Online game company sets $50 million for Japanese developers to go global

San Francisco-based studio Kabam's fund to help Japanese titles with localization and analytics-tracking.

Online game company Kabam has stated that it wants to help Japanese game developers capture the North American and European markets by setting up a $50 million fund for them, according to a Wall Street Journal article.

Kabam's plan may help Japanese game developers break the Western barrier.

The funds will be used to help game developers export big titles. This includes English localization, marketing and advertising, and analytics-tracking.

Kabam CEO Kevin Chou said in the article that Japanese game developers who partner with the company can expect their revenue to double. He also said that its expertise in the Western market and its partnership with Google, Apple, Facebook, and Yahoo will give it an advantage over Japanese game publishers Gree and DeNA. The first two partners are the company's current investors.

Kabam's games include the Facebook and Google Plus title Kingdoms of Camelot and the iOS/Android title The Hobbit: Kingdoms of Middle Earth.

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Discussion

4 comments
stev69
stev69

Crap, browser based, cash cow, facebook type games are hurting the gaming industry in my opinion, they rely on impulse buying and simple, boring and repetitive carrot on a stick gameplay. 

Bakaro
Bakaro

Good news for the Japanese developers , and more to gamers!
While not all like their games, it's known fact the island nation produce incredible creative and unique games. We missed out so many titles due to slow, if not completely lack of localization already.

Hope this move lead the rest of Japan to follow suit.

Mojira7
Mojira7

Wow. While all these major companies like Lucas Arts seem to be struggling. This free to play online company which I've never really heard of has $50 million to spend on helping other companies? My best guess is micro transactions are truly profitable..

stev69
stev69

@Mojira7 Of course they are profitable, they rely on impulse buying, all it takes is the click of a button and people cannot always resist that magic shiny easy button.