw it as shrinking--all of a sudden the market went from here to here, and as I did a little more digging, it really was clear that the shakeout started to happen in 1983, 1984, when the games started getting violent so they lost the women, and got complex so they lost the casual gamer. Then [controllers] went from the Atari joystick with one button and a joystick to all of a sudden a QWERTY keyboard. So all of a sudden then these things sort of conspired to push away the casual gamer.

Then the second problem was the casual gamer, what was his platform of choice? And the Internet clearly became that. But one of the big problems was the economic model was broken because it really screamed out for microtransactions and yet it didn't work. And there were still a lot of people that didn't have credit cards or wouldn't put them on the Internet. So NeoEdge came along and said, "Hey, these aren't games. This is television." And the currency is the 30-second spot. So if we can just bring the viewers that we have to casual games and monetize it through the same way that television does--and it's worked for a long time--there's a good economic model there. I dove into it and I believe it's a big idea.

GS: So why is it that with this emerging medium of games that you believe the best way to get the advertising message to those people is with the old model of television?

NB: There are a couple of good reasons. The 30-second and the 15-second spot are there because it turns out that that's enough time to give a complete thought or feeling or get an emotion implanted in the mind of the viewer. It turns out that if you go much longer than 30 seconds, your efficiency drops. So you're paying for more time but your recollection doesn't go up very much. So even though you can almost say the 30-second spot is retro, I'd prefer to look at it as a fine-tuned concept-delivering mechanism.

GS: So Pong came out, and pretty soon Kool-Aid Man, Journey, Crest, and others had their own Atari 2600 and arcade games. It didn't take long for people to look at games as a way to sell their products and build a brand. What did you think of it when it first started happening?

NB: Yeah. It was in the early days of Atari there was a fundamental problem in that everything that we did was really hard technically. [The Atari 2600] was really a primitive, primitive unit. And on top of that, to put a message out that the advertiser liked, it was just way too soon. Technology wasn't mature enough to really be a good ad-delivery method. That's in my humble estimation. I think the first time the ads kind of made sense would probably be around the time that Doom started playing around. That was probably at a threshold of acceptability in my estimation.

GS: You've been involved in a number of aspects of the industry since the Atari days, whether with Chuck E. Cheese, NeoEdge, or your uWink restaurant. Do you have any interest in the core gaming market that still looks back on your contribution to its origins, or are have you lost your taste for that?

NB: I don't like to play in ponds that are [crowded]. When you look at the center of the market, where there's literally tens of millions of dollars chasing any particular product, it's hard for a small startup, no matter who you are. So what I always look for are niches that have not been fully plumbed that are still fun, where there's still some invention left. I want to be not where the market is but where it's going to become. And it's harder to do that when you have a somewhat closed economy like on the consoles.

GS: That sounds a lot like the approach Nintendo has said it took with the Wii, and it's paid off a lot. Watching it from the outside, what have your impressions been of Wii, and when did you realize that it was going to be your kind of a breakthrough there?

NB: I called it almost exactly six months before the launch. In fact, I got trashed on Web sites. I said the PS3 was going to have a difficult row to hoe, because there was too much angst and a little bit too much too soon, and that the Wii was going to be a smash hit. I was in Japan and I saw a demonstration of both probably six months before the US launch, maybe it was eight months, and it was obvious to me that the Wii was in the right place at the right time. And [it had] the right strategy because the Wii was really aiming for the noncore gamer.

If you look at people that were initial computer-phobes, they were not so much computer-phobic as they were QWERTY keyboard-phobic. People don't realize how few people, particularly 20 years ago, knew how to type. They hadn't written a letter since they were out of high school, let alone type on anything. And so they'd say, "What do I need a computer for? I don't type, and this QWERTY keyboard is frightening to me."

GS: You said development originally was an incredibly technical process. Through the years a lot of the barriers to entry have come down as far as that. Now you get fewer people coming into it from an engineering background, more people coming to and from a creator's background with the goal of making art. Was that something that you ever really expected from the medium? When you had a blip bouncing between two paddles, were you thinking, "Someday people will fight for this as art?"

NB: Probably not at that time, but I'd say yes three or four years later when we were getting into driving games and Asteroids. And in some ways, there was a backstory with missile command. As hokey as it was, it's still a backstory. And, yeah, it was pretty easy to see, because we could see a trajectory from Pong to Asteroids and you could say, "Okay, another five years, wow, we're going to have full color, we're going to have this, we're going to have that." And yeah, you could see it was going to get better and more resolution and more ability.

GS: There are dozens of Web portals out there and dozens of game ad suppliers. The market looks like a mess. Ad firms are making deals with the publishers, they're making deals with the portals, the portals are consolidating, the same games are popping up in a variety of places, and there are new players in the market all the time. Can the PC downloadable market remain the way it is now? Will there be dozens of portals for, kind of--in perpetuity, or is it going to shake out some one or two main players, or scatter even more?

NB: I would guess the trend right now is to scatter more, and I think that's going to continue. In fact, there are some things that have happened here today [at the Game Developers Conference] in terms of engines that are pretty cool, and you can make a pretty good game if you've got a little creativity and not necessarily a lot of technology. So I believe that those are going to find their way into MySpace pages and Facebook and their own website and next to this and that. And in some cases those games are going to be fun, but they're not going to be perceived to be worth $19.95.

GS: What are the biggest concerns that advertisers have? You're offering them a television-commercial format, which they know and they're familiar with, but television advertising hasn't been thriving. But you're online, which I know a lot of advertisers are nervous about anyways, especially in the types of products that they will promote.

NB: The big issue for us really is reputation and newness. Clearly, this is a little bit new and Madison Avenue is not necessarily leading edge. They embrace things slowly and timidly in cases. And I believe that advertisers are getting used to the idea and you can see that every year they're just more and more money [moving] away from television and the old media and more and more towards the new media. So we're on the right side of the curve, and as we get known and this becomes more of a natural, normal thing. When the guy is on a blank sheet of paper writing an ad budget and he puts in interstitial video game advertising, then we're home free. Right now, he doesn't think about it.

GS: It's pretty clear you're interested in casual games. And actually the uWink restaurants sound almost like a way to keep arcade games alive and to have a social-gaming place outside the home...

NB: When you say arcade, people normally think that you've got something in a big box but it's still a one-screen-to-one-person experience most of the time. What I prefer to think of with uWink is that this is a social experience. I think we're closer to board games around the family coffee table than we are at arcades.

GS: Do you have the affinity for arcades that so many people who grew up in them share after seeing them wiped from the landscape? Or did you think of them as a one-screen-to-one-person thing that maybe stigmatized the industry and gamers in general?

NB: I believe that the one-to-one experience with the arcade games for me was magical at the right time, providing I had a beer in my hand and a stool to sit on. And that was sort of the heyday for me of the arcade. Once the games got really, really complex with high learning curve--the "punch and kick" games, I never liked very much--I kind of felt that in general if I'm just going to have a one-to-one relationship with the screen, why not have it at home where it's comfortable, where I've got good sound, there aren't people nudging me, the sound doesn't have to be turned up to hear it over the din...

The arcades became an unpleasant experience if they were one-to-one. The only main thing that made an arcade fun from probably 1988 on, was if you were there with some buddies. So I believed that the arcades actually committed suicide. I don't think it was homicide. I think that they failed to provide the superior experiences which we get at home and forgot that they were an entertainment media that now had competition that they had to stay ahead of.

I feel that there is forever a need for people to socialize. Otherwise, people would never get laid and get married and the race would die out. So they have to socialize to a certain extent, and the socialization of a bar in a restaurant and things like that is the default for many people. So I felt that if we could create the game structure that helped that socialization, we'd just be better off.

GS: You've got a hand in a lot of the big gaming trends right now, downloadable content, casual games, social gaming... Do you have anything in massively multiplayer games?

NB: [Long pause.] Yes. [Laughs.]

GS: I assume we'll hear about that some other time then?

NB: Yeah. I think that it's a unavoidable trend that there's some socialization and massive multiplayer games that are important, and as compelling as World of Warcraft is, it too shall find that there are other ways to play a game.

GS: Are there any other trends out there that you kind of looked at and said there might be something?

NB: Yeah. That's what I'd call the area of physicality, to make up a word. Whether we're talking about Rock Band, Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution, Nintendo Wii, I think that if I were to plot one of the major trends going forward, physicality is going to be playing an increasingly important role.

GS: Gaming still has kind of a stigma for traditional gamers. Do you see the stereotype changing with the casual explosion and things like physicality going mass market?

NB: It's going to be a little different. First of all, there are a lot of women that are playing casual games. And there's a built-in mistrust where any time young men do something, it's bound to be a little bit suspicious. [Laughs] Just by nature. By definition, because most of the other things that young men do are pretty suspicious. And that's not to say that there won't be a really serious casual game that's a totally offensive thing. And the press, being the press, will hang on to that and try to make something of it. But I don't think it'll stick.

GS: With the recent rash of gaming legislation and attempts at gaming legislation, what do you think about efforts to try and keep violent M-rated games out of kids' hands by law?

NB: I believe that it's good to keep parents in control of things that underage kids do. And if the industry can't police itself, then you have to up the ante. I've actually had some problems because I've got a 14-year-old now that would like to play every despicable thing around, and he's got a bunch of 20-something brothers. But at the same time I think that there are some games that are truly despicable.

Discussion

70 comments
Serious06
Serious06

I didn't read the article but the fact that he's both the Atari founder and "Chuck E. Cheese Baron" is kind of amusing.

KirinLime
KirinLime

Very sad to say I didn't know who Nolan Bushnell was until this article! I'm certainly going to remember him now after this insightful interview. Great questions GameSpot and great answers from Bushnell.

Zacek
Zacek

Yes, it's like an interview with Little Richards, he is a man that everybody should listen often.

surppo
surppo

bushnell is a genius his words are almost prophetic, but all one has to do is look to japan for the future of gaming they were playing more casual games and guitar hero like games in the early 2000s nate i agree with hip hop rotting but it it was big businesses commercialization of stereotypes of the oppressive ghetto ailments that killed mainstream hip hop. which is why underground rap will never get old and master p is a pioneer in the modern record label, without him laying down the blueprint the south would not have gotten proper respect.

McDog3
McDog3

I don't believe the game industry has a problem policing itself, it's doing that just fine. The problem is in the ENFORCEMENT of those policies, these things wouldn't be as big of an issue if lil' 8 yr old Timmy couldn't walk up to the counter at Wal-Mart and purchase something like GTA, which is suppose to be 17+....

nate1222
nate1222

You A-holes, stop dissing Bushnell! Or I'll jump through your screen and kick your pasty, asexual asses!

nate1222
nate1222

I loved this interview! Reading a Bushnell interview is like shaking hands with Little Richard. He's a founding father of one of my FAVORITE forms of entertainment. He has also contributed greatly to global culture as a whole. @ Bushnell haters Stop dissing the guy for being objective and NOT kissing gamers asses! You wouldn't have Halo, Tony Hawk, Madden, Call Of Duty or WoW if he hadn't help pioneer gaming. I don't think he regards ALL modern gaming as TRASH. But like anyone with a passion for an artform, myself included, he's its toughest critic. I remember the demise of 'Hip-Hop'. I'd grown up in that culture and watched both big-business and the ghetto ailments that Hip-Hop inhereted from its origins rot it from the inside out. Both the corporate goon and the nickel-and-dime con man (think: guys like Master P) flooed it with crap until crap became the norm! Nowadays, it's nothing for a guy like "Lil Wayne" to lie about being a drug dealer (he was 14 when Baby gave him his record deal, not old enough to have really done anything), make a bunch of predictable sh** and flood the shelves with it. Gaming can just as easily be hustled if WE THE GAMERS don't scrutinize it. REMEMBER WHAT HAPPENED TO HIP-HOP.

lantus
lantus

I haven't read the Q&A, but man whoever comes up with these headlines needs to take a break haha.

derekhickok
derekhickok

What in the world is wrong with all of you on here!? First off, show the man a bit of respect. Your Madden's, Halos, and GTAs might not even exist if not for the innovation and brilliance of this man! Secondly, this man has a pretty good insight on the future of video-games. The uprising of the "physical games:" Look at the success of Guitar Hero, Rock Band, and of course, the Wii itself. These obviously aren't really that new, we've had games with fancy peripherals before, but with the death of the arcades, gamers are more eager for this sort of thing now. Furthermore, his ideas about social gamer ring very true too. C'mon, how many of us have thrown/been to a Guitar Hero or Rock Band party, or play World of Warcraft, or played FPS games online? There is a very distinct need for this sort of social interaction in gaming! Quite frankly, I'm excited to see what he has in store for us!

lowkey254
lowkey254

The portion about gaming legislation I partially agreed with. M rated games and even AO games should be created and sold. It is up to the parents to govern their children's interactions with everything which includes games, movies, music, the internet, and books (but who reads anymore?). Parents... If you up your game then you won't have to worry about your child.

Ubersj
Ubersj

This is probably the best interview in a very long time. Thank you Mr Bushnell. I am too young to make it into his attari and arcade days.(24 my fist platform was a genesis) I hae always looked up to this man, and he is always right about this industry. He and his fellow pioneers invented gaming and he more then anyone understands why it took off, why it failed and why its making a comeback. I think he is right about where it is going. his scatter idea applies to everythin as well as the Web gaming market. new platforms will emerge to provide differnt gaming experiences. Be it hardcore machines like xbox or playstaion, physical experiences like wii, or i belive delierd through TV Mobile and web. Or a convegrance of all. I loved all this insight, great questioning GS and great answers.

Cletus24
Cletus24

I love how people are bashing him because he's not kissing ass and saying everything about video games is wonderful and he dares to be critical of certain aspects of gaming., so he must be "out of touch", or too old. I think he makes a lot of sense.Also, he's not suggesting that complex fighting games caused the death of arcades. Don't try to read between the lines without reading what he said in the first place.And the ESRB and the game industry does need to do a better job of policing and regulating itself. It's not just Jack Thompson nutjobs who believe that either.

GKBeetle
GKBeetle

Why is everyone so hostile to this guy. He seems like he's really thought things through and has facts and figures to back up what he is saying, unlike most of the idiots blasting him on here.

Coheeds_Avatar
Coheeds_Avatar

@ Dr-Strangelove Haha thank you...I wasn't trying to bash the guy in my other comment. I just found his particular choice of wording a bit hard to follow. I'm sure it was fine English. However, this: And if the industry can't police itself, then you have to up the ante. Raises questions. He's aware of the issue, so what is HE doing to prevent his son getting his hands on these games? It's not up to the film industry to police what movies kids see, so why should the game industry police what kids see? Most stores have the 17+ policy for buying M rated games, and the ratings board makes it very clear which games carry which objectionable content. At what point in time does the responsibility fall on his shoulders?

YukoAsho
YukoAsho

Video games have regulated themselves just fine. Just because he finds certain things despicable doesn't mean the ESRB isn't doing it's job properly. At SOME point, parental responsibility has to kick in.

Dr-Strangelove
Dr-Strangelove

Coheeds_Avatar You're not alone, perhaps it's easier to listen to but in text it's hard to read. It seems he's still pushing the idea of socialization in video games, and still blind when it comes to seeing that console/PC games have been light years ahead of what he's trying to do for years. MMO's aren't the only social game anymore, you just need a mic or a mic/camera for consoles. For PC's you need to type or use a mic/camera, but seriously learning to type is no excuse to be afraid. When type writers were the standard that wasn't an excuse for people to avoid letter writing, try using your brains' plasticity and expand yourself. Also more and more people continue to go online with broadband at home making communication even easier. Arcades were fantastic, until prices went up and consoles caught up. I'd rather be in the comfort of my own home with friends or family than shelling out 50cents for 1 play at a mall, or god forbid a chuckecheese... He's pushing advertising hard as well which annoys me personally if it's blatant and out of place like the axe body spray ads we all know and love...

TBoogy
TBoogy

I started realizing this not to long ago, and this story proves it: People's reading comprehension skills here are horrible.

tykettovz
tykettovz

People really need to do research. Atari went bankrupt under its owner at the time, Warner. Bushnell left in 1978... LONG BEFORE ET. Seriously, you spend time posting on a video game site but you can't do a simple Wikipedia search?

comissario
comissario

this guy, maybe a great video game programmer, but he is not close to a great entrepenuer. Atari went bankrupt under him, Chuck E Cheese too, he suxs. he shouldn't even have allowed ET to be released, that game was way beyond awful, i felt like crying when i played it. ET was just an embarassment, i bet no one else except the single programmer (it wasn't Nolan Bushell, it was another guy) tested it. nolan bushell.......................!!!

CreepyBacon
CreepyBacon

Don't care what he did in the past, the guy is an idiot here and now and I for one really am not interested in his opinions.

DonutTrooper
DonutTrooper

"I feel that there is forever a need for people to socialize. Otherwise, people would never get laid and get married and the race would die out" Funniest thing I've ever seen on a Gamespot article.

onequarter
onequarter

i'm not sure he really understands arcades, oddly enough. They didn't die because of street fighter or an increase in complexity, they died because consoles offered games with more depth and more value, even when they still lagged behind arcade horsepower. and it never was one person to one screen. the reason why streetfighter 2 succeeded so much was because it was the first real head to head fighting game that offered a strong level of strategy. The arcades in Nolan's time were worse that way..it wasn't till 82 and 83 competitive and cooperative games took off. Back in his day you played till you lost a life, than the other player played till he did, back and forth.

Algolagnia
Algolagnia

Ralph Baer is the father of videogames. Not to mention Bushnell does look like Captain Spalding from House of 1,000 Corpses and The Devil's Rejects.

joeman676
joeman676

The title is misleading, I thought he was having a obesity problem

andydevilkazama
andydevilkazama

Ah the Bill Cosby of the gaming world. Just enjoy your retirement and your chuckycheese bucks and keep the crotchety old man opinions to yourself. You're blowing your chance to be remembered fondly as a gaming legend.

scruffybawls
scruffybawls

ok, Nolan Bushnell looks like a Carnie now, really dont trust that guy. The fact that he thinks arcades died after 88 or 89 and that young men commit "suspicious" acts, i dont even know what the fuq he was talkin about. i think hes kinda lost his touch with reality. hes a fan of primitive games, and bashes all ours. he apparently can tell the future, contradicts himself in every other sentence, scroll back up and look at his picture, he looks like he would try and sell you your own sh!t

AvIdGaMeR444
AvIdGaMeR444

Nolan Bushnell's opinions have absolutely no relevance in today's gaming market. The late 1970s and 1980s? Sure. But not now. I just get this vibe that he is stuck in the past and can't look at current gaming objectively at all.

berkner_ram77
berkner_ram77

He's got a 14 year old kid and he wants to keep him away from bad influences like GTA for as long as possible. Why does everyone have to bash him for that?

Coheeds_Avatar
Coheeds_Avatar

[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]

dadeisvenm
dadeisvenm

Hi Mr. Bushnell meet Mr. Genesis, Playstation, and Dreamcast. When the arcade scene was still in its peak, Mr. Genesis looked at Mr. PC and liked the quality of games it had and it "socializing" online play. Thankfully the third party devs. made close-to-arcade ports of titles like MOrtal Kombat, Street Fighter 2, and other title for the Genesis to the Dreamcast and current consoles and with PCs leading the way in online gaming, Xband was the first device to allow console games to play other players although this has been much improved since then. With improved quality of console games, online play and the opportunity for software manufacturers to reap more reward by releasing console versions of "arcade" titles, arcades couldn't afford to keep up. So your wrong sir, it wasn't a suicide it was a slow drawn out homicide. one-screen-to-one-person? Have you missed out on the fighting game genre and the advent of split screen multiplayer games like: Starfox 64 Mario Kart Golden Eye Madden Football (EA at its finest) Street Fighter 2 Mortal Kombat Super Smash Brothers etc.... Mr. Bushnell have you noticed that most games on the consoles boast 2 - 8 player multiplayer and more often then not the average console owner has MORE THAN ONE CONTROLLER?! Don't believe the hype folks... Mr. Bushnell is still clueless. Multiple minor iterations of the Atari Console (2600,2800,5100,5200, etc), poor game quality (E.T. on the line for you Bushnell), burying of good franchises and lack of quality control of games made on the Atari consoles killed his own company. Atari put finances before quality and it still shows.

haesuse
haesuse

I really have no patience for this guy anymore. last 3 interviews i read/watched he has contradicted himself, he has littered the gaming of today, claimed so overblown ego crap, and now he is going back into mainstream gaming. I think the senility or just some repressed dissapointment for leaving this amazing industry to early are kicking in. to be honest i could not even finish this interview!

nocoolnamejim
nocoolnamejim moderator

Nolan should wake up to the fact that there are a LOT of older gamers nowadays who not only are not turned off by games he describes as "despicable" but just plain old, flat out, are incredibly turned off and uninterested by cutesy, casual kiddie games that apparently he loves.

CasinoOutlaw247
CasinoOutlaw247

Everybody is entitled to their opinion. I do respect Nolan Bushnell for being a pioneer but, why the diss on some games being "despicable"? whatever happened to freedom of expression. ET for the Atari 2600 now THAT was despicable!

gamecubepad
gamecubepad

@LookOutSnake, Have you ever noticed the propensity of self-proclaimed "hardcore" gamers to start system wars over anything they think treads on their state of hardcoreness. You don't like the Wii, good for you. How does the success of the Wii affect you? Wait until SSBB, Mario Kart, and Wii Fit are released. The Wii will sell another 20million units. "Just Wait" would mean you're probably a Sony fan person. Well said.

jazilla
jazilla

I respect this guy's insight. He knows what he's saying. I find it amusing that he said he likes to stay out of crowded ponds but is making an MMO. I was taking a drink and almost spit the cola out on my monitor.

RaiKageRyu
RaiKageRyu

In other words he's saying fighters killed the arcade scene? That's retarded, as fighters were the arcade scene.

LookOutSnake
LookOutSnake

So-called "casual gamers" are not keeping this industry alive. "Casual gamers" buy a game every few months or so...they don't make games gold or platinum sellers. Catering to the "casual" fan might work if you're making games to be played on Yahoo or Pogo, but that won't fly as a long-term business strategy for consoles. Give the "console wars" another two years and we'll see where the Wii stands in the grand scheme of things.

GreenNinjaN
GreenNinjaN

I pretty much agree with everything he said except the bit about "And there's a built-in mistrust where any time young men do something, it's bound to be a little bit suspicious. Just by nature. By definition, because most of the other things that young men do are pretty suspicious." What the hell is he talking about? How is it the "by definition" young men are automatically suspicious. Whatever dude, whatever. But as far as hardcore vs. casual. I've never liked the expression. It casts a very dark light on gaming in general. It's kind of like walking into a pool hall and seeing all of the intimidating faces and getting overwhelmed enough that you just turn around and walk right out. Most hardcore gamers take this stuff way to seriously. These are video games, there supposed to be fun. Making these stereotypes kills the fun. I think that's why groups like Nintendo and whatever Bushnell's in charge of at the moment are concerned about the casual gamer. It alienates them and makes them not want to play games. I know most of you hardcore gamers will say "who cares, screw em." But you have to remember guys more "casual games" isn't necessaraly a bad thing because you were once a newbie too. And there won't be a shortage of "hardcore" games because these same companies know that we exist. And that we spend alot of money on their products. So just calm down. And now I sit and wait for the opposite reaction to occur.

soggycrotch
soggycrotch

I don't understand why this shriveled up dill-hole doesn't use his astounding clairvoyance skills to good use. If he can see and predict the future so well, how come he hasn't contributed to the now.

colincancer
colincancer

Come on guys... give his MMO a chance before you flame him. Give him a chance and if he fails, then you can flame him then, but the fact that you guys are already flaming him when you know nothing about the game he's planning is pathetic.

Dryker
Dryker

@ dadeisvenm: Very good point. "Casual Gamer" by definition is an unsustainable state. A so-called "Casual Gamer" will either tire of gaming and become in effect a "Non-Gamer" or become so interested that they play constantly, start looking for new experiences, and eventually become "Hardcore Gamers". People who have been playing videogames on a regulare basis for five or more years require more than just pressing one button and swinging a controller or a single joystick around. As our hand-eye coordination increases, more and more complex requirements are needed to give us a stronger sense of reward. I'm not trying to say there isn't a place for "Casual Gaming", it's very important and it makes videogames more accessible to people who don't play games.It is just not a sustainable demographic, but rather a transitional one between "Non-Gamer" and "Hardcore Gamer". I've been playing games since the Commodore and I'm 30. I've played games more or less the entire span of the industry thus far. I own a 360 and a PS3, no Wii, no interest, and have 18 games for this generation alone ( plus DMC4 and Army of Two soon). I'm a hardcore gamer. Hardcore gamers are the videogame industry. People who are looking towards "Casual Gaming" as the future will find it gone as soon as it's a success.

Lumenadducere
Lumenadducere

Agreed with gamecubepad. This guy actually knows what he's talking about. As for the "hardcore" and "casual" - I think they're highly misleading. "Hardcore" gamers also play casual games like Puzzle Quest, and "casual" gamers will play games like Halo or Assassin's Creed as well - but it might take them a longer time to get through it. The divisions need to stop.

09231991
09231991

@ LORDDICE1, I agree man, 100%! I personally do not find the wii entertaining except at the fact that I can't stop laughing at how stupid almost every game is and how poorly the controls are set-up. The only game people are anticipating this year for it is Brawl and that series has been outdone years ago. Seriously, I'm sick of it when crappy, button-masher fighters like smash bros. gets all the attention as being an awesome fighter but when A friggin unbelievable fighter like VF or SF come out, People are like oh its not as good. GIVE ME A BREAK!!! The wii will perish and will destroy the gaming world for good with its excessive taking in of casual gamers and crap. @ dadeisvenm, Agreed!!! PARENTS, FRIGGIN LISTEN UP AND LISTEN GOOD!!! DON'T YOU ****ING RUIN GAMING FOR US BECAUSE YOU CAN'T READ A LITTLE THING KNOWN AS THE RATING SYSTEM!!! And I think I know why people get hardcore and casual gamers mixed based on genre a lot and thats because most people think that hardcore gamers only play online shooters or rpg's and such so its a common mistake most people make. @ Vexx88, Uhhh, mmmmm, don't really know how to say it but I'm just gonna say that thats just plain stupid. Do you even know or can you even comprehend how huge a game that would be? DBZ is the biggest and one of the most well know animes of all time and I still enjoy it today. A lot of my friends used to watch DBZ at a young age and thought it was child's play but the only reason why, is because the friggin American version was butchered to death with at least 20 episodes of content being take out and a ton of violence and blood and swearing as well (and a little nudity). The japanese version definitely is a blast to watch but the American voices were better and thats why their re-releasing it in high-def, with the original japanese footage with new dialog and the American voices. AMAZING COMBINATION, JUST AMAZING!!! Now, on topic, The only thing I'm grateful from Atari right now is The new DBZ: Burst Limit coming out (Unbelievably Awesome!) As long as Atari can keep cranking out Awesome and amazing DBZ fighting games, I really don't care about this guy.

KamuiFei
KamuiFei

This is the same Nolan Bushnell that insulted games and it's gamers a few months ago, right? And he wants to make MMOs? Good luck with that old man...I suggest you try to gain gamers' respect first before taking on the giants that are WoW and Guild Wars...

gamecubepad
gamecubepad

I totally agree with his assessment of how the arcades killed themselves and how physicality is playing an increasingly important role in gaming. I don't understand the anger towards Nolan. I think he's right on point. This "hardcore" and "casual" stuff needs to cease, though. It gets old. The music and movie industries don't have this kind of stereotyping. In general, "hardcore" gamers are like fanatics of Ganster Rap or Death Metal. They think they are bad-core, but average people in society think they are too extreme and unpleasant.

liesandpies
liesandpies

Yep, us hardcore gamers are getting the saft.