Moto GP 10/11 Updated Hands-On Preview

We spend some quality time with the career mode in Capcom's more accessible take on the motorcycle sim genre.

If there were ever a sim racing game just dying to give you a hug, Moto GP 10/11 is it. The series has long been known as a destination for hardcore motorcycle enthusiasts, with its no-frills presentation and straightforward driving model. Sure, there has always been a bit of spectacle in those gaudy leathers and helmets, as well as the constant possibility of witnessing an assuredly awesome 10-bike pileup in the rain, but the racing itself has always been pretty geared toward, well, gearheads. Moto GP 10/11 can still be that game…but it doesn't have to be. It's the first game in the series to offer a suite of purely optional driving assists for you to tweak and fine-tune the experience to suit your own personal racing competence. After getting my first taste back in January of how these assists affect the experience, Capcom was kind enough to send us over an updated build so we could spend a little more time with the newly hug-friendly Moto GP.

Having got a pretty good idea of how the various assists can have an impact on the experience in my last look at Moto GP 10/11, I decided to jump headfirst into career mode to see what sort of progression the game offers. The first thing I did was create a new racing team called "McShea Bikes" after GameSpot's resident motorcycle legend Tom McShea. (OK, so Tom doesn't really know anything about motorsports, but I did once sign him up for Truckin' magazine as a prank.) Next up, I created custom team branding with a sweet neon green and pink color scheme on both our racing leathers and bike liveries. Needless to say, the look of McShea Bikes has been a hit in the office.

With my team fully established, it was time to start racing. I went with the default medium assist level, which enables aids such as traction control, anti-wheelie, and auto weight transfer so you need only steer into corners rather than shift your weight around as well. Assists that are left disabled on medium, however, include auto-braking and auto-tucking for when you're gunning it on the straights. I'm by no means a motorcycle racing expert, but I was able to do pretty well with this difficulty level. I finished seventh in my first race in the Grand Prix of Qatar and then went on to nab first in my second race at Gran Premio de Espana.

Feeling confident in my results, I decided to disable a few of the assists such as anti-wheelie and auto weight transfer. Naturally, this led to a much tougher racing experience, and I spent an awful lot more time tumbling on the ground than atop the first-place podium. Fortunately, Moto GP 10/11 preserves the rewind button new to last year's game. You can use it as much as you want, on the lower difficulty levels, though bumping the difficulty up will disable the rewind button entirely.

After settling into the groove of racing without those initial assists turned on, I went back to racking up top-level finishes and managed to acquire a pretty decent amount of cash. Like in last year's Moto GP, you can use accrued money to fill out your team staff, including hiring PR managers. After a while, you can also nab sponsors who will pay you bonuses based on how you finish.

Another feature I tried out was the local split-screen co-op racing. The name itself is a bit misleading, as it's actually two different people on two different bikes. Essentially, you can have a second player join you at any time during the career mode events. The player will be outfitted in your team colors, and any earnings he or she pulls in go toward your team's overall cash pool. It's a neat little feature that helps to occasionally alleviate the loneliness of playing a long, drawn-out offline career mode--and you can also team up surprisingly well.

That about does it for our experience with the Moto GP 10/11 career mode. If you're eager for more, you can expect to see our review arrive around the time of the game's release on March 15. Stay tuned!

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16 comments
Kevydee
Kevydee

i am a total petrolhead and own motorcycles myself - i always bought this game......until you couldnt change the button/stick layout. if they havent rectified this then i wont be buying, waste of time plus these are OLD liveries like piran_tata mentions. you wouldnt expect tto play in last years shirts on fifa so whats the crack here??

Zee_production
Zee_production

oh man i love it...i have one of these...so it will be a lota fun

piran_tata
piran_tata

wonder if they realized that they need to update their rider line-up. For example, wtr to the screen shot above , the no 27 no longer rides a ducati

wondernova
wondernova

@ serginho_scp dude you are so right. 08 was spot on with the handling physics.

serginho_scp
serginho_scp

I tested the demo today on PS3 and uufffff ..finally !! they understood at last that the direction they were taking was totally wrong and they went back to a motogp 08 style physics approach..i can now make controllable slides/drifts with the bike... the on board camera still needs some improvement ( the bike kind of slides beneath you when you turn instead of you being the one to slide to the inside of the corner but thats ok for now). what i'm saying is ..finally finally and finally a motopg game worth being played. and this time without those stupid annoying voices all over. after last years disappointment i almost had given up the idea of spending some time testing this years release. but i'm glad i did after all. plus it runs at 60fps. the game is not perfect and there's still some work to be done ( the way you fall off the bike still needs improvement and the rear brake doesn't seem to have analogue control ) ..but certainly has gotten a lot better.. sbk 11 life's wont be easy anymore like last years ( despite the fact that sbk x was also a huge deception). hope the competition will improve both titles quality now, cause they were becoming really bad games. i tested the game on the simulation mode. i don't like the controller layout but it is totally editable and i used my usual bike games setup wich is perfect for those of you who used to ride bikes. L1 - gear up / L2 - gear down / R.analogue up - acc / R analogue down - frontbrake / R2 - rear brake / R1 - tuck in /

casper008
casper008

@ ronin41 i agree plus i don't think these game dev's have ever ridden a bike, if they did they would have never released this game/demo like this. Bottom line, stay away from this game. (and i love racing games)

Kawasaki_750
Kawasaki_750

I'd wait to see what SBK 11 brings to the tabel before parting with my money.

ronin41
ronin41

I'm sorry but this game is still crap. And if you found 09/10 "hard" and need assists to be competent at this game then you should not be previewing/reviewing motorcycle games because it's obvious you don't know how to play bike games. All you have to do is play the demo and you will see that the controls of this game are just plain bad. It's not a sim. It's not hard. It is just a bad playing/controlling arcade game. period that's it. No assists needed. just a developer that actually knows how bikes react. pure crap once again

robekl123
robekl123

No offence to the company, but i really don't like the camera on the bike :/

blueace88
blueace88

weight transfer on separate controls... very cool! Forza really nailed the accessibility thing with the optional-assists + optional-rewind formula, and I'm glad to see it repeated here

SIDEFX1
SIDEFX1

I think they could do a better job with bike crashes and damage effects..

SadPSPAddict
SadPSPAddict

This is awesome. Sounds like good improvements on last years which was great :D

kyleh615
kyleh615

The timing on this preview is perfect, I was just wondering if Moto GP 10/11 would be a game I would like to play.