Intel Extreme Masters tournament in China cancelled

League of Legends and Starcraft 2 tournament Intel Extreme Masters cancelled; qualified players to be compensated for travel bookings made.

The Intel Extreme Masters tournament will not be taking place this year due to the cancellation of the Anime and Games show. Set to take place in Guangzhou, China, the event was to host tournaments for League of Legends and Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty and run alongside the show.

Both League of Legends and Starcraft 2 will be a no show at IEM this year.

An official statement from the Anime and Games show cites problems caused by increased expected visitor traffic and manpower shortage.

According to a statement released by organizers ESL, unofficial sources in China reported the cancellation as connected to political unrest between China and Japan. The Anime and Games Show features Japanese culture, which caused security concerns.

"We are terribly sorry to disappoint esports fans that were expecting to enjoy the event, especially all Chinese esports fans. Unfortunately, the circumstances that forced the cancellation upon us were entirely beyond our control, though we understand and respect the decisions made by the Anime Comics and Games organizers." ESL's Director of Pro Gaming Michal Blicharz commented in an official statement.

Qualified teams and players who have already booked their travel plans will receive compensation.

Written By

Zorine “harli” Te is a long time Australian competitive gamer and also an Associate Editor at GameSpot.

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Discussion

25 comments
RaiKageRyu
RaiKageRyu

Of course WCS Global Finals can take place in Shanghai. Blizzard rents out that place. 

 

IEM works by hosting their tournaments in-conjunction with conventions. The Anime convention was cancelled. Therefore, no tournament.

KingofCabal
KingofCabal

Why dont they just do it in south Korea?

BlackaliciousX
BlackaliciousX

This isn't that surprising. It is a big election year in China, and there are large Chinese nationalist groups that feel nothing but disdain towards the Japanese. These sentiments are encouraged by many Chinese officials to further their platform and demonstrate how opponents are not pro-China. For analogy, these tactics parallel American nationalist sentiments towards  Mexicans/Latinas/Latinos/Chicanas/Chicanos etc, but the Japanese also have WW2 to fuel the flames.

Not trying to start a heated debate, just informing.

inaka_rob
inaka_rob

Efff the Chinese government. The world will soon look back at letting host the Olympics in the same light we look at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. The world is in denial they are becoming a socialist nationalist military nation because we all buy "made in china". Fake murder trials. No freedom of speech. Censorship of the worst kind. Forced abortions. make no mistake at all china is letting these violent protests against china happen. They are not only allowing them, they are encouraging them. They control the news. They control the police. The police are doing nothing and the news is fueling the blind sheep more and more. China has stirring the pot for the last then years. Pushing the boundaries of what they can do. Japan and china may very well fire shots over this island dispute. They have alreadyr shit down over a dozen multi billion dollar factories. China is on the brink of loosing a $375 billion a year trade with Japan. Guess what Japan can find cheap labor in any other asian country.

naryanrobinson
naryanrobinson

Isn't the world championship taking place in Shanghai though?  Surely it's not that big a loss then.

1Duy
1Duy

My condolences. But on the bright side, all the participants can leave that horrible country ASAP. You can get beaten to death in China just for using Playstation or WiiU.

Fenriswolf
Fenriswolf

You do know that China is one of the largest market for online gamers right? Dota type games are insanely popular, and a Chinese clan even won the recent Dota 2 tournament.

DESTROYRS_F8
DESTROYRS_F8

interesting.  thx for the little info.  now i'm going to look up articles in connection to this cancellation.  it will make me less ignorant and you have prevented me from making a fool out of myself commenting/replying on an issue I am not aware of.

Fenriswolf
Fenriswolf

 @inaka_rob As a Chinese resident, I find your comparison to Berlin 1936 offensive, considering that the political situation in China is nothing like pre-WWII Germany, but more like Seoul 1988, where a dictatorship is undergoing gradual political change via economic reform. Many Chinese themselves are genuinely enthusiastic about the Olympics, and the West seems to think that trying to publicly embarrass China would spur change, but in fact it only increases the defensive nationalism of its residents, and drives home the belief that the West is deliberately trying hinder China's growth, like what happened a century ago when the colonial powers pillaged China.

 

You might think that the Chinese are "oppressed" by their government, but in reality most of them don't hate the government as you expect them to. Censorship and free speech aren't as an important issues to them as economic stability, and having means of livelihood. Chinese netizens has certainly worked their way across the censorship, and popular social websites like Weibo are frequently used to discuss politics and expose political scandals, resulting in several public officials being dismissed as a result.

 

And China is far from a "socialist nationalist military nation" as you claimed, but is becoming more and more a decentralized corporatist state, as many of the provincial politicians are doing things behind the backs of the central government, and more people are joining the "Communist" Party for economic gains than anything else.

It's rather hypocritical to point fingers at China when the US started two wars the last decade in the names of freedom and resulted in close to a million dead, not to mention that it actively encouraged dictatorships back during the Cold War, in which Taiwan and South Korea gradually became democracies after a period of authoritarian economic reforms. Yet when China does the same, it's wrong?

 

With all said, these protesters are largely disenfranchised youths suffering from post-college unemployment, and the PRC government is letting them protest against Japan because it's an acceptable target for all, otherwise they could have easily protested against the central government to address their own issues. They certainly do not want a repeat of the Tiananmen Square incident, which originated in the same demographics protesting about China's then economic changes.

inaka_rob
inaka_rob

Just to clarify this is not about race, this is about government.

r4v3gl0ry
r4v3gl0ry

 @1Duy Cool response, mang. Surely my relatives in Guangzhou hunt for people using Japanese products every day. No, but seriously, you have no idea of the general level of apathy people in China feel for government, politics, religion...it's why some extremists and protesters, say the ones in Beijing/Peking right now, are being held back from learning and realizing that the past is the past. And even though you sound like one of those uncultured people right now, I do agree that this is somewhat of a loss. I really hope competitive gaming will gain at least some sort of a foothold in China someday. 

1Duy
1Duy

 @r4v3gl0ry I find it strange that in the news there're only Chinese people attacking Japanese people and Japanese-owned companies. Would you please enlighten me?

1Duy
1Duy

 @Lhomity Well, my family invested in a Japanese store in China. Recently, the store was destroyed and looted by one of those riots. The government didn't do anything to prevent or stop the looters. And obviously it's none of their business to compensate. Serve my family right for doing business with Japanese people in Mainland.

r4v3gl0ry
r4v3gl0ry

 @1Duy  @r4v3gl0ry Honestly, I can't tell what represents China. Government is pretty negligent about anything that doesn't pertain to business and the economy and so are the people. It's not so much a peace or war loving nation as it is a reckless one. No sensible younger generation Chinese person would really disagree that there's a general lack of empathy shared between Chinese people (I can't even get refunds from Chinese stores). I actually don't wholly disagree with you when you say that the country is horrible (I think I actually wrote and meant that in one of my replies), because it and its people's underdeveloped sense of culture are creating a growing social divide right now. There's almost no independent film or music scene and I don't see too many original trends starting in China. In addition, there is no collective heartfelt opinion on any issue in China right now, no activism for the rights of animals and certainly very little for environmental pollution. Anti-Japanese activism is senseless, as is all hate, but it will not get worse unless it is further exploited by politicians, in which case those aggressive newspapers may really start to come in handy. Here, a link: http://www.koreabang.com/2012/stories/tokyo-governor-calls-china-crazy-koreans-side-with-china.html

1Duy
1Duy

 @r4v3gl0ry My apology for calling China a horrible country. But it's often the majority that represents a collective group. I simply don't understand why your government let those extremists did what they did and got away without no punishment. And the newspapers, especially 环球时报, are so aggresive. Nowadays, reading news about Japan in Chinese newspapers is like reading threat letters. Whether China is a peace-loving country is questionable.

r4v3gl0ry
r4v3gl0ry

I guess in hindsight you could've pinpointed the problem to hubs of dissent and not the entire horrible country. And you have another thing wrong--we'd try our hardest to acquire entertainment items of high value to brag and save for saving face in front of our family members. It's a cultural thing. Really. 

r4v3gl0ry
r4v3gl0ry

I really wish I could tell you that that is happening all around the country, but I can't. Sorry, that vision hasn't come to life. These are isolated incidents, even with yesterday's Beijing protest...however unsettlingly large that might have been. And that is strange. I see some Koreans protesting, waving their tae guk gis against the Japanese on their day of independence too. Huh. You're passionate, I get it. But before you carry on, please go sit in the middle of a street in Chengdu or the middle of the entire province of Shanxi itself or bustling Qingdao and try and peddle Japanese goods. See how many people buy them anyway.  You'll get varied reactions--educated and uneducated--depending on who you talk to, their income, where they live.Now seriously tell me that people from the countryside actually care. See? You missed them. Darn it.  Oh, and don't forget to account for city folk and university students who might senselessly beat the Japanese! lol

1Duy
1Duy

 @Volgin  @Lhomity Those are assumptions based on what you've read. If only you could read Chinese newspapers (the mainstream ones), you'll see how China threaten that the one getting hurt, economically and politically, will be Japan.

1Duy
1Duy

 @Volgin @Lhomity So now you're making assumptions? I didn't know that it's legal to be a looter in China if you're only looting small stores. You must be a Chinese law expert.

BTW, the arsonists really did a fine job with those Toyota showrooms. You wouldn't believe there were cars in those showrooms if I told you.

1Duy
1Duy

 @Volgin  @Lhomity I guess you can say the same thing to Panasonic, Toyota and every Japanese companies doing business in China since last century.