PSN back in South Korea on May 16

Service only available for users age 18-years-old and above.

by

Sony Computer Entertainment Korea has announced that it will be reopening the PlayStation Store for South Korean PS3 consoles on May 16.

PSN's back in business in South Korea.

Gamers affected by the change will receive a free PlayStation Plus subscription for a month. However, only gamers age 18 and above can only access the online store.

Previously, the service was halted on June 29 last year due to the then new rulings of South Korea's Shutdown Law. The law was created in 2011 to prohibit gamers under 16-years-old from playing games during a six-hour lockdown from midnight until 6:00am.

Discussion

56 comments
vivalatour
vivalatour

The Last of US is everywhere , how can this be ? maybe they should name the game >

 "Just Way Too Many of US"  and that would seem correct-a-mundo !

 remember > if you can't feed them don't breed them !

tightwad34
tightwad34

As much as I hate all this control and whatnot, at least they are putting it back on even if it's only for people over 18. Or maybe it's a form of patronizing while trying to make it not seem that way.

granola_goodnes
granola_goodnes

I had heard about a few people dying of exhaustion/starvation from playing non-stop for days but I didn't know it was bad enough they had to make a law to stop it from happening.

That does suck though.  I used to love the weekends when I was younger because I could play games all night.

--edit--

Actually I don't even know if that was the reason for the law in the first place.

jsmoke03
jsmoke03

daymn....is it that bad over there that the government regulates it

SIDEFX1
SIDEFX1

Still teaching students in korea to kill the Japanese with your student books aren't you korea. 


decoy1978
decoy1978

Interesting way how to focus on education... Did something happen at SKorea to prompt their government to do this. I would figure they have more pressing matters (NK Nukes) to address than monitoring Little Timmy's gaming. On a side note.. this would possibly WRECK the MMO community of guilds =P

killlo
killlo

hmm if they tie peoples ID or drivers license to the psn accounts this could work

KingofCabal
KingofCabal

How are they going to prevent the kids from just lying on the registration?

chronocommander
chronocommander

A shutdown period isn't going to stop an ingrained social problem: the parents should be watching over their kids and prevent them dying after playing Starcraft for 3 days continuously and quite frankly the kids shouldn't be so obsessed to do stuff like that to begin with.

PixelAddict
PixelAddict

I suspect this will make a small blip on the usual Starcraft gaming by the entire population of South Korea.

Still amazed there are MULTIPLE TV channels in Korea showing ONLY Starcraft gaming.  Amazing.

johnaom
johnaom

still kids could make there account age over 18 so it still docent effect anything

d3nR
d3nR

How very (EA) of South Korea...

Scorchstar
Scorchstar

Video Game Communism.
Just what the lighter part of Korea needed c;

GnugnaGnagna
GnugnaGnagna

WTF they had a law to get kids off the internet?? Whoa!

Daian
Daian

Can someone please tell me why some countries don't have PSN access? (SK was a particularly special case because of that law)

fatee
fatee moderator

All three Korean PS3 owners rejoiced.

In other Korean news: Starcraft, followed by more Starcraft. 
Stay tuned.

LesserAngel
LesserAngel

"The law was created in 2011 to prohibit gamers under 16-years-old from playing games during a six-hour lockdown from midnight until 6:00am."

How in the hell do they even enforce that? I mean, locking online usage is easy enough I suppose, but what about single player? I'm not quite sure what the law is supposed to accomplish either.

jhcho2
jhcho2

@Scorchstar  

You can't make that comparison. We're talking about a culture of gamers in South Korea who would practically game for 48 hours straight, and would refrain from continuously gaming another 24 hours if it wasn't for the health hazard. And sometimes they do, and die.

In almost any other country, except China, there are basically zero gaming-related deaths. Only in South Korea and China, does this happen. So naturally, you should expect some very restrictive laws as a deterrence.

Saketume
Saketume

@GnugnaGnagna Normally I'd be upset but then I remember that every time I hear someone dying after playing games for too long they're always from S.Korea.

WhiteStormy
WhiteStormy

@fatee I'm sorry Korean Starcraft players, we interrupt Starcraft for more Starcraft.  We apologize for any Starcraft Starcraft Starcraft Starcraft....

lumbergoose
lumbergoose

@LesserAngel Almost every game in Korea requires you to sign up with your Korean Social Security Number, so they know who you are and how old you are.  So the games just block you if you are too young and try to play them during the lockout hours.  However, PSN never required the social security number.  So they had to shut down to comply with the law.

pozium
pozium

@LesserAngel Some laws are just there for stupid reasons because they are completely useless. Are they going to put cameras in peoples houses to monitor whether they are playing games or not? --maybe they are trying to reduce online games which I hear can be quite addictive especially over there -- MAYBE

tightwad34
tightwad34

@jhcho2 Yeah, but what's the worst that could happen if they get caught? At least here in America, I believe nothing would come of it. That would be messed up if they punished you for that.

d3nR
d3nR

And with EA and/or Korea you wont have a connection at all.

SIDEFX1
SIDEFX1

@jhcho2 @Scorchstar seriously. It has to take more than 3 days of straight gaming to do. even without food or water and you game on for 3 days, including no showers or breaks. The person body has to be weak to collaps. 

snova9308
snova9308

@WhiteStormy @fatee 

actually, Im south korean, and I own a ps3....

all this south korea starcraft thing just sounds like how all americans are pizza humping fat asses

tightwad34
tightwad34

@jhcho2 No, no, no. I know there is a HUGE difference between the two. I was meaning that there should be no punishment if you lie about that, and I have no idea how S. Korea deals with it.  I know in N. Korea you have to pretty much at all times worship the leader even if you don't agree with it and if you don't you are pretty much screwed. Trust me, it's probably the last place on Earth I would want to live in. Well, there are some others that are real bad, but I hope you understand that I am aware of all that BS.

jwk7913
jwk7913

@jhcho2 @tightwad34 No sir... I lived in South Korea since I was 4 years old, for over 14 years. I'm half-Korean on top of that. I don't remember mentioning any punishments other than a huge fine.

jhcho2
jhcho2

@tightwad34 @jhcho2  

I hope you're not one of those people who barely know the difference between North Korea and South Korea. Because you sure sound like one of them. Your statement seems to imply that South Korea is a country notorious for harsh punishment. That's North Korea btw

SergioMX
SergioMX

@jhcho2 @SergioMX @Scorchstar It's called a lack of education and laziness. It's not the governments job to forcibly tell someone to live better. Its your own damn fault. Obesity is different than deaths by gaming because obesity creates a bigger problem for tax payers than a kid dying from 3 days of Diablo.

jhcho2
jhcho2

@SergioMX @jhcho2 @Scorchstar  

Dude. It's called counter-measures. Lacking it results in epidemics....you know, like how 35% of the US population are overweight/obese? Human beings are never meant to be fat, much less obese, let alone one in every three people.

Hurvl
Hurvl

@lumbergoose That sounds like a more effective (but also worrying) way of preventing underaged people to access stuff. When videos or sites asks for your date of birth, you can write 1930 and get away with it, it's completely useless. In Sweden, we actually use our date of birth as identification, but we get 4 additional numbers where the first 3 point to your place of birth and then 1 random number to separate you from others born on the same day and place.

lumbergoose
lumbergoose

@ExtremePhobia @lumbergoose @LesserAngel Nope, I live in S. Korea.  They use their social security numbers to register for almost everything.  And apparently there is a way to type in a number and see if someone is of age (for bars and whatnot).  But they also verify when someone tries to use your S.S. number via a text message.  So I don't think there is much fraud (but I don't really know).