PS3 drives 17% Blu-ray adoption in US

Sony's gaming console accounts for 47% of high-def media players in American households, but dedicated players quickly closing gap.

Arguably the most significant differentiating factor for Sony's PlayStation 3 is its built-in Blu-ray player, which provides both increased storage space for games and high-definition video playback. Earlier this year, a study by The Nielsen Company indicated that the console's Blu-ray playback capability was the number one motivating factor behind potential PS3 purchases, but a new study indicates that consumers are increasingly turning to devices dedicated to the format.

The PS3 remains the dominant Blu-ray player…for now.

As reported by Home Media Magazine, a new study by Centris indicates that while the PS3 remains the dominant Blu-ray media player at 47 percent, dedicated Blu-ray players are a close second at 45 percent. According to Centris' research, the PS3 enjoyed a two-to-one advantage over Blu-ray players up until six months ago, when dedicated devices began quickly gaining ground.

Those large gains in Blu-ray player growth are indicative of explosive adoption of the media format among US households within the past few years. Centris' research indicates that 17 percent of all US households have at least one Blu-ray Disc player, a figure that has doubled since 2008. Further, about 1.7 million US households own both a PS3 and Blu-ray player.

By comparison, DVD player adoption reportedly stands at 95 percent, and mail-order movie rental service Netflix has penetrated 15 percent of US households. Centris' research also cites figures from The NPD Group indicating that Apple-based computers have found their way into 12 percent of US homes through the end of 2009, while adoption of Microsoft's Windows-based PCs stood at 85 percent.

As for the practical application of Centris' findings, the report noted that Blu-ray disc growth requires that the format move beyond its heavy reliance on the PS3.

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Discussion

166 comments
PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

@supernaught360 I am very saddened right now to learn that I have accidentally adopted a correspondence with a person such as yourself. Speaking in terms of culture, etiquette, education received, yearly income, and whatever other standards by which our society measures "success" by, you would not even be permitted to sit down at the same restaurant table as myself. You would not be even permitted to step foot through the door. I think it is a failing on my part to correspond with peasants out of the charity of my heart. I forget that social ranks do exist, and for me to try to speak sensibly to you would be just be a waste of my time. I did respond a few times to you since I thought, perhaps you could be educated, or if not, at least I can get a good chuckle as the peasant makes a fool of himself. But now both possibilities are exhausted and I must end our talks. Please do not cling to my cloak with your slovenly hands as I exit the premise, thank you. Peasants receive no adieu and none shall be given.

supernaught360
supernaught360

@PenguinIzzy It does NOT have 47% of the market, lol. HD DVDV was Toshibas baby, not Microsofts. 360's are still outselling PS3's, so... how crucial was the disc format, please? I own a PS3 and a 360. I STILL rent/download my movies in HD, and own not a single blu ray movie. Never owned an HD DVD player either. You can stop trying to paint me into a fanboy corner anytime now. Learn to read, please. If Sony hadn't have bought out the blu ray format, HD DVD and blu ray would have been competing formats, thus driving down blu ray player prices from their launch prices of $600+. You're argument is "I'm a corporate hooker for Sony and LIKED that those players launched at $600+ instead of having a leavening competing format driving the prices down", lol. In fact, only in the last 2 years have the prices for blu ray players dropped, due to bad sales, and they STILL only have 17% market saturation. This left the door open for HD rentals on Netflix and other cable services to get a foothold. I'll never buy another disc movie again, thanks! I can rent and watch them in HD a couple times and save $$ not paying $15.00 to $20.00 for discs that will collect dust. Congrats on being a nationally treasured genius! I'm betting you dropped $600 on a PS3 at launch - am I right? I only paid $300 for my slim unit. Mathematically, that makes me about, oh...say... 50% smarter than yourself? Checking calculator... Yes!

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

@supernaught360 If I may humbly posit an idea: If, by your standards, the Blu-Ray player is a failure since it has a mere 47% of the market, then what does that make the HD-DVD player developed by Microsoft? I apologize if I put more stock in your lament of the demise Microsoft's HD-DVD rather thanyour lament for people's inability to choose a HD-player. It just seemed as if you were awfully hurt that Microsoft lost in a crucial format war. It seemed as if you had feelings for Microsoft. I apologize for inferring that if it is in fact not the case. You don't care that Sony crushed Microsoft in a crucial format war, amIright? Adieu.

supernaught360
supernaught360

@blackdragon_ap I agree with you completely that you shouldn't "waste any more text", because that would be so... well, wasteful! Damn... the thought of all that wasted text...

supernaught360
supernaught360

@PenguinIzzy Damn, it must be tough to teach those lessons with such low reading comprehension! My point was simply that the blu ray market is proving to be a failure for Sony and their blu ray partners, and that they're simply getting their just desserts for spending so much money to promote an unproven product, which according to all market data, it in fact is at BEST unproven. Even after 6 years. And once more, so you can easily comprehend it, my lament isn't so much for the demise of HD DVD (I had no stake in it, after all, I now happily download all my HD content!) as it was that consumers never really had a choice in the matter. It's my belief that "sordid" business practices involving the squelching of free market competition is detrimental to consumers, and I even posited EA's monopoly of the NFL license as an example. Your argument is tantamount to saying you don't understand the principle of competition and how it drives prices down. So to be clear: Blu ray players would have been A LOT cheaper at launch (including presumably, PS3's) had they been competing with HD DVD (who were set to launch players in the $200.00 to $300.00 range), considering Sony would have HAD to lower prices to compete. I completely understand you now, sir! You enjoy paying more for a product because you're a blind corporate hooker who likes it in the you-know-what! But in the end, people (consumers) STILL had no interest in blu ray, and now they take a 150% loss on each unit sold. You're right! If it cuts... if it hurts... enjoy yourself!

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

@supernaught360 I actually offered the historical instance of robber barons such as Carnegie and Rockafeller to justify any sordid business practice Sony may have dabbled in, if at all. This offers a counter to your argument that Sony should not have interfered with market forces to gain dominance. Furthermore, I also offered the idea that no matter how hard either one of us laments HD-DVD's demise, the lament is meaningless simply because what's done is done. Blu-Ray won. This offers a counter to your continual bemoanment of how life is so unfair now that HD-DVD is dead and buried. I offer free lessons on critical thinking and arguments simply because I am a genius, a national treasure of our times. Adieu.

blackdragon_ap
blackdragon_ap

@supernaught360 'Oh, forgive me, you seem to have missed my point entirely.' No I haven't. Your point was - 'Downloadable distribution is what people are gravitating towards, and that's a good thing.' My point is - Hard copies RULE!!! Why? Hmmm.. Why don't you go 'r-e-s-e-a-r-c-h' yourself? Can't waste my text on you anymore, cause it's probably your ego coming in between. What do want me to say? That you're right? Okay man, you rock! :P

supernaught360
supernaught360

@ PenguinIzzy Right! You were obviously so impressed you posited not one single refutation of anything I said, lol! I'm a free market guy. For someone to "win" a bid to offer a competing product on the market, I'd rather see consumers make that decision, not corporations. Put your product out, spend the money to market/advertise it, and let the chips fall where they may. Sony simply didn't want another BetaMax on their hands, and engaged in corporate thuggery to force the issue - and now it's biting them in the ass. 6 years on the market, and they're at %17 market saturation with blu ray adoption. It's dying as a transferable media device, and as much as that irrationally hurts your feelings, it's just fact. I'm NOT an anti-corporate guy, mind you. Anti trust laws used to prohibit corporations from leveraged buyouts. It was necessary to promote entrepreneurship and price wars that make products more affordable for consumers - which BTW the result of Sony's thuggery was people were left with one choice, to buy a $600 plus dollar BR player, or not. They chose (and STILL choose, NOT.) HD DVD players were set to be priced at around $200 - $300, and presented video in the same 1080p format as blu ray, with no visual difference whatsoever, and with faster read times. Now Sony is competing with DLC, and l-o-o-s-i-n-g.

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

@supernaught360 I'm actually impressed with your level of research / tomfoolery. If you are mistaken and your proposed facts are all lies, then you are clearly in the wrong. If I am mistaken and your proposed facts are true, then I must graciously apologize and concede to you the point. Penguinizzy is a gangster as well as a gentlemen, after all. Suffice it to say, however, that both our opinions are a little insignificant when considering the facts on the ground, which is that Sony has won a crucial format war and is in propriety ownership of high-definition movies and films. How they did it-- well, the robber barons such as Carnegie and Rockafeller two centuries ago certainly were less than chivalrous in their business practices, smashing unions mercilessly and the like, but they got sh*t done. If I were a businessman [I am not, I am an astrophysicist with specializations in Einstein's theory of gravity as a curvature in space] I would do the same exact thing as Carnegie, the same exact thing as Rockafeller, and the same exact thing as the shadowy Sony president who I am sure is guarded vigilantly by the marvel comic book ninja syndicate known as the Hand. To end: I look forward to the hilarity of your posts and responses. May we be twitter friends? Good luck and best wishes. Your astrophysicist pal, Penguinizzy.

dRuGGeRnaUt
dRuGGeRnaUt

@benz1980i are you ACTUALLY saying competition is bad for consumers? BLU RAY ISNT CHEAPER BECAUSE IT WON. it's cheaper because of manufacturing costs, AND adoption rate. not to mention the fact its been around for how long now?!!? If anything a format war encourages underselling. And to blindly follow one format, for any reason, is ignorant. Blu Ray has the higher capacity yes, but look at the other factors, BLANK disc price, write speed, access speed. And you will see the difference. everyone on here should do some research about sony and their obbsession with "THE FUTURE FORMAT", and usually all it's lead to was higher prices, look at the "memory stick pro duo" and such, VASTLY overpriced

dRuGGeRnaUt
dRuGGeRnaUt

@blackdragon_ap You forgot the step of installing the game. Mgs4 isn't quite as bad as it loads during some cut scenes at the startup and at each act: -Start-up: 8 Minutes -Act 2: 3 Minutes -Act 3: 3 Minutes -Act 4: 2 Minutes -Act 5: 1 Minute A blazing fast connection can get alot downloaded in 17mins... But yes, I tend to lead waaay more towards hard-copies... most of the time(except for Steam) games bought through download only are the SAME PRICE as the hard copy version. It seems trivial, but I LIKE having cases,and manuals, and any little extras that come with games(which isnt often nowadays unless its the collectors edition) PS: anyone remember the KICK-*** packins that used to come with PC games?? even some of the console games back in the day had cool loot

supernaught360
supernaught360

@ blackdragon_ap Oh, forgive me, you seem to have missed my point entirely. I'll refrain: Downloadable Sony exclusives (like iNfamous) only take up the amount of space equivalent to a DVD 9 dual layer disc when you check your hard drive. Why??!!? I thought the big advantage of blu ray was totally uncompressed code that couldn't fit on a DVD 9...? Are you suggesting the downloadable versions aren't of the same quality?? HMMMM.... And wow, you must have a s-l-o-w internet connection, pal. It only took me a bit over 20 minutes to get iNfamous - what's up, are you still somehow on dial up??

supernaught360
supernaught360

@PenguinIzzy Lol - okay - well, it's like this: Pirates had actually cracked the blu-ray codec before the first blu-ray disc even hit store shelves, l-i-t-e-r-a-l-l-y. Look it up for yourself - there's archives on AVS forum with exact dates, so there goes the air out of that balloon you just floated. And while you're on AVS, search for hd dvd blu ray format war and you'll get a LOT more detailed info than Wikipedia (which you were obviously relying on). Sony's buyout of Warner was WELL publicized, and WELL documented when it happened, along with payoffs to Disney, and several others. In fact, Sony staged an all-out media war on Toshiba by contracting Warner to wait until announcing the buyout to stockholders PURPOSELY the DAY BEFORE that year's CES show, where Toshiba had spent millions on booths and marketing scat to promote HD DVD. Quite a company Sony is! I also liked when they refused to make charitable contributions to the producer of the Spiderman movies charity cancer event. You can look that one up too.

PenguinIzzy
PenguinIzzy

@supernaught360 You are getting a lot of heat thrown at you, and so I figured I'd throw in a little more. =) Any research into the history of HD-DVD/Blu-Ray will tell you that the Blu-Ray won the system format war because it was harder to pirate than HD-DVD. Obviously, piracy has caught up to the Blu-Ray, as any piracy attempts will eventually do so, but that doesn't rewrite the historical fact that HD-DVD was much easier to crack than Blu-Ray. Any conspiracy theories stating that Sony paid off several multi-billion dollar movie studios to monopolize a market is missing a little thing called evidence, sad to say. We can say that the Eiffel tower is in fact a galactic deterrent to keep space alien invasions at bay, but simply saying so doesn't prove anything. Adieu.

blackdragon_ap
blackdragon_ap

@ supernaught360 'Downloadable distribution is what people are gravitating towards, and that's a good thing.' MGS4 takes almost 25GB on the Blu-Ray Disc. Lets assume a hypothetical case that you get MGS4 as a downloadable game on PSN. What YOU will do: Goto PSN > Buy the game > WAIT for it to download > Play What I will do: Goto a store > Buy the game > Put the disc in the drive > Play and finish the game before you finish downloading. Plus when you are on-the-go, you can download( and wait again of course :P ) on a maximum of 5 activated PS3s and play. And when I'm on-the-go, I can put the disc in 500 PS3s and play , and nobody would say ANYTHING. Think. Again.

ebookerd1
ebookerd1

well they are being sold as combo packages with a TV why not!

benz1980i
benz1980i

@ pookiebear136 What country do you live in?? In Australia new release Blu Rays cos around $4 more than the dvd version. I bought the directors cut of Robin Hood (br) and paid $24 at Big W. Other shops it was a little steeper, but you have to know where to shop. Some retailers over charge, but same goes for everything. Shop smart.

benz1980i
benz1980i

@ supernaught360 "defeating consumer choice" lol you must have been hurt by HD DVD. The death of HD DVD has been the best thing to happen in the HD movie scene. Blu ray movies have never been cheaper. I remember they used to cos $40+, now you can buy new movies under $10. It hurts the consumer too when there is a 'war' going on. A middle aged couple want to upgrade to this HD buisness they have heard about but don't know the difference between the new rival formats. They choose HD DVD spend over $1000 on a new player and within months HD DVD is dead. Now days, you buy a blu ray player for $200 with confidance.

benz1980i
benz1980i

@ kavadias1981 I know your joy by experience. I had a 1080i tv, but my tv couldn't produce 1080i at 60 fps. This left me with a crappy 576p picture. When I upgraded it was amazing. It was like I was watching tv with poor vision. But then 1080p and I put glasses on for the first time and I could really see!!! My wife didn't approve getting a new tv but she was amazed and pointed out the detail to our friends. Then we upgraded to a fulll dedicated sound system and WOW!!! Home theatre never sounded better. We don't go out to the movies any more

supernaught360
supernaught360

@ blackace Your quote: "...once the major movie studios decided to support Blu-Ray..." That's not what happened. Sony PAID OFF several of those companies to ditch HD-DVD support, thus defeating consumer choice and free market competition much like EA did with the NFL license. And now it's coming back to haunt them, because Sony's promise (lie) to the studios about blu-rays superior resistance to piracy has been a catastrophic failure (check any torrent site). Not only that, many of the compressed blu-ray movies offer the same fidelity as the original disc, which makes one wonder why all that extra storage space mattered to begin with.

supernaught360
supernaught360

17% US market saturation for Blu-ray players is pathetic for a technology that's been on the market (and affordable) for 5 years. This officially designates blu-ray as a failing technology regarding digital distribution. Let me say it again: SEVENTEEN. PERCENT. SINCE. 2003. Dowloadable distribution is what people are gravitating towards, and that's a good thing. Here's hoping games keep going the same direction. I have a bunch of downloaded 360 games right now./ BTW: Has anyone noticed that downloadable games (like iNfamous) on the PS3 only seem to take up as much space as a DVD 9 disc? Makes you wonder if they really needed that blu-ray disc space for games after all.

FlashCharge
FlashCharge

hasancakir hit it on the head for why the PS3 is better than a dedicated Bluray player in that it regularly updates its system to handle new releases without having to download new updates to individual players. The PS3 ends the pain of updating the system.

hasancakir
hasancakir

I can't remember when last time I bought DVD or Blu-Ray movie. I only get the online versions and I watch them on my PS3 via my PC. (yes there's one good software to play video files on PS3 via LAN) Plus they regularly update its OS to add new features. That's why PS3 has more advantagous than a dedicated player.

pookiebear136
pookiebear136

They really need to start lowering the prices on new release blue Ray movies.

Erebus
Erebus

In other news, Demon's Souls drives PS3 adoption.

doublem2
doublem2

I got the PS3 for games... the blu-ray player was a bonus. But I can see how it's such a high % of players in people's homes. Though I love tech and gadgets, I would not buy a standalone player even today.

inferno394
inferno394

I have a ps3 and have no need to use it for a player. Its suppose to be for games and right now their isn't much too play. I just wish they would put all their resources for the games instead of useless movies that rely on pretty 120hz looks instead of plot and story.

SuprSaiyanRockr
SuprSaiyanRockr

The thing I like about blu-ray is the amount of space available on one disc. It's a shame that such a feature isn't utilised often.

noturfangirl
noturfangirl

@karmasbeeoch No doubt. blu-ray is for old people that don't know how to use a PC.

karmasbeeoch
karmasbeeoch

No need for blu-ray when we have the internet. Disks are so 90's. Saving to hard-drives is in. Only Noobs buy into this useless tech. NeXT!!!

NoremaC-_-
NoremaC-_-

forget blu-ray its all about 3D now and i was just getting comfortable

blackace
blackace

@eal-zubieri said: @blackace what are you talking about?HD-DVD has better quality then blu-ray? are you insane? blu-ray has 20gb more storage then HD-DVD and the discs are more scratch resistant then any discs out there,and since sony was smart enough to make the blu-ray format on the ps3 people who had a ps3 didn't need to to buy a HD-DVD player and don't forget that sony owns big movie studios so HD-DVD simply died and now toshiba supports blu-ray after their loss. ************************** I'm not insane. Blu-Ray has some issues when it was first released. Had nothing to do with storage size. The quality of some of the Blu-Ray movies were not up to stuff do to the firmware and support media version that was on the PS3 and stand-alone players. It was like that for about 3-4 months until Sony finally updated the software on the PS3. Other users with stand-alone Blu-Ray players could do it online or use a CD. HD-DVD has the same scratch resistance protection. When Blu-Ray came out several movie studios were supporting both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD. Sony's studios was exclusive to Blu-Ray of course and some movie studios were exclusive to HD-DVD as well. Like I said,once the major movie studios decided to support Blu-Ray exclusively, Toshiba pulled the plug on HD-DVD. With only a few smaller studios still supporting both, Toshiba knew it wouldn't be long before they moved over as well. It had nothing to do with video quality or scratch resistance. HD-DVD was even cheaper to make.

Triton
Triton

I really surprised this number is not higher. I myself still have not played a Blu Ray movie in my ps3 yet, perhaps when the price comes in line for what you get. I just have to many tvs with dvds hooked up to them to warrant buying the blu ray version of the movie.

DKant
DKant

For a second I was thrown off by the title; I read it as "PS3 drives 17% OF Blu Ray adoption in US". Had to read through a couple of times before I was convinced the headline was actually right about the numbers.

starduke
starduke

I wouldn't get a PS3 for Blu-ray, it's way too expensive. I'd still get regular DVDs. I'd get it for the GAMES!

BloodMist
BloodMist

An awesome Blu Ray player and an awesome console in one for 300 bucks is a pretty sweet deal, and unlike the PS2, which was rather mediocre as a DVD player, the PS3 is as good as it gets.

eal-zubieri
eal-zubieri

@blackace what are you talking about?HD-DVD has better quality then blu-ray? are you insane? blu-ray has 20gb more storage then HD-DVD and the discs are more scratch resistant then any discs out there,and since sony was smart enough to make the blu-ray format on the ps3 people who had a ps3 didn't need to to buy a HD-DVD player and don't forget that sony owns big movie studios so HD-DVD simply died and now toshiba supports blu-ray after their loss.

seriousplayer_d
seriousplayer_d

@karmasbeeoch explain why not? I love my ps3, I play watch movies and download cool PSone games,... so it's the better console on the market. End of Story.

kavadias1981
kavadias1981

@benz1980i I already had the sound system running through my PS3. The new TV made no difference to that half of the experience. It was just the picture half that was shoddy on my 1080i TV. So thats why I bought the new 1080p TV.

zeta
zeta

karmasbeeotch said that "It will never touch dvd's throne.." You sir probably never noticed the repeating trend because last I remember, The DVD was replacing the VHS in the fashion and within the same timeframe. Sorry..if I go to my local best buy and see 7 back to back rows of movie shelves and nearly 4 sets of these rows are filled with Blu-Ray's, that's pretty much telling me that Blu-Ray's are here to stay and they're pushing DVDs off the shelves. On top of that, the DVD did not have the same competition to deal with as opposed to Blu-Ray. The format has to compete with the DVD, AND digital distribution from the likes of Apple, Microsoft, Netflix, etc. etc. All of this competition and yet, the Blu-Ray is still selling and still pushing the DVD off its own shelf. I for one, has not bought a DVD in almost 2 years and I never spent any higher than 25 dollars on one. Don't have to worry about TV series because I can catch them on Hulu, TV.com, or Netflix. point being.... that above statement is a fail statement. A statement that sounds like what the VHS buffs said about DVD awhile back....before we saw VHS on that one corner/one shelf section at the Wal-Mart electronics department..

bayloski
bayloski

I got my ps3 probably 1 month after its Australian release, while blu-ray was a bonus, it wasn't a major selling point for me. Put it this way first movie I watched on blu-ray on my ps3 was Wanted first blu-ray purchased - the Dark Knight. We're looking at a fair length of time there. My increased interest in blu-ray has come from buying a 1080p TV. Rather than just a standard HDTV. I think the more widespread use of blu-rays has come from the cheapness of 1080p TV's compared to a couple of years ago. Theres no point having a good TV and not being able to show it off with the best audio and video fomat. Yet buying blu-rays isn't as cost effective as DVD's. Unfortunately for someone like me who owns a fairly extensive DVD library it's hard to contemplate replacing titles with blu-rays. The fact that I can pick up extremely cheap DVD's on sale still keeps my blu-ray collection at around the 25 mark. @BLACKACE I'm the same as you, buy action movies, CGI movies on blu-ray but your stock comedies, thriller, dramas etc I still buy on DVD.

STRIFE9288
STRIFE9288

i have 2 blu ray players and a ps3. so i have 3 altogether. and 2 sony hdtvs, the 46 inch one is LED, the 40 is lcd, both full 1080p, giggidy.

xophaser
xophaser

"I would like to see exactly where they get these numbers from because this doesn't add up at all." I think that would be computers and laptop with Blu-ray drive for the last 8%.

nonfanboygamer1
nonfanboygamer1

Having a bluray player in the console is added value the other consoles don't have.

blackace
blackace

Well, when Warner Bros Studios decided to go with Blu-Ray exclusively, that was the end of it. All the other studios who were on the fence followed suit and just stopped making HD-DVD movies. There was nothing wrong with HD-DVD format. It was just as good as Blu-Ray and even better in some ways at the time. Toshiba just didn't have any way of getting it into consumers homes fast enough and Sony did. I believe they did lower the price on their HD-DVD players first, but the movie studios decision was really what won it for Sony. If all the studios had decided to go with HD-DVD, Blu-Ray would have failed. Toshiba could have still used HD-DVD as a storage media. I'm still waiting to see the 100GB DVD that's in the works. @Cheesehead9099 @blackace exactly. Sony and other companies sided with blu-ray, and toshiba sided with HD-DVD. No matter how much support each had, HD-DVD could still have been around if consumers had chosen to stick by it rather than Blu-Ray. Look at digital distribution. Not many companies are supporting it (at the moment) but more and more people are starting to prefer it to discs. It's all about the consumers in the end.

Icehearted
Icehearted

And when they decide on the next format in 10 years or so, we'll end up having a similar conversation about it. I hate the idea of having a mixed format library for my movies. It sucked having to replace my VHS collection, but I bit because I saw the point and my tapes were getting worn anyway. Having DVD, Blu-Ray, and whatever comes next in a jumbled mishmash doesn't appeal to me, not to mention how much more I have to shell out, first for a player, then for the Blu-Ray version over DVD. Ultimately, I see this adoption rate continuing at a snail's pace because a lot of people still own CRT TVs (I'd be among them if mine hadn't died on me). The nonsensical 1080p push (obviously a money play by and large) on top of a tough economy, however recession proof these boneheads believe they are, won't help matters either. Also, Sony did actually do a lot for DVDs. I don't know if many of you recall, but the PS2 was such a profoundly better option in it's time as a player (both a console and cheaper than DVD players) that Sony actually asked people not to buy their system just to play DVDs, and MS locked it out of their Xbox altogether. Maybe Sony believes lightning will strike twice? It's their own format, so it makes sense.

Cheesehead9099
Cheesehead9099

@blackace exactly. Sony and other companies sided with blu-ray, and toshiba sided with HD-DVD. No matter how much support each had, HD-DVD could still have been around if consumers had chosen to stick by it rather than Blu-Ray. Look at digital distribution. Not many companies are supporting it (at the moment) but more and more people are starting to prefer it to discs. It's all about the consumers in the end.

Colonel-Snake
Colonel-Snake

I would like to see exactly where they get these numbers from because this doesn't add up at all.