New PSN Terms of Service prevents class-action suits

Sony amends the PlayStation Network's Terms of Service in an attempt to stop future group legal action aimed at them.

Since the PlayStation 3's release in 2006, Sony has made multiple changes to the platform. Some of them, like the introduction of Trophies and DivX support, have been welcomed by the fans, while others, such as the removal of Linux-support, have been greeted with lawsuits.

Sony objects to class-action lawsuits.

In a bid to cut down on lawsuits that have been aimed at the Japanese hardware giant, Sony today revised its PlayStation Network Terms of Service. A newly added section of the agreement form that all PSN users will be forced to comply with in order to use the platform bans users from forming class actions. Instead, Sony will deal with claims on an individual level. This particular change falls under section 15 of the Terms of Service.

"ANY DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCEEDINGS, WHETHER IN ARBITRATION OR COURT, WILL BE CONDUCTED ONLY ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS AND NOT IN A CLASS OR REPRESENTATIVE ACTION OR AS A NAMED OR UNNAMED MEMBER IN A CLASS, CONSOLIDATED, REPRESENTATIVE OR PRIVATE ATTORNEY GENERAL ACTION, UNLESS BOTH YOU AND THE SONY ENTITY WITH WHICH YOU HAVE A DISPUTE SPECIFICALLY AGREE TO DO SO IN WRITING FOLLOWING INITIATION OF THE ARBITRATION. THIS PROVISION DOES NOT PRECLUDE YOUR PARTICIPATION AS A MEMBER IN A CLASS ACTION FILED ON OR BEFORE AUGUST 20, 2011." (All caps are in original document).

While the new Terms of Service covers all new and upcoming class-action lawsuits, it won't affect anyone who took action against Sony before August 20, 2011.

The recent changes to the Terms of Service now also cover the Sony Entertainment Network, as well as the PlayStation Network.

To agree to the revised Terms of Service, users will be prompted the next time they attempt to log into the PlayStation Network via their PlayStation 3 console. If you'd rather read the Terms of Service on a computer, you can view the full document (including all of its changes) here.

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