Logitech's G710+ Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Just Misses the Mark

Logitech's first mechanical keyboard utilizes light keys and quiet switches, but a few extra features doesn't justify the rather high cost of entry.

Logitech's first mechanical gaming keyboard, the G710+, promises a lot. It's priced higher ($149.99) than competing keyboards, costing nearly twice as much in some cases. In fact, other manufacturers sell quality mechanical keyboards for as little as $80, including some models of the BlackWidow. We looked at Razer's BlackWidow Ultimate Edition ($129.99) earlier this year and praised it for its comprehensive feature set and solid design. Since the main draw of mechanical keyboards are the switches beneath the keys, anything tacked on top (backlighting, macros, media controls, and so on) needs to border on perfection to make the more expensive models stand out for the right reasons.

Above all, though, if the keyboard is targeted at a performance-obsessed market, and it sits atop the price charts, it better offer the best possible typing experience. After all, nobody buys a keyboard strictly for an additional button here or port there.

Ultimately, the G710+ is a backlit, mechanical keyboard, with media controls and features aimed at the gaming community. Logitech got most of the important gaming-centric features correct from the start: 110 anti-ghosting keys, 26-key rollover support, and dedicated macro support. Six macro keys (G-keys) are located on the left-hand side, and their functions can be toggled depending on the profile in use, which are activated via the three profile buttons (M-keys).

Recording simple macros on the fly is a four-step process: hit the MR-key, select a G-key to assign the macro to, type the keys to be recorded, and then set the macro by hitting the MR-key a final time. Opening Logitech's Gaming Software allows you to create more complex macros, taking delays between keystrokes into account, as well as link mouse functionality, shortcuts, and LUA scripts to G-keys.

In terms of game-specific macros, Logitech's Gaming Software scans your computer and identifies any games that may be installed. You can then choose game-specific commands and drag and drop them onto the virtual keys within the configuration software. The ability to automatically detect the games on your computer is dependent on Logitech's software and its associated knowledge base of games. Titles with mass appeal are likely supported out of the box, but unsupported games must be manually added.

The process is straightforward: search for the game's executable and assign a name and description. An icon gets pulled from the executable, but in terms of in-game commands, it's up to you to provide those for manually added games. At the very least, linking games within the configuration software allows you to assign specific macro commands for the G-keys when the game in question is opened.

Dedicated media buttons sit on the top of the keyboard, straddled by lighting and volume controls. The volume panel above the number pad has a dedicated mute button and a wide scrollwheel to quickly adjust levels. It's refreshing to see so many functions given their own key, since they usually end up as secondary F-key functions on most gaming keyboards. There's also a gaming-mode button, which, when enabled, disables the Windows and context menu keys. It's a handy feature, since an accidental strike of said keys would completely disrupt whatever game you happened to be playing.

Powering the G710+ requires two USB connections, though the inclusion of a pass-through USB port on the back of the keyboard makes up for this mildly inconvenient, though increasingly common, requirement. Sadly, there are no audio pass-through ports on the G710+, a feature currently found on all full-size BlackWidow keyboards.

Mechanical keyboards are generally identified by the switches beneath each key. Logitech employed Cherry MX Brown switches in the G710+, known for their midrange tactile and audio feedback. To reduce key noise even further, Logitech installed rubber dampeners beneath each key. All of the above results in a light keystroke with a soft impact. It's not as mushy as a membrane-based keyboard and not as "clicky" as most mechanical models. It's an interesting hybrid that takes about a day to get used to, but it's refreshing to have a mechanical key that doesn't irritate anyone and everyone around you.

While the G710+ has some things going for it, there are a few missing features that prevent it from being a product that can be easily recommended. Logitech sells keyboards for roughly half the price (G510, $79) with more features, such as audio pass-through and twice as many G-keys. True, these models don't have mechanical key switches, the thoughtful implementation of which (rubber dampeners) makes the G710+ worth considering, but if mechanical keys are your primary concern, there are cheaper options on the market. It's nice to see Logitech jump on the bandwagon, but it may take another round of R&D for them to nail down the price-for-performance ratio. As it stands, unless you can find the G710+ at a discount, it's best to hold off picking one up for now.

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Discussion

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Bozanimal
Bozanimal

 @doc-brown @pcbrown  I'm actually looking for a backlit, Cherry MX Brown keyboard, but the pickings are surprisingly slim. I've looked closely at the Rosewill, which lacks macro functionality, but this one fits pretty much exactly for what I am looking. Basically for $20 over the Rosewill I get macro keys, too, which seems like a good deal.

 

My biggest question, though, was regarding the Logitech software. In my experience peripheral software is bloated, and I wanted to know how intrusive and memory-intensive was this keyboard software. The whole "scanning your system" thing kind of freaked me out, especially in combination with the backlighting longevity concerns already being expressed on Newegg.

 

If you have a moment to respond, I would be most appreciative, and thanks for the review.

lebman69
lebman69

Too expensive. Not worth it. Best move I made was buying steelseries

EliOli
EliOli

Nice review Mr. Brown; thorough and to the point.  

evil_devil_mons
evil_devil_mons

damn expensive man. i mean 150$ is not too much but id u think bout buying an KEYBORD .its expensive. u can buy a low configured PC for 150 $ man   what its made of gold or shit. what... just few gaming keys added and it costs so much lol.. logitech 

mav_destroyer
mav_destroyer

Logitech stuff has always been over the top expensive and I still can't figure out why. It seems Razer, which is already notoriously expensive, produces better quality hardware for cheaper most of the time.

Zarkhaine
Zarkhaine

Never heard of a mechanical keyboard before! What are the advantages over normal keyboards other than being quieter?

jamesbigmac
jamesbigmac

Well I may not be getting this, but I always trust in Logitech products. I have Logitech mouse, speakers, and headset. They always hold up the quality.

trodeback
trodeback

I like my G110. Paid $45 for it open box.

Snaptrap
Snaptrap

Logitech isn't just about fancy features, they're about quality as well. BlackWidow has nice features but cheaply made.

GarGx1
GarGx1

I like my G19, just wish more games supported it fully

javalino
javalino

i really like my  Merc Stealth. I think of buyng another just  to play on my notebook.

tonet666
tonet666

Hmmm...What should I do! Buy a new video card or a new keyboard??? This price is insane for a keyboard. I'll pass.

DITHRICH
DITHRICH

as if the keyboard makes the gamer...

Zophar87
Zophar87

Logitech G510 is older, has more macro bindings, and is most likely going to cheaper too...Logitech Logic!

Zephol
Zephol

the S.T.R.I.K.E 7 are better keyboard!!

Juck_VII
Juck_VII

I think I will stick with my Corsair Vengeance K90 love it more then my old G15 and I got it last year around Xmas from Fry's for only 100 bucks lol.

Chavis02
Chavis02

$149.99 for that piece of junk?

No thanks! :P

tachsniper
tachsniper

all kidding aside once you type on a mechanical keyboard you'll never go back to a cheap membrane one. It may not totally justify the higher cost but I would not trade my Blackwidow ultimate for any other keyboard.

tachsniper
tachsniper

Ill stick with my Blackwidow, thank you

scarred_fox
scarred_fox

the keyboard doesnt make the player and if u feel that it does, than i feel very sorry for u

Reuwsaat
Reuwsaat

My keyboard costs $15 and what is this? what else does it do other than typing? 130$ more because of extra hotkeys?

doc-brown
doc-brown moderator staff

 @Bozanimal  @pcbrown Logitech's Gaming Framework software eats up anywhere from 40-60 megabytes of RAM when idle. In my experience, that's not too big of a hit. 

 

In regards to the scanning process, it only occurs when you initiate the process. I'm not sure if your concerns are related to privacy or system resources, but I did not find the scanning process that intrusive, nor time/resource consuming.

 

Hope that helps. Have a good one.

Zero_munity
Zero_munity

 @mav_destroyer Most of my logitech stuff I still have to this day, where as most of the razer purchases I have made are either broken or returned 

srocciso
srocciso

 @Zarkhaine Actually "normal" keyboards are quieter than mechanical ones. Mechanical keyboards lasts a lot longer, they are more responsive and depending on the type of switches used they can enhance your typing speed or your gaming speed for games that require a lot of actions like SC2, LoL or Dota 2 to name a few. They tend to reduce fatigue for those of us that spend tons of hours typing and they also have a great "feeling" to them. After a while you can just type by feel alone or, in case of the cherry blue keyboards, they have an audible click that lets you know when the key can be released.

ts997
ts997

 @tachsniper i too have a BWU and it is amazing typing on a laptop or membrane now just feels wrong

srocciso
srocciso

 @scarred_fox I agree with you but a really good keyboard can greatly reduce finger fatigue and also improve accuracy with your hands which lets you game for longer periods of time. I guess its like saying why buy a BMW when that shitty Yugo you have in the backyard can take you from point A to B as well. It's just a luxury item

Diamondsoulz
Diamondsoulz

You are Right I have a Microsoft 600 Keyboard and I'm ranked in the top 120 in Duke Nukem Forever @scarred_fox

tachsniper
tachsniper

 @scarred_fox it wont make a bad player good, but it will make a good player slightly better.

nate1222
nate1222

 @scarred_fox

 Thank you. The age of PC gaming 'elitists' is just about over. More gamers are getting into the PC scene and discovering that you don't need a $1,000 rig with a $300 graphics card in order to have a great experience. Things like $60 mice and $100 keyboards are going the way of the dinosaur.

 

Most off-the-shelf laptops come with moderately powered GPUs these days and run most modern games on medium to max settings.

tachsniper
tachsniper

 @Reuwsaat trust me once you type on a mechanical keyboard you'll never use a cheap membrane one ever again

 

Soundaholic92
Soundaholic92

 @Zero_munity  @mav_destroyer My 5-year-old Death Adder still works like it's new, even with all the dents and scratches from dropping it (I carry my laptops around a lot for dorm LAN parties). The same goes for my thumbgrid, headphones and keyboard. I can't say anything about Logitech's gaming series because I've never used any of them, but my experiences with them when I used my friends' gears have been good

Tidal_Abyss
Tidal_Abyss

 @Zero_munity  @mav_destroyer

I have a multiple PC house and I use Razer products on all of them and have done so for years without a single problem- with any of them- they're working great, like the day I first opened the package-  I've gotten my money's worth and more out of every item. I have a few Logitech items as well- 200watt THX cert./speakers/subwoofer here on my desk hooked to this PC and a Racing wheel from them. They're o.k. but I prefer Razer- they've not let me down yet. I mainly just use logitech if it's something I can't get from Razer.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

scarred_fox
scarred_fox

 @tachsniper

 with a few extra buttons in the right place? sure, but for that price no thanks. my microsoft media keyboard and 5-button microsoft intelli mouse has definately made weapon swapping or insta-prone much easier...all under $25 each. best part is, i've had this setup since high school

gpm23
gpm23

 @nate1222  @scarred_fox 

Part of the fun, if no the most, is actually building a PC yourself.  I have learned quite a bit about computers over the years just by simply troubleshooting, building, patching, and maintaining my own PC.  Then, when you get comfortable enough, you can help out your friends and family when they have problems.  I built my dad a brand new desktop pc for xmas and he thought it was the greatest thing ever.  It cost hardly anything to do because I know where to buy each part.  I guess that is the artistic side in me, which others may not possess, but that's ok.  It's totally fine if that isn't something someone is interested in spending time doing, but I think what most PC users are trying to do is simply help people save money.  It takes some effort, but it's worth it in the long run.

pezzott1
pezzott1

 @nate1222  @scarred_fox This wont last long. Console hardware are dragging games back since devs have to simultaneously work for all platforms. pc tends to get the ports. 

 

As soon as new generation of consoles are released, the bar of system requirements will be a lot higher. 

Matty_gamer
Matty_gamer

 @scarred_fox  @tachsniper and all of us are supposed to know how long ago you were in high school? heck it could be even less than a year or more than 15 years. :p

scarred_fox
scarred_fox

 @gpm23  @nate1222

 knowing ur computer insides is half the battle. installing the correct software is the other half ^^

YoungCardinal
YoungCardinal

 @gpm23  

The best way to learn by making mistakes and troubleshooting them on your own. Thats what I did :)

 

A store wanted to charge me $150 to reinstall windows one time. I was noob when it came to that kind of stuff years ago, but opted to do it myself.

 

Newegg, NCIX and CanadaComputers are amazing where I live XD

 

 

 

Joe51187
Joe51187

 @pezzott1  @nate1222  @scarred_fox  This isn't true. Physical limitations in computer hardware is dragging back the advancement of graphics. If you think there's going to be a huge jump in hardware requirements like what we say with current gen from the past, prepare to be pleasantly surprised.

scarred_fox
scarred_fox

 @pezzott1  @nate1222

well, the bar will be raised slightly higher. first yr will be good, then the console ports will come back since PC hardware will continue to improve and console gets left behind.